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American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Proceedings of the

Issue 9 • Date Sept. 1917

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • Copyright statement

    Page(s): 1
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  • Institute meeting in Philadelphia October 8, 1917

    Page(s): 227
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  • A. I. E. E. directors' meeting August 14, 1917

    Page(s): 227 - 228
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  • Engineering Council

    Page(s): 228
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  • Membership

    Page(s): 229 - 233
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  • Personal

    Page(s): 234
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  • Accessions to the United Engineering Society library

    Page(s): 234 - 237
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  • Employment Bulletin

    Page(s): 238 - 239
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  • Officers and board of directors, 1917–1918

    Page(s): 240 - 245
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  • Modern physics

    Page(s): 695 - 712
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    My Position tonight is somewhat reminiscent of a story that my father used to be fond of telling of a Scotch preacher who thought that all of the italicised words in the Holy Writ were meant to be emphasized, and so he read: “And Abraham said unto his servants, saddle me an ass, and they saddled him.” When one of his parishioners expostulated with him and told him that he didn't think that was really what was meant, he, being a Scotchman, kept his own opinion, but being more or less politic, he said he would change it, and so the next time he read: “And Abraham said unto his servant, saddle me an ass, and they saddled him.” (Laughter.) View full abstract»

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  • Design construction and tests of an artificial power transmission line for the Telluride Power Company of Provo, Utah

    Page(s): 713 - 755
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    A description is given of an artificial power-transmission line which duplicates, in considerable detail, an actual transmission system. Each unit of the artificial line represents about ten miles of the actual line. Methods are given of calculating the correct distribution of inductance between self and mutual, and of calculating the correct distribution of capacity between wire and wire, and wire and ground. It is shown that this artificial system will duplicate very closely, even under extreme conditions of short circuits and grounds, many of the phenomena occurring on the actual system. A description is given of some oscillographic tests, made on this line, of the magnitudes and phase relations of current and voltage at different points, when the line was subjected to various types of short circuits and grounds. The data are presented in the form of vector diagrams; one for each point of the line where readings were taken. In addition to the diagrams, arrow-headed lines are shown at each station. These indicate the magnitudes and directions of power flow for each phase (as shown by star-connected wattmeters) and the total power flow. It is shown that the total power flow is not always toward the short circuit (or ground). Hence, two-wattmeter principle relays will not always indicate toward the short circuit (or ground) and may sometimes operate the wrong switch. With a three-phase short circuit the direction of power flow for each phase, and consequently the direction of total power flow, is always toward the short circuit. With a two-wire short circuit, if the phase rotation is A — B — C, and the short circuit is between wires B and C the power flow indication of the B phase wattmeter is, at all stations, toward the short circuit. The wattmeters for the other phases may indicate away from the short circuit. A ground on a single wire does not appreciably alter the power flow indication of any of the wattmeters, if the neutral is ungrounded. If - he neutral is grounded, the power flow indication for the grounded phase is toward the ground at all points. If two wires are grounded at the same time, with the neutral grounded, the power flow indications are practically the same as for the two-wire short circuit. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 1919. The current retitled publication is IEEE Spectrum.

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