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Nanotechnology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 2013

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • [Masthead]

    Page(s): 2
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  • Lending a Hand [The Editor's Desk]

    Page(s): 4
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  • Stable Nanomanipulation Using Atomic Force Microscopy: A virtual nanohand for a robotic nanomanipulation system.

    Page(s): 6 - 11
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    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a promising tool for not only imaging and measuring matter at the nanoscale [1] but also manipulating and fabricating nano-objects [2], [3]. AFM offers multiple working modes for sensing and actuating with one versatile probe. It can easily switch between scanning and manipulating a nano-object either in an ambient atmosphere or in a liquid environment [4]. One of the important nanoparticle manipulations is the nanoparticle transfer, in which two movements of grasping and transferring are involved. Although the two movements are directly in conflict with the single probe-based mechanism, an AFM-based robotic nanomanipulation system with a virtual nanohand has been developed to solve the conflicting issue of movements. In this article, we show how an AFM-based virtual nanohand is designed to grasp and transfer a nanoparticle at the nanometer scale stably, efficiently, and effectively. View full abstract»

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  • National Program on Nano Technology: Fostering the advancement and industrialization of nanotechnology in Taiwan.

    Page(s): 12 - 19
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    The National Program on Nanotechnology (NPNT), launched in 2003, is a landmark project in Taiwan to promote the scientific and technological development of the country's academic and industrial sectors. This article will provide an overview of the NPNT, including the missions, research and technology achievements, academia-industry and international collaborations, and future goals. Through the effort made by the NPNT, the promotion of industrial investments and economic competitiveness will be fostered by a continuous industry revolution in terms of resource development and realization of academic research results in practical products. The ultimate goal of the commercialization of nanotechnology can be accomplished in Taiwan. View full abstract»

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  • Nanotube Devices for Digital Profiling: A focus on cancer biomarkers and circulating tumor cells.

    Page(s): 20 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1911 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were first discovered in 1869 in the blood of patients suffering from metastatic disease by an Australian physician, Thomas Ashworth, using optical microscopy [1]. The current understanding is that these CTCs mediate the spread of cancer at distant sites, including the lungs, liver, bones, and brain. CTCs are shed by primary and metastatic cancers in the range of 1-77,200/ml [2], [3]. Recent clinically approved techniques for CTC detection include Veridex from Cell Search [4], the CTC chip [5], and the ADNA test [6], [7], to name a few. Table 1 presents a list of CTC detection methodologies and their U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval stages. Although these methods are impressive, none are handheld point-of-care devices; the test cannot be administered in the clinic, with results available in a few minutes both for CTCs and cancer biomarkers. Therefore, with this objective in mind, we present our results on the development of nanotube devices for detection of both protein biomarkers and CTCs using nanotube devices. View full abstract»

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  • Carbon Nanotube-Based Artificial Tracheal Prosthesis: Carbon nanocomposite implants for patient-specific ENT care.

    Page(s): 27 - 31
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    We have developed the first patient-specific carbon nanotube (CNT) composite artificial tracheal implant tested on a porcine model in vivo. The experimental subject has survived with the implant with no apparent problems. Carbon nanocomposite material and the patient-specific approach have also been used to develop a voice prosthesis device as well as new microclips for wound closure. This article presents our experimental investigation with the carbon nanocomposite materials for constructing patient-specific ear, nose, and throat (ENT) implants. View full abstract»

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  • 2013 Index IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine Vol. 7

    Page(s): 33 - 37
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