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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing

Issue 4 • Date Oct.-Dec. 2013

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • Front Cover

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s): c1
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  • Table of Contents

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):c2 - 1
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  • From the Editor's Desk

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):2 - 3
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  • Appropriation and Independence: BTM,Burroughs, and IBM at the Advent of the Computer Industry

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):5 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (769 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Comparisons between the early British and US computer industries invariably have focused on the differential development of the British Tabulating Machine Company (BTM) and IBM. In this article, the author seeks to refocus examination of BTM (and comparisons of it to IBM) within the context of an American competitor somewhat similar in size, customer base, and organizational capabilities in electr... View full abstract»

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  • Early Language and Compiler Developments at IBM Europe: A Personal Retrospection

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):18 - 30
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1319 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Until about 1970, programming languages and their compilers were perhaps the most active system software area. Because of its technical position at that time, IBM made significant contributions to this field. This retrospective concentrates on two languages, Algol 60 and PL/I, because with them compiler development reached an historical peak within IBM's European laboratories. The Boeblingen, Hurs... View full abstract»

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  • "Carrying a Bag": Memoirs of an IBM Salesman, 1974-1981

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):32 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (935 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    This article is the memoir of an IBM salesman working in the Data Processing Division, 1974-1981. This was a Golden Age for account management, sales of mainframes, all during the period of IBM's antitrust suit. The author provides insights into the operations and culture of IBM's sales history. View full abstract»

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  • This Is Not a Computer: Negotiating the Microprocessor

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):48 - 54
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (735 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The Intel 4004 μ-Computer is the earliest known microprocessor-based hardware distributed by Intel. This article relates the information concerning the 4004 μ-Computer in an effort to gain a more complete historical perspective on the liminal period in the corporate history of Intel when, soon after the introduction of its first microprocessor, the company was wrestling with the "one... View full abstract»

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  • Computer Dealer Demos: Selling Home Computers with Bouncing Balls and Animated Logos

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):56 - 68
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    Computer dealer demos, such as Boing Ball for the Commodore Amiga, were used to impress trade show audiences and retail customers. Dealer demos, such as those used by Commodore International, Atari, and Apple, illustrate how the home computer was socially constructed as a consumer commodity through the interdependent activities of software companies and user communities rather than simply through ... View full abstract»

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  • Burroughs Algol at Stanford University, 1960-1963

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):69 - 73
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  • Edward Feigenbaum

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):74 - 81
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  • Events and Sightings

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):82 - 85
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  • Reviews [4 books reviewed]

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):86 - 89
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  • Computers, Information, and Everyday Life

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s): 96
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Computing Now [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s): c3
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  • Digital Magazines [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s): c4
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  • [Masthead]

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s): 4
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  • myComputer [advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s): 31
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  • Membership [advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s): 55
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  • 2013 Annual Author and Subject Index

    Publication Year: 2013, Page(s):90 - 93
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Annals of the History of Computing serves as a record of vital contributions which recount, preserve, and analyze the history of computing and the impact of computing on society.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Nathan Ensmenger
Indiana University, School of Informatics & Computing
nensmeng@indiana.edu