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American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Proceedings of the

Issue 9 • Date Sept. 1908

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • Proceedings of the AIEE September 1908

    Page(s): 1
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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): 1
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  • Transactions for 1907

    Page(s): 1
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  • Literary thieves

    Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • Application for election and transfer

    Page(s): 2
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  • Professor Anthony at Cornell

    Page(s): 3 - 5
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  • Closing session of the twenty-fifth annual convention of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Atlantic city, N. J., June 29–July 2, 1908

    Page(s): 5 - 8
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  • University branches

    Page(s): 8 - 12
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  • The advantages of membership in the American Institute of Electrical Engineers

    Page(s): 12 - 14
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  • Sections and branches

    Page(s): 14
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  • Associates elected and transferred

    Page(s): 15 - 18
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  • Personal

    Page(s): 19 - 20
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  • Books received

    Page(s): 20 - 21
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  • Officers and Board of Directors, 1908–1909

    Page(s): 22 - 26
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  • Methods for locating transpositions of wires and split pairs in telephone and telegraph cables

    Page(s): 1437 - 1448
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    Some of the telegraph companies demand that there shall be no transpositions of wires in any of the layers in a telegraph cable. By this is meant that the wires of every layer must have the same relative order at each end of the cable. There is usually a tracer or wire covered with different colored paper from the rest in every layer, and by counting from this tracer any particular wire can be located at any point in the cable. If a wire is fifth from the tracer in a clockwise direction at one end of the cable, it will be fifth from the tracer in a counter clockwise direction at the other end of the cable. By this general plan it becomes possible to identify wires without resorting to some of the common methods of testing. However, in order to be able to place implicit reliance in a scheme of identification of this sort, not only must the cables be manufactured correctly but the jointing must be made by skilled men who are careful to connect the wires of each layer in consecutive order, and as an extra precaution make repeated tests at both ends of the jointed sections as the work of splicing progresses. Even after exercising the greatest care, a transposition may occur. The object of the present article is to show how a fault of this kind can readily be located by some methods devised by the author. View full abstract»

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  • Calculation of the starting torque of single-phase induction motors with phase-splitting starting devices

    Page(s): 1449 - 1451
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    The starting torque of any induction motor is proportional to the product of the main field by the quadrature field, hence to the product of the main electromotive force by the quadrature electromotive force. The starting torque of a single-phase induction motor with a phase-splitting starting device can, therefore, be predetermined if the electromotive forces at the terminal are known. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion on “the determination of the economic location of sub-stations in electric railways”, at Atlantic city, N. J., July 1, 1908

    Page(s): 1452 - 1453
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  • Discussion on “comparative tests of lightning protection devices on the Taylor's Falls transmission system”, and “studies in lightning performance, season 1907.” New York, May 19, 1908

    Page(s): 1454 - 1462
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    H. W. Buck: The valuable data presented to-night include the most comprehensive and systematic record of lightning disturbances which has been presented to this Institute. In the old days of electrical transmission most of the trouble we had to cope with was due to the station apparatus itself, as the insulation of the lines was relatively high. As line voltages have risen with the progress of the art, the insulation of station apparatus has risen in proportion. Presumably lightning stresses have remained constant, so that at the present time we have insulation in our stations which perhaps on the high-voltage transmissions is high enough to withstand the original lightning surges, and the troubles seem to be shifting out upon the line itself. I think that this is the most noticeable feature of this paper. During the storms spoken of in the paper, many insulators were shattered, poles were shattered, and some cross-arms burned, and so on, and yet only one transformer bushing was damaged within the station. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 1919. The current retitled publication is IEEE Spectrum.

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