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American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Proceedings of the

Issue 6 • Date June 1909

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  • Proceedings of the AIEE June 1909

    Page(s): 1
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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): 1
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  • Report of Board of Directors

    Page(s): 1
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  • Announcement of the twenty-sixth annual convention, Frontenac, N. Y., June 28 to July 1, 1909

    Page(s): 2 - 4
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  • Membership

    Page(s): 4 - 11
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  • The satellite systems of primary or pioneer inventions

    Page(s): 12 - 13
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  • Electrical expert (wireless telegraphy and telephony). Navy department, June 9, 1909

    Page(s): 13 - 14
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  • Sections and branches

    Page(s): 14 - 23
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  • Personal

    Page(s): 23 - 26
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  • Obituary

    Page(s): 26
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  • Officers and Board of Directors, 1908–1909

    Page(s): 27 - 30
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  • Contents of section II

    Page(s): 1
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  • Apparatus used for testing condenser type insulation for high-tension terminals to 225,000 volts auditorium of the engineers' building, New York, April 9, 1909

    Page(s): 2
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  • Output and regulation in long-distance lines

    Page(s): 483 - 508
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    The limitations of the power transmission line as to distance, power, and voltage, and its characteristics as to voltage-variation and energy-loss, have always excited a great deal of interest in the electrical art. The subject has been treated by a number of prominent engineers in its various phases, notable among these being Scott, Perrine, Steinmetz, and Mershon. These men and others have done pioneer work and have outlined the general limiting conditions of transmission. There are some of the relations and peculiarities of the long line, however, that are of importance and interest which have not, to the writer's knowledge, been clearly presented before electrical engineers. It is the object of the present paper to discuss some of these features, more especially the line-output, regulation or voltage-variation, and the line energy-loss. View full abstract»

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  • Calculation of the high-tension line

    Page(s): 509 - 554
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    Neglecting matters of cost, the electrical performance of the high-tension transmission line becomes the critical factor as the quantity of power and distance of transmission become large. The loss and variation of voltage and, to a lesser extent, perhaps, the loss of energy in the line tend to become the dominating features. A careful study of these characteristics is thus most important in planning such a transmission. It is the purpose of the present paper to discuss the calculation of the high-tension line as relating to the important matters of regulation and energy line loss, and with especial reference to the unusually long and high-power lines. For this purpose certain new formulas suited for practical calculations are derived. View full abstract»

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  • The resistance and reactance of armored cables

    Page(s): 555 - 564
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    It has been asserted frequently that no form of iron protective covering is permissible for single conductors carrying alternating currents. Experience and simple calculation show this assertion to be well founded with regard to even the thinnest walls, if such walls form a completely closed magnetic circuit about the conductor. In a recent single-phase railway installation it was necessary to carry the trolley circuit across a drawbridge and the nature of the traffic through the draw rendered it advisable to armor the cables, several of which were to be installed for reserve and emergency. Obviously, the use of single-conductor, steel-armored cables was permissible if the reactance and losses in the armor were not prohibitive. There being an apparent absence of data on the subject, and some opinion adverse to the use of such cables, the values of reactance were calculated as explained below. The results showed that even at 60 cycles, and with outgoing and return cables placed close together, the reactance would not be serious; and the subsequent measurements indicate that in cables as manufactured the effect is considerably less than the calculated value, so that for purposes similar to that mentioned the use of the cables is entirely practical. View full abstract»

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  • Reduction in capacity of polyphase motors due to unbalancing in voltage

    Page(s): 565 - 578
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    It is well-known that polyphase motors of both induction and synchronous types overheat when supplied from circuits in which the ideal conditions of voltage balance and phase angle are not maintained. In order to determine definitely the performance under other than ideal conditions, and to ascertain the points at which overheating commences, a series of tests was run under varying conditions of voltage unbalance, unsymmetrical angular relations between phases, and combinations of these two. View full abstract»

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  • Calculation of iron losses in dynamo electric machinery

    Page(s): 579 - 587
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    It is well known that the iron losses in all kinds of electric motors and generators are invariably much greater than those calculated from iron-loss curves, such as are obtained from tests of samples of iron, unless an allowance is made for additional losses. View full abstract»

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  • Comparative costs of 25-cycle and 60-cycle alternators

    Page(s): 589 - 603
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    The statement is frequently made that 25-cycle alternators are more expensive than 60-cycle machines built for the same output, speed, voltage, and phase. A considerable difference of opinion exists at the present time as to how much more the low-frequency machine should cost than the corresponding high-frequency machine. When an attempt is made to analyze conditions, by examining the cost records of machines built by a large manufacturing company, one is confronted by a maze of figures which assist but little toward solving the problem. This is not at all surprising when one considers the many changes which have accompanied the rapid development of alternating-current generators. Some machines have a relatively great amount of iron, while others have a relatively great amount of copper; there is considerable difference in the results obtained from the various methods used for ventilating alternators; some are much more liberal as regards heating, or voltage margin, or regulation, than others; the excitation differs appreciably in machines for nearly the same rating; some were built when material and labor were high, etc. In this paper an attempt has been made to eliminate, as far as possible, some of these variables. View full abstract»

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  • The heating of induction motors

    Page(s): 605 - 631
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    The object of this paper is to show the limitations imposed on the designer of induction motors by the heating of the machine, and also to show how this heating may be predetermined. View full abstract»

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  • Function of fly-wheels in connection with electrically operated rolling mills

    Page(s): 633 - 642
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    For all kinds of motor drives and particularly for rolling-mill service, where the load conditions are very unstable, the use of a suitable fly-wheel is of great importance. As is well known, the function of a fly-wheel is to take up the sudden shocks and equalize the unsteady loads as much as practicable in order to produce the cheapest installation and obtain the most satisfactory and economical operation. The smallest size of motor and the minimum capacity of the generating plant are obtained when the action of the fly-wheel is such that the load on the motor is constant and equal to the average of all the loads. To a certain extent this will be impossible in rolling mills, and it will be the problem for the engineer to determine the most suitable size of fly-wheel, motor, and generating plant with the auxiliary equipments. View full abstract»

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  • Repulsion motor with variable-speed shunt characteristics

    Page(s): 643 - 653
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    A characteristic feature of the electrical developments of late years has been the extension of the use of alternating-current to every field where it is practicable. The reasons for this preference for alternating current are so well known that reference need only be made: first, to the advantages of the distribution system; and second, to the fact that the best and most reliable of all motors is the induction motor. View full abstract»

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  • Alternator for one hundred thousand cycles

    Page(s): 655 - 668
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    Before entering into a description of the form of generator dealt with in this paper, it may be of interest to give a short review of the history of the high-frequency alternator. Heretofore the 10,000-cycle machine has represented the highest frequency in commercial use. Such a machine was developed by one of the electrical manufacturing companies in 1900 and a number of them are now in service. A similar machine for 10,000 cycles was described by Lamme in a paper before the Institute in 1901.∗ Reference may be made particularly to a paper by Dudell read before the Physical Society of London, giving a synopsis of his work with this kind of apparatus and describing the experiments made by him. View full abstract»

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  • The purchase of fuel on a British thermal unit basis

    Page(s): 669 - 680
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    The boiler plant of the traction company which operates the street-car system of Cleveland, Ohio, is representative of modern practice in both the nature of the equipment installed and the means employed in handling and firing coal. Of the total cost of manufacturing a kilowatt-hour in this plant, exclusive of investment charges, taxes and insurance, the fuel item amounts substantially to 70 per cent. The calorific value of the fuel used is obviously of the utmost importance, and to insure a supply of coal having a high thermal value is therefore greatly to be desired. This may be accomplished by making use of one of three means which are at our command: View full abstract»

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  • Report of the Board of Directors for the fiscal year ending April 30, 1909

    Page(s): 681 - 698
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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 1919. The current retitled publication is IEEE Spectrum.

Full Aims & Scope