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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date March 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Comments on "Language design for program manipulation"

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 218 - 219
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (259 KB)  

    The paper by E.A.T. Merks et al. (see ibid., vol. 18, p. 19-32, 1992) "Language design for program manipulation" identifies design principles for a procedural or object-oriented language whose programs will be easier to manipulate. However, it neglects to relate these design principles to existing, broader, design principles, and in some instances omits good examples of languages meeting their criteria. The author relates the new principles to more fundamental design principles, and provides the needed examples of languages meeting their criteria. Together these additions can better help designers of new programming languages that are amenable to manipulation.<> View full abstract»

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  • Specifying transaction-based information systems with regular expressions

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 207 - 217
    Cited by:  Patents (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (952 KB)  

    The work is about the formal specification of transaction-based, interactive information systems. A transaction is a task that the user can execute independently, and the system can be defined as a partially ordered set of transactions. The general framework is the transformational paradigm, based on the classical Waterfall development model (W.W. Royce, 1970). The stages are systems analysis, software specification, design, and implementation. The systems analysis and software specification stages are covered. An informal, transaction-oriented method for systems analysis is proposed. The resulting system specification involves two parts: a high-level specification of each transaction and a formal specification of the system's control flow, i.e., the order of execution of the transactions. The system's control flow is expressed in a formal language describing concurrent regular expressions built on transaction names. At the software specification stage, some operational requirements, such as connect/disconnect transactions and the application of the all-or-nothing principle, are added to the system specification. Then a serial product automaton (SPA) is used to transform the concurrent expression into a single regular expression. This result is proven to be consistent with the system specification View full abstract»

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  • Software measurement: a necessary scientific basis

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 199 - 206
    Cited by:  Papers (71)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (864 KB)  

    Software measurement, like measurement in any other discipline, must adhere to the science of measurement if it is to gain widespread acceptance and validity. The observation of some very simple, but fundamental, principles of measurement can have an extremely beneficial effect on the subject. Measurement theory is used to highlight both weaknesses and strengths of software metrics work, including work on metrics validation. We identify a problem with the well-known Weyuker properties (E.J. Weyuker, 1988), but also show that a criticism of these properties by J.C. Cherniavsky and C.H. Smith (1991) is invalid. We show that the search for general software complexity measures is doomed to failure. However, the theory does help us to define and validate measures of specific complexity attributes. Above all, we are able to view software measurement in a very wide perspective, rationalising and relating its many diverse activities View full abstract»

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  • Automating output size and reuse metrics in a repository-based computer-aided software engineering (CASE) environment

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 169 - 187
    Cited by:  Papers (10)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1640 KB)  

    Measurement of software development productivity is needed in order to control software costs, but it is discouragingly labor-intensive and expensive. Computer-aided software engineering (CASE) technologies-especially repository-based, integrated CASE-have the potential to support the automation of this measurement. We discuss the conceptual basis for the development of automated analyzers for function point and software reuse measurement for object-based CASE. Both analyzers take advantage of the existence of a representation of the application system that is stored within an object repository, and that contains the necessary information about the application system. We also discuss metrics for software reuse measurement, including reuse leverage, reuse value, and reuse classification that are motivated by managerial requirements and the efforts, within industry and the IEEE, to standardize measurement. The functionality and the analytical capabilities of state-of-the-art automated software metrics analyzers are illustrated in the context of an investment banking industry application that is similar to systems deployed at the New York City-based investment bank where these tools were developed and tested View full abstract»

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  • Designing an agent synthesis system for cross-RPC communication

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 188 - 198
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1052 KB)  

    Remote procedure call (RPC) is the most popular paradigm used today to build distributed systems and applications. As a consequence, the term “RPC” has grown to include a range of vastly different protocols above the transport layer. A resulting problem is that programs often use different RPC protocols, cannot be interconnected directly, and building a solution for each case in a large heterogeneous environment is prohibitively expensive. We describe the design of a system that can synthesize programs (RPC agents) to accommodate RPC heterogeneities. Because of its synthesis capability, the system also facilitates the design and implementation of new RPC protocols through rapid prototyping. We have built a prototype system to validate the design and to estimate the agent development costs and cross-RPC performance. The evaluation shows that the synthesis approach provides a more general solution than existing approaches do, and with lower software development and maintenance costs, while maintaining reasonable cross-RPC performance View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org