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Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Feb.-March 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • Molecular electronics: science and technology for the future

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 25 - 32
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1196 KB)  

    The following topics are discussed: the emergence of molecular electronics research; nanometer scale components; assembly techniques; synthetic organic molecules and biomolecules; the role of protein engineering; hierarchy of biological information processing; common infrastructure for molecular electronics, biosensor and molecular actuator technology; interfacing problems; molecular self-assembly and self-repair.<> View full abstract»

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  • Electroactive and photochromic molecular materials for wires, switches and memories

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 45 - 57
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1358 KB)  

    Properties of synthetic electroactive and photochromic molecular systems are described, with particular emphasis on microscopic processes controlling these properties. Both low-molecular weight and polymeric materials can be (and many have already been) used as conducting systems. The chemical flexibility of many molecular systems also allows for using them as information-processing materials, whose action is based on their photochromic properties. A relation between properties of individual molecules and those of macroscopic molecular systems allows one to envisage construction of molecular-scale devices. However, due to limitations associated with technological problems (construction of molecular-scale elements, their addressing, quantum-mechanical (size) limitations, etc.), the construction of such elements is still a problem that awaits solution.<> View full abstract»

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  • Photosynthesis mimics as molecular electronic devices

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 58 - 66
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1057 KB)  

    As illustrated in this brief survey, the field of artificial photosynthesis has developed to the point where molecular scale photovoltaics giving high quantum yields of long-lived, energetic charge separated states can be designed using the principles governing natural photosynthesis, and then synthesized and studied. In contrast to the large progress in this area, the study of how to incorporate such devices into electrical circuits is still in its infancy. Finally, these same principles may be employed in the design of relatively sophisticated optoelectronic switches and logic elements. Although only a few prototypes have as yet been reported. The field is ripe for further development.<> View full abstract»

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  • Photovoltaic effects in biomembranes/spl minus/reverse-engineering naturally occurring molecular optoelectronic devices

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 75 - 93
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2744 KB)  

    Discusses the fundamental principles of the fast photoelectric effect and its applications to molecular electronics research. The principles are illustrated with experimental data obtained from reconstituted bacteriorhodopsin membranes. The following topics are considered: Halobacterium halobium; light-induced charge separation; equivalent circuit analysis; the concept of intelligent materials; reverse engineering of visual rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin; bacteriorhodopsin as an advanced bioelectronic material; the role of protein engineering; the interface problem.<> View full abstract»

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  • Molecular interfacing for protein molecular devices and neurodevices

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 94 - 102
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (978 KB)  

    Several protein-based molecular biodevices have been made possible by the molecular interfacing technology that enables proteins to electronically communicate with the conventional electronic materials, such as metals or semiconductors. The molecular interfacing technology, however, should be extensively improved to allow for precise designs at the single-molecule level. The molecular-scale design of protein-based molecular biodevices may be accomplished by further innovation in molecular interfacing technology. It is also important to pursue the possibility of utilizing the self-organization of biomolecules for information processing, and to make it possible to create a molecular network-based biodevice without any preprogrammed wiring among its molecules. Major advances have recently been made in basic technology. Yet, it will take some time to construct a prototype neurodevice in which neurons are utilized as components. Further investigations should focus on the development of molecular interfaces that offer bilateral communication between neurons and conventional electronic materials.<> View full abstract»

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  • Molecular and supramolecular systems for sensing and actuation

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 103 - 111
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1167 KB)  

    Highlights some of the latest findings and research avenues in molecular sensors and actuators and also some of the problems encountered in developing such devices. The following topics are discussed: molecular sensors; biological molecular sensors (including immunosensors); artificial senses (including smell, taste, touch); Langmuir-Blodgett films; synthetic sensors (including gas sensors); molecular actuators (including microactuators); nanoactuators; doping of conducting polymers.<> View full abstract»

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  • Computer simulation of the human breathing process

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 115 - 124
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (887 KB)  

    The following topics are discussed: lung motion and gas flow; model of the nose and mouth; model of the tracheobronchial tree (trachea and respiratory pathways); model of the lung; polynomial representation of lung stiffness; model of pleural compartment; comparison of predicted breathing patterns with experimental data; block diagram analysis of tracheobronchial tree and alveolar and pleural compartments.<> View full abstract»

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  • Three-dimensional surface digitizer for facial contour capture

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 125 - 128
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (598 KB)  

    To widen the applicability of a 3D surface digitizer, a simple and low cost system is designed here, which can easily capture the surface contours of the human face. It can reconstruct 3D images and provide much information for the quantitative assessment of facial contours.<> View full abstract»

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  • Biosignal pattern recognition and interpretation systems. 3. Methods of classification

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 129 - 135
    Cited by:  Papers (5)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (612 KB)  

    The following topics are discussed: Bayes/minimum distance classifiers; maximum likelihood classification estimation; k-nearest neighbor classification; entropy criteria; syntactic techniques; string matching; the Cocke-Younger-Kasami parsing algorithm; syntactic learning; finite-state automata; neural network classification techniques; learning vector quantization; cluster swapping; hierarchial clustering procedures.<> View full abstract»

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  • Engineering in genomics/spl minus/combinatorial methods for DNA physical mapping

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 146 - 147
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (345 KB)  

    To build a physical map biologists use different biochemical techniques to derive indirect information about the map and combinatorial methods to reconstruct the map from these data. Several experimental approaches to DNA physical mapping exist, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. They lead to different combinatorial problems but unfortunately, for most of these problems polynomial algorithms are still unknown; moreover, many of them are NP-complete. To solve some of these problem a number of combinatorial techniques have been suggested, in particular: homometric sets analysis, interval graphs, flows in networks, separation theory and minimum cycles mean in graphs. The author discusses: small-scale mapping; probed partial digestion; progress toward a basic map.<> View full abstract»

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  • Mutated bacteriorhodopsins-versatile media in optical image processing

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 67 - 74
    Cited by:  Papers (3)  |  Patents (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (928 KB)  

    Mutated bacteriorhodopsins are considered as versatile media in optical image processing. The following topics are discussed: the biological function of bacteriorhodopsin (BR); the photocycle of BR; light-controlled absorption of BR films; BR films in transmission- and reflection-type dynamic holograms; holographic interferometry (image processing in the time domain); holographic pattern recognition (image processing in the space domain) View full abstract»

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  • Organized monolayer assemblies-their role in constructing supramolecular devices and in modeling evolution of early life

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 33 - 44
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1092 KB)  

    The following topics are considered: a simple supramolecular device; arranging molecules to form a supramolecular device; energy transfer in designed monolayer assemblies; electron transfer in designed monolayer assemblies; monolayer assemblies for elucidating the nature of photographic sensitization; exciton motion in a monolayer and its use for chemical sensing and signal amplification; monolayer assemblies to study design principles of photoinduced electron pumps; the lock-and-key concept and the programmed-environmental-change concept; origin of life-like systems viewed as an engineering problem View full abstract»

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  • Point of view-the engineering profession: is it friendlier for women?

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 15 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (448 KB)  

    The author shares some reflections on the engineering profession and discusses how we can improve the climate and culture for the women who choose this nontraditional occupation. To understand this issue adequately, it is useful to discuss the barriers that often prevent many young women from considering a career in engineering, present arguments on why Canada needs more women in this field and provide an overview of the situation in the workplace and within the technical and professional societies View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine contains articles on current technologies and methods used in biomedical and clinical engineering.

 

This Magazine ceased publication in 2010. The current retitled publication is IEEE Pulse.

Full Aims & Scope