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American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Proceedings of the

Issue 8 • Date Aug. 1907

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • Proceedings of the AIEE August 1907

    Page(s): 1
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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): 1
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  • Frontispiece: Institute reception room [photo]

    Page(s): 1
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  • Engineering statesmen

    Page(s): 1
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  • Written discussion

    Page(s): 1 - 2
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  • References

    Page(s): 2
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  • Committee on local organizations — Annual report submitted to the Board of Directors, May 21, 1907

    Page(s): 3 - 6
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  • Sections and university branches

    Page(s): 6
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  • Membership

    Page(s): 6 - 9
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  • Personal

    Page(s): 9 - 12
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  • Books received

    Page(s): 12 - 13
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  • Officers and Board of Directors, 1906–1907

    Page(s): 14 - 17
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  • Regeneration of power with single-phase electric railway motors

    Page(s): 1233 - 1244
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    The conditions necessary in order that an electric motor may operate successfully in regenerating or restoring power to the supply circuit are: 1. The counter pressure generated by the motor must be greater than the impressed pressure of the supply circuit. 2. The value of this excess counter pressure must be under control and maintained in suitable relation to the impressed pressure. 3. There must be at the time other power-consuming devices connected to the supply circuit. View full abstract»

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  • Fractional pitch windings for induction motors

    Page(s): 1245 - 1263
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    For several years past some of our large manufacturers have used fractional pitch windings, for induction motors to a considerable extent, and for alternators to a lesser extent. View full abstract»

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  • Commutating-pole direct-current railway motors

    Page(s): 1265 - 1275
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    General. In order to appreciate the development and reasons for the existence of a commutating-pole railway motor, it is well to discuss in some degree some other developments. In the beginning, railway-motor designers had many difficulties to contend with. View full abstract»

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  • Track-circuit signaling on electrified roads

    Page(s): 1277 - 1292
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    Railroads signals may be divided into three general classes according to their functions: (a) Those which confer rights on trains, or restrict their rights, known as train-order signals; (b) Those which designate the route a train is to take, and insure the safe condition of all switches and opposing signals on such route known as interlocking signals; (c) Those which are used primarily for properly spacing trains, known as block signals. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion on “some facts and problems bearing on electric trunk-line operation,” at New York, May 21, 1907

    Page(s): 1293 - 1332
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    There are so many points on which I fully agree with Mr. Sprague that it is perhaps well at the outset to dwell on one matter where we appear to disagree, and that is the relation of those engaged in the conducting of trunk-line railroad operation to the electrical engineering profession which is now gazing with hungry eyes on that enticing field of new endeavor — the electrification of trunk-line railroads. Without intending to indulge in the sarcasm and pessimism ascribed to our friend, the editor of the Railroad Gazette, I do believe with him that the cause of electrical engineering would be much more rapidly advanced if an effort could be made to bring the steam railroad official more closely in touch with the practical side of the application of electricity to the art of transportation. It is true that in the past the majority of steam railroad men have rather looked upon electric railroads as beneath their notice, but recent important developments in the change of motive power on some of the more prominent railroads of the country have dispelled this idea; and I feel certain that all steam railroad officials are now looking upon the future possibilities of the electrification of steam railroad traffic with keen interest and with a full appreciation of the magnitude and dignity of the problem. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion on “lightning phenomena in electric circuits”, “protection against lightning, and the multigap lightning-arrester”, and “new principles in the design of lightning-arresters”, at New York, March 29, 1907

    Page(s): 1333 - 1351
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    Dr. Steinmetz gives a clear description and classification of the lightning phenomena that aid us greatly in understanding the problems and the methods proposed for meeting them. They are, however, the simple problems; there is yet to discuss what occurs when two sets of waves started from different points on a long transmission line eventually come together. Aside from the increased constants (capacity and self-induction) I think there will be additional difficulties, due to the fact that in a long-distance transmission line traversing a great area there may be a storm at a certain part of the line and clear weather at another part; or there may be two independent storms in different parts of the line, giving lightning effects which induce waves that meet and combine, and increase the effects. Otherwise there would not be so much difficulty in protecting fairly well a long and extensive low-potential distribution system. View full abstract»

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  • High-voltage direct-current and alternating-current systems for interurban railways

    Page(s): 1353 - 1366
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    The magnitude and direction of engineering development in apparatus for the electrical equipment of high-speed interurban railways is well illustrated by a study of the systems adopted by some of the more important lines recently built or now under construction. These systems may be divided into three classes, namely: 1. 600-volt, direct-current using either overhead trolley or third-rail. 2. 1200-volt, direct-current overhead trolley. 3. Single-phase, alternating current, 3300- or 6600-volt overhead trolley. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 1919. The current retitled publication is IEEE Spectrum.

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