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American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Proceedings of the

Issue 9 • Date Sept. 1912

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • Directors' meeting August 8, 1912

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 373 - 374
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  • Visiting member privileges with foreign electrical engineering societies

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 374
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  • Membership

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 375 - 380
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  • Past branch meetings

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 380 - 391
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  • Associates transferred to grade of member, August 8, 1912

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 391 - 392
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  • Personal

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 392
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  • Library accessions

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 392 - 393
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  • Officers and Board of Directors 1912–1913

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 394 - 400
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  • Proceedings of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Section II — Papers, discussions and reports

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 401
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  • Contents of section II

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 402
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  • The debt we owe to Henry as a scientist

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 1809 - 1816
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  • Electricity in the Portland cement industry

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 1817 - 1836
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    There are probably many persons who can recall the time when Portland cement was considered to be a luxury in building all but the finest and greatest structures, owing to its high cost, and to a certain extent, to the uncertainty of the quality of the product. During the last twelve years those connected with the industry have been working hard on improvements in the methods of manufacture, and the improvement in quality and reduction in price speedily led to a great increase in the consumption of cement. These improvements were rendered possible by the introduction of the rotary kiln, and also by improvements in the grinding of refractory materials, which have had a much more serious study during that period than at any time previously; improvements in conveying machinery have also had not a little to do with the economical manufacture of Portland cement. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion on “arc vs. tungsten street lighting in small towns” (Stephens), Portland, Ore., April 16, 1912. (see proceedings for May, 1912)

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 1837 - 1848
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    Gano Dunn: It is a deep satisfaction to see that the author of this paper has found in the Institute the forum where it may be presented and discussed instead of finding that forum in the Illuminating Engineering Society. The author followed good precedent. Illumination has been a close cousin if not a nearer relative to electrical engineering, and I think it always will be. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion on “irrigation in the Spokane valley” (Corbett), Portland, Ore., April 16, 1912. (see proceedings for April 1912)

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 1849 - 1854
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    J. B. Fisken: To show what electrical engineering has done, I might state that the first time I saw the Spokane valley was twenty-five years ago, and I don't think there were six houses in the whole 35 miles. The valley was covered with bunch grass, which was considered only good for the Indians to feed to their cayuses. I had a request from a prominent member of this Institute to make some inquiries as to prices about two years ago, and I found prices for irrigated lands ten miles from Spokane ran from $800 to $1,000 an acre. When I first saw it, I could have bought the whole place for $2.50 an acre. I say that merely to illustrate what irrigation has done in the Spokane valley, and to encourage others who have had a chance to exploit it. Mr. Corbett has omitted to show one thing on the diagram in his paper to which attention might be called. There is one place up there where there are arranged radially at the foot of the shaft four chambers, the idea being that one pump was all that was required to start with. That plant could have been quadrupled without any additional expense in walling the chambers. Mr. Corbett states that there is a rate at present of $4 per month, per kv-a. He does not state whether the charge is by the month during the irrigation season or the rate of $48 a year; the discussion on that point has not brought this out. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion on “automatic private branch exchange development in San Francisco” (Deakin), Portland, Ore., April 17, 1912. (see proceedings for April, 1912)

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 1855 - 1862
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    H. M, Friendly: I ask if Mr. Deakin has ever considered the use of a private branch exchange having a limit of 170 stations instead of the 90 station limit in order to obviate having to use second selectors. In Chicago, I saw the switch that the manufacturers had designed, but I had no knowledge of its practical use. I also saw one at Columbus, Ohio, they were testing. The switch differed somewhat from the ordinary connector switch known as ten levels up and ten horizontal. This switch had twelve levels up and nineteen levels horizontal, in that manner you could obtain one hundred and ninety terminals. Of course, 1 assume Mr. Deakin would have to kill the top terminal, that is the naught level in order to facilitate intercommunication. I would like to ask if that kind of equipment has ever been figured on, and if it has been successful? View full abstract»

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  • Discussion on “the design of telephone pole lines for conditions west of the Rocky Mountains” (Griswold) Portland, Ore., April 17, 1912. (see proceedings for May, 1912)

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 1863 - 1866
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    H. Y. Hall: I ask Mr. Griswold what has been the experience of the telephone companies in the use of concrete particularly, and what has been the effect of the use of concrete on the butt rot. That is, under the weather conditions, applied under similar conditions that exist in the west, and also in the different soils. The paper states “It is the practice to allow the pole to reach approximately a safety factor of one before replacing.” Would that apply to all the poles in the line, or to just an occasional pole? I take it that would be rather unsafe to apply a factor of one to a whole line of poles; you might to an occasional pole. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion on “plant efficiency — an analysis of the losses of a hydroelectric system” (Ross), Portland, Ore., April 18, 1912. (see proceedings for May, 1912)

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 1867 - 1872
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    Gano Dunn: It is startling indeed to see the resulting efficiencies so carefully and accurately computed as have been computed in this paper, and it is also startling to see a considerable difference in the amount of this total efficiency from what probably it would have been given in the prospectus of a hydroelectric company had this company been in the course of financing instead of in actual operation. In one table there are given certain efficiencies of impulse units and certain turbine units, and both seem considerably low. If I understand Mr. Ross' use of the figures right, these statistics indicate lower than full load efficiencies. Am I right, Mr. Ross? View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 1919. The current retitled publication is IEEE Spectrum.

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