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American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Proceedings of the

Issue 8 • Date Aug. 1912

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Speeches at the A. I. E. E. Annual Banquet

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 321 - 337
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  • Going value

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 337 - 353
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    Engineering and economics were not supposed formerly to have any close or intimate relation, and prior to the last decade the realm of engineering was popularly understood to lie within the confines of applied natural science. But the decade just completed has witnessed a very important change in the early point of view, brought about almost entirely by the new problems which have sprung into existence with the rapid development of our public utilities. The engineer is now called upon to aid in the solution of the broad question of regulating our public service corporations, and there he rinds himself in contact not only with the law but that more interesting field of political science or economics, and almost of necessity he must absorb a good deal of both. A very able attorney once remarked that a successful engineer could never hope to evade the lawyers or the witness chair, and now perhaps we can go farther and say that sooner or later he will inevitably meet the political economist, in substance if not in form. View full abstract»

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  • The death of energy and the second law of thermodynamics, with particular reference to the thermodynamics of the atmosphere

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 354 - 356
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  • Main line electrification

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 356 - 358
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  • Past section meetings

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 358 - 364
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  • Personal

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 365
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  • Library accessions

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 366
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  • Officers and Board of Directors, 1912–1913

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 367 - 369
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  • Proceedings of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers: Section II — Papers, discussions and reports

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 371
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  • Contents of section II

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 372
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  • The relation of electrical engineering to other professions: President's address

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 1721 - 1728
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  • Central station electric power for railroad operation

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 1729 - 1739
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    Every engineering operation seeks to accomplish some practical result, which is measured by its financial worth or capacity to earn money by saving labor in doing something useful. There are no exceptions to this, but for railroad work, which will be the subject tonight, we often have to look further and deeper for the full measure of worth, than is usual in any other matters with which I am familiar. View full abstract»

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  • Economies in railway operation

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 1741 - 1767
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    Never before in the history of modern industrialism has there been such a stupendous effort made by every one for high efficiency as at the present time. It is the keynote of every convention; the proceedings of the Institute and other engineering societies are full of it; magazines and daily papers are devoting a great deal of space to the subject. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion on “some notes on isolated plants” (Moses), New York, January 12, 1912. (see proceedings for January, 1912)

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 1768 - 1790
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    R. P. Bolton: I will draw attention to some of the features which the author has introduced as being of an informative nature and upon which you are invited to base future action and practise, and of which the diagrams presented purport to be indexes or guides. A casual observation shows that they omit consideration of a very important element of variation in output and demand on the part of these appliances. They seem to be based upon the sole consideration as to whether electricity be purchased or be manufactured, in the case of those on the left side of the page, and on the further consideration, in the case of the right-hand diagrams, of whether a certain amount of steam, more or less, would be required and provided by the apparent electrical output. The isolated plant, however, operates under summer conditions and under winter conditions, the demand for steam heat being climatic, intermittent, and irregular, while the demand for electric lighting is also intermittent and irregular — therefore how can conditions as laid down in the diagrams be used to determine the relative proportions or even the kind of apparatus to be installed in different plants? It is an open question whether or not it is desirable for steam-driven fans to be installed for indirect heating systems in connection with purchased electricity. The conditions might be such that it would be highly undesirable from an economic standpoint to make such a combination, and more particularly so if the process involved the employment of extra labor, which after all is the main element to be considered in connection with all the items in these diagrams, and one which does not appear in them at all. View full abstract»

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  • Discussion on “some problems of high-voltage transmissions” (Steinmetz) and “characteristics of protective relays” (Hewlett). New York, March 8, 1912. (see proceedings for March, 1912)

    Publication Year: 1912 , Page(s): 1791 - 1808
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    David B. Rushmore: I want to say a few words about “some of the new things in power transmission. President Dunn mentioned the waterpower part of it — water is often spoken of as “white coal.” We are now coming to a situation of black water, that is, we are going beyond the development of waterpowers for power transmission, and one of the installations under consideration, which is just being put in, is one of the most interesting phases of the present power transmission. The Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company, the oldest of the anthracite companies in the Pennsylvania field, is just in the process of installing the first steam station in the East for purely power transmission purposes. They are going to be within easy transmission distance of both New York and Philadelphia, and ultimately will have a steam turbine plant of 120,000 kw., as their plans are at present. In future they may exceed that capacity. Their plans are to transmit power, for local distribution largely, for cement mills at first, and also, presumably, for the lighting of the towns through which they will pass, and possibly reaching into New York or Philadelphia, or both. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 1919. The current retitled publication is IEEE Spectrum.

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