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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date March 2014

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 28
  • IEEE Communications Magazine - cover

    Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 4
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  • IEEE ComSoc conferences: The way forward [The President's Page]

    Page(s): 6 - 7
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  • Conference calendar

    Page(s): 10
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  • Book review

    Page(s): 11
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  • Comsoc training [Certification Corner]

    Page(s): 12
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  • IEEE GLOBECOM 2014 [Conference Preview]

    Page(s): 13
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  • IEEE SmartGridComm 2014 [Conference Preview]

    Page(s): 14
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  • IEEE ICC 2014 [Conference Preview]

    Page(s): 15
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  • ICUMT 2013 Congress in Almaty, Kazakhstan [IEEE Communications Magazine]

    Page(s): 1 - 4
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  • Lessons of the Great East Japan Earthquake [Guest editorial]

    Page(s): 21 - 22
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  • Experience of infrastructure damage caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake and countermeasures against future disasters

    Page(s): 23 - 29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1106 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, which was the fourth strongest earthquake ever recorded in the world's history, severely damaged telecommunication facilities in unprecedented ways. The large-scale earthquake and tsunami affected many exchange office buildings and facilities. Further damage to services was caused due to the depletion of batteries associated with the prolonged disruption of the commercial power supply. The tremendous disaster caused service disruption to the communications infrastructure; in the case of NTT's facilities, approximately 1.5 million circuits for fixed lines and 4900 mobile base stations stopped working due to direct damage by the earthquake and/or tsunami or subsequent blackouts. However, more than 90 percent of the affected exchange offices and mobile base station equipment was restored by the end of March through an all-out effort by over 11,000 people. Even by the end of April, in areas where customers currently reside, service restoration has mostly been completed except for some areas experiencing construction difficulties, including damaged roads which made it difficult for workers to approach the site. In parallel with the restoration effort, a disaster emergency message service for voice, mobile, and the Internet was quickly provided in order to permit safety confirmation. The NTT Group installed temporary public telephones and Internet access environments, and also lent mobile phones, satellite mobile phones, and tablets free of charge to the affected people and government agencies. Since communication services are vital in modern society, we are making every effort to implement better countermeasures with future disasters in mind. View full abstract»

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  • What is the role of universities in disaster response, recovery, and rehabilitation? Focusing on our disaster victim identification project

    Page(s): 30 - 37
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    A university provides diverse knowledge and expertise that can be mobilized readily in response to community needs in the event of a disaster. Due to its comprehensive capability, a university can contribute significantly in all phases of disaster cycles: pre-disaster preparedness, disaster response, and disaster recovery. It is this comprehensive strength that makes universities such an important part of our society, even in a disaster situation. This article summarizes Tohoku University's strength displayed in the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. As a case study of response-phase contributions, this article also focuses on the Disaster Victim Identification (DVI) project, in which authors have been involved for nearly three years. View full abstract»

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  • Resilient ICT research based on lessons learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Page(s): 38 - 43
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    The creation of countermeasures against a large-scale disaster is an important focus of research for the future. This article briefly introduces some Japanese research and development activities for disaster-related technologies, including those carried out by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). First, we discuss lessons learned from the Great East Japan Earthquake that occurred on March 11, 2011. We show that the preferred communication tool in a disaster situation depends on the time that has elapsed after the disaster. We then summarize several research projects for developing robust and dependable communication networks, including an information distribution platform, and outline the research projects of NICT's Resilient ICT Research Center as well. View full abstract»

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  • Analysis of and proposal for a disaster information network from experience of the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Page(s): 44 - 50
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    Recently serious natural disasters such as earthquakes, tsunamis, typhoons, and hurricanes have occurred at many places around the world. The East Japan Great Earthquake on March 11, 2011 had more than 19,000 victims and destroyed a huge number of houses, buildings, loads, and seaports over the wide area of Northern Japan. Information networks and systems and electric power lines were also severely damaged by the great tsunami. Functions such as the highly developed information society, and residents' safety and trust were completely lost. Thus, through the lessons from this great earthquake, a more robust and resilient information network has become one of the significant subjects. In this article, our information network recovery activity in the aftermath of the East Japan Great Earthquake is described. Then the problems of current information network systems are analyzed to improve our disaster information network and system through our network recovery activity. Finally we suggest the systems and functions required for future large-scale disasters. View full abstract»

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  • How broadcasters used the internet: simulcasting at the time of the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Page(s): 51 - 55
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    On the heels of the Great East Japan Earthquake, NHK and some of the commercial broadcasters began to deliver disaster-related TV and radio news on the Internet via parallel transmit. Terrestrial television had never experienced parallel transmission of this magnitude. We recapitulate how, subsequent to the disaster, Japanese broadcasters used the Internet, particularly focusing on the role that parallel distribution played, while considering challenges that were brought to our attention. View full abstract»

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  • Security in wireless multimedia communications [Guest Editorial]

    Page(s): 56 - 57
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  • Exploiting multimedia services in mobile social networks from security and privacy perspectives

    Page(s): 58 - 65
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (931 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With the ever-increasing demands of multimedia services and the boom of smartphones, traditional online multimedia applications are extended to mobile users anywhere and anytime. However, the flourishing of multimedia services is still hindered by inherent security and privacy concerns. In this article, we investigate the security and privacy issues of multimedia services by studying a newly emerging multimedia-oriented mobile social network (MMSN), which helps users receive multimedia services not only from their online social communities but also from their social friends in the vicinity. Specifically, we first define the MMSN architecture, and identify the unique security and privacy challenges. Then we study three MMSN applications: content query, service evaluation, and content filtering. For each application, we present the specific security and privacy problems with the corresponding countermeasures. Finally, we propose some future research directions in the MMSN. View full abstract»

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  • Joint physical-application layer security for wireless multimedia delivery

    Page(s): 66 - 72
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (445 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In recent years, there have been increasing demands for the security of wireless multimedia applications. Essentially, wireless networks, compared to traditional wired networks, are more likely to suffer from malicious attacks. Most current security methods consider physical layer and application layer security technologies independently and separately. Usually, physical layer information is dynamic in wireless networks, and application layer information is related to wireless multimedia delivery. Importantly, both of them have significant impact on security performance. In this work, we propose a joint framework involving both the physical and application layer security technologies. Specifically, by exploiting the security capacity and signal processing technologies at the physical layer and the authentication and watermarking strategies at the application layer, the available network resources can be utilized efficiently. In addition, scalable multimedia security services can be maximized within the given multimedia delivery deadlines. In particular, this joint scheme can be implemented easily with low communication overhead, which facilitates its deployment in large-scale wireless multimedia systems. View full abstract»

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  • Security protection between users and the mobile media cloud

    Page(s): 73 - 79
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (287 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Mobile devices such as smartphones are widely deployed in the world, and many people use them to download/upload media such as video and pictures to remote servers. On the other hand, a mobile device has limited resources, and some media processing tasks must be migrated to the media cloud for further processing. However, a significant question is, can mobile users trust the media services provided by the media cloud service providers? Many traditional security approaches are proposed to secure the data exchange between mobile users and the media cloud. However, first, because multimedia such as video is large-sized data, and mobile devices have limited capability to process media data, it is important to design a lightweight security method; second, uploading and downloading multi-resolution images/videos make it difficult for the traditional security methods to ensure security for users of the media cloud. Third, the error-prone wireless environment can cause failure of security protection such as authentication. To address the above challenges, in this article, we propose to use both secure sharing and watermarking schemes to protect user's data in the media cloud. The secure sharing scheme allows users to upload multiple data pieces to different clouds, making it impossible to derive the whole information from any one cloud. In addition, the proposed scalable watermarking algorithm can be used for authentications between personal mobile users and the media cloud. Furthermore, we introduce a new solution to resist multimedia transmission errors through a joint design of watermarking and Reed- Solomon codes. Our studies show that the proposed approach not only achieves good security performance, but also can enhance media quality and reduce transmission overhead. View full abstract»

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  • Security threats to mobile multimedia applications: Camera-based attacks on mobile phones

    Page(s): 80 - 87
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    Today's mobile smartphones are very powerful, and many smartphone applications use wireless multimedia communications. Mobile phone security has become an important aspect of security issues in wireless multimedia communications. As the most popular mobile operating system, Android security has been extensively studied by researchers. However, few works have studied mobile phone multimedia security. In this article, we focus on security issues related to mobile phone cameras. Specifically, we discover several new attacks that are based on the use of phone cameras. We implement the attacks on real phones, and demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the attacks. Furthermore, we propose a lightweight defense scheme that can effectively detect these attacks. View full abstract»

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  • Network testing series [Series Editorial]

    Page(s): 88 - 89
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  • Substandard cell phones: impact on network quality and a new method to identify an unlicensed IMEI in the network

    Page(s): 90 - 96
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    The increase of counterfeit mobile phones in wireless networks on emerging markets is one of the reasons for the degradation in spectral efficiency. In some countries the sales of counterfeit/ substandard phones could represent as much as 15-20 percent of the market [1]. The motivation of this article is to have a better understanding of the impact of counterfeit phones on network performance and present a solution to identify these mobile devices. Several laboratory tests and implementations emulating a real cellular coverage were performed. Results showed that counterfeit phones have degraded quality service for the user and also impact other subscribers (14 dB sensitivity difference from the original). Additionally, higher dropped calls and access failures rates (up to three times more) were observed. A new method that can identify, notify the user of, and block counterfeit devices was implemented and tested in the laboratory. This article presents several aspects that impact network reliability, as well as an innovative method to manage the access of substandard devices to cellular networks that can bring more efficient usage of spectrum resources. View full abstract»

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  • An IP-based packet test environment for TD-LTE and LTE FDD

    Page(s): 97 - 103
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    In recent years, Long Term Evolution systems have been developed to replace 3G mobile networks. During LTE network deployment, it is essential that mobile operators and manufacturers conduct tests on user equipment and the base station (eNB). Besides conformance testing at the radio layer, it is also important to conduct network-layer performance tests between UE and eNB. This article develops an LTE test environment that can be used to test the IP-based packet performance for TD-LTE and LTE FDD. Specifically, we consider the latency and the throughput performance of IP, TCP, and VoIP (i.e., G.711) packet delivery. This multi-purpose test environment can be utilized to investigate the performance of the UE and/or eNBs of various manufacturers. Furthermore, we use this environment to compare TD-LTE and LTE FDD. The measurement results provide guidelines for UE and eNB vendors to improve their products, and operators to deploy their LTE networks and subsidized UE devices. View full abstract»

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  • Radio communications: components, systems, and networks [Series Editorial]

    Page(s): 112 - 113
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Sean Moore
Centripetal Networks