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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 2014

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Education publication information

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  • Editorial: A New Direction for the IEEE Transactions on Education: Part II. Increasing the Relevance of Your Manuscript

    Page(s): 1 - 3
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  • Learning and Understanding System Stability Using Illustrative Dynamic Texture Examples

    Page(s): 4 - 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1710 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    System stability is a basic concept in courses on dynamic system analysis and control for undergraduate students with computer science backgrounds. Typically, this was taught using a simple simulation example of an inverted pendulum. Unfortunately, many difficult issues arise in the learning and understanding of the concepts of stability, instability, and marginal stability. Instead, the authors use an example from dynamic texture, a topic with which undergraduate students with computer science backgrounds are both familiar and comfortable. This example provides the opportunity for students with no access to mechanical or electronic equipment to learn system stability. In addition, the designed project also allows students to improve their knowledge in several fields, such as discrete-time dynamic system analysis, parameter identification of state-space models, and MATLAB programming. The assessment by students reveals that this project is interesting and useful for their studies. View full abstract»

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  • An Assessment of Remote Laboratory Experiments in Radio Communication

    Page(s): 12 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (919 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Today's electrical and computer engineering graduates need marketable skills to work with electronic devices. Hands-on experiments prepare students to deal with real-world problems and help them to comprehend theoretical concepts and relate these to practical tasks. However, shortage of equipment, high costs, and a lack of human resources for laboratory maintenance and assistance decrease the implementation capacity of hands-on training laboratories. At the same time, the Internet has become a common networking medium and is increasingly used to enhance education. In addition, at many sites, existing experimental systems are typically underutilized. These cost and efficient exploitation constraints can be resolved by the use of remote laboratories accessible through the Internet that can be shared and used at flexible times and from various locations. This paper is a description of a systematic assessment effort of the efficiency of remote laboratories in radio communication. The labs are offered to graduate and undergraduate students, and hands-on and remote experiences are compared. A dedicated remote experimentation system, eComLab, was developed to support the effort. View full abstract»

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  • Dissemination of the Phasor Method in Electrical Engineering in China

    Page(s): 20 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (623 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Synchrophasors, widely used in the monitoring and analysis of power systems, evolved from the phasor method presented by Charles Proteus Steinmetz in 1893. The phasor method is a mathematical method for solving linear sinusoidal steady-state circuits and time-varying electromagnetic fields. This paper traces the history and diffusion of the phasor method in the discipline of electrical engineering in China. In 1914, Sidney Roby Sheldon, an American teacher at the Government Institute of Technology of the Communications Ministry, Shanghai, China, introduced the phasor method to his students in his Alternating Currents course. The textbook used was Elements of Electrical Engineering (Volume II) by William Suddards Franklin and William Esty. In 1920, The Electrical Magazine published a paper “Complex number and its application” by Sijiu Shi (editor of the electrical engineering section of this periodical). This is the earliest example found of Chinese literature introducing the phasor method. In the 1930s, Principles of Alternating Currents, an American electrical engineering textbook that includes the phasor method, was translated by Chinese scholars; this Chinese version promoted the use of the phasor method in China's electrical engineering field. Alternating Current Circuits, authored by the Chinese university professor Pen Tung Sah and published in 1948, may be the earliest example of the phasor method being included in a Chinese electrical engineering textbook; it played an important role in popularizing the phasor method in China. View full abstract»

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  • Implementation of a Project-Based Telecommunications Engineering Design Course

    Page(s): 25 - 33
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1078 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes and discusses the implementation of a project-based graduate design course in telecommunications engineering. This course, which requires a combination of technical and soft skills for its completion, enables guided independent learning (GIL) and application of technical knowledge acquired from classroom learning. Its main implementation challenge is the need for instructors to define graduate-level GIL activities that are unique for the project objectives and scope. This process is required at both the system and subsystem levels. These activities must also satisfy the program learning outcomes and course outcomes (PLOs and COs). The course initiation, implementation, and management are first described from the instructor's perspective. Technical specifications and outcomes from a recently implemented project titled “A Human-Inspired Telecommunication System” is taken as a case study. Besides explaining the methodology used to evaluate both the course and the students, an empirical assessment of PLOs and COs against the associated educational activities is also presented. Results of a student exit survey, in which each instrument was mapped to specific COs, indicated that the intended course objectives had been accomplished and that there was a good level of student satisfaction. View full abstract»

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  • Experiential Learning of Digital Communication Using LabVIEW

    Page(s): 34 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (864 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses the design and implementation of laboratories and course projects using LabVIEW in an instrumentation course. The pedagogical challenge is to enhance students' learning of digital communication using LabVIEW. LabVIEW was extensively used in the laboratory sessions, which better prepared students for the course projects. Two course projects were designed to familiarize the students with virtual instrumentation, data acquisition, Modbus communication, and simple closed-loop control. One project involved the instrumentation and control of a brushed dc permanent magnet motor; the other involved the instrumentation and control of a small-scale temperature chamber. Students used one computer, functioning as a Modbus slave, to measure the motor speed or temperature inside the chamber and to turn the motor or lightbulbs on and off. Another computer, functioning as a Modbus master, reads the measurements using Modbus communication protocol via RS-485 wires, compared the measurements to the set points, made control decisions, and sent the commands to the Modbus slave for actuation. The effectiveness of student learning is analyzed using student survey data. View full abstract»

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  • Teaching RFID Information Systems Security

    Page(s): 42 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (335 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The future cyber security workforce needs radio frequency identification (RFID) information systems security ( INFOSEC ) and threat modeling educational materials. A complete RFID security course with new learning materials and teaching strategies is presented here. A new RFID Reference Model is used in the course to organize discussion of RFID, much as the open systems interconnection (OSI) model is used in a computer networking course. Students use a general-purpose threat modeling process named STRIDE and a risk analysis model named DREAD to determine and to mitigate security risks. Class modules on topics such as the threat modeling process and privacy can be integrated into fourth-year undergraduate or first-year graduate-level computer science and computer engineering courses such as network security, wireless security, computer networks, sensor/RFID networks, or network performance. View full abstract»

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  • Implantable Biomedical Microsystems: A New Graduate Course in Biomedical Circuits and Systems

    Page(s): 48 - 53
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (929 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    After more than two decades of research on the design and development of implantable biomedical microsystems, it is time now to organize research achievements in this area in a consolidated and pedagogical form. This paper introduces a new graduate course in advanced biomedical circuits and systems. Designed for graduate students with electrical and biomedical engineering backgrounds, this course provides a general overview of the multidisciplinary field of implantable biomedical microsystems. In addition to some introductory material on physiology and biology where needed, this course comprises extensive contents and in-depth discussions on both system- and circuit-level aspects of the design of implantable microsystems. Moreover, this course also deals with issues surrounding design for implantability and testability. Wireless interfacing, signal processing, microelectrode array fabrication, and circuit design for implantable neural recording microsystems are studied extensively. Various design aspects of neural stimulation microsystems, cochlear implants, and visual prostheses are also reviewed briefly. View full abstract»

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  • A Novel Instructional Approach to the Design of Standard Controllers: Using Inversion Formulae

    Page(s): 54 - 60
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1899 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes a range of design techniques for standard compensators (Lead-Lag networks and PID controllers) that have been applied to the teaching of many undergraduate control courses throughout Italy over the last twenty years, but that have received little attention elsewhere. These techniques hinge upon a set of simple formulas-herein referred to as Inversion Formulae -for the computation of the parameters of the controller as functions of the typical specifications of steady-state performance, stability margins, and crossover frequency. View full abstract»

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  • The Master's Thesis: An Opportunity for Fostering Presentation Skills

    Page(s): 61 - 68
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (738 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Presentation skills, such as oral expression and public speaking, have normally been relegated to the background in engineering degree programs. In recent years, however, the labor market has specifically demanded these kinds of skills in engineers. Accordingly, new engineering degrees, adapted to the goals of the Bologna Declaration or ABET criteria, consider presentation skills as being fundamental transferable skills. In practice, however, many engineering degree programs do not specifically foster these skills even though they are included in the syllabus. This paper proposes a presentation-skills training that uses the Master's thesis as an opportunity for fostering presentation-related skills. This activity has students deliver a scheduled series of rehearsals, in front of their classmates and tutors, for their officially assessed presentation of their Master's thesis work. The paper also presents a Web tool specifically designed for uploading recordings of the rehearsal presentations for feedback online as a complementary method for fostering presentation-related skills. Finally, the results of carrying out the proposed resource over a 4-year period from 2009 to 2013 are discussed; they show that students following the proposed methodology had higher than average marks, all receiving an A+, and 82% of them receiving an A+ with distinction. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Transactions on Education information for authors

    Page(s): C3
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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University