By Topic

American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Proceedings of the

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1915

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 28
  • Index to volume XXXIV

    Page(s): i - x
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1101 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Index of subjects

    Page(s): i - viii
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (973 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Index of authors

    Page(s): viii - x
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (393 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Institute meeting in New York January 8, 1915

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (265 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Midwinter Convention, February 17–19, 1915

    Page(s): 1 - 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (411 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Nominations for Institute officers for 1915–16

    Page(s): 2 - 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (449 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Convention and Congress, San Francisco, September, 1915

    Page(s): 3 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (464 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The work of the standards committee and its capability fox usefulness to the Institute members

    Page(s): 4 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (690 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Directors' meeting, New York, December 11, 1914

    Page(s): 7 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (423 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Past section and branch meetings

    Page(s): 9 - 12
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (647 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Personal

    Page(s): 12 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (371 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Obituary

    Page(s): 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (256 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Membership

    Page(s): 13 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (851 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Employment department

    Page(s): 18 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (644 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Library accessions

    Page(s): 21 - 22
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (312 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Officers and Board of Directors, 1914–1915

    Page(s): 23 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (798 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The best control of public utilities

    Page(s): 1 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2398 KB)  

    The author states as an axiom that “the best control of a public utility is that which develops an eagerness and ability on the part of the company to furnish the service, and an equal eagerness and ability on the part of the consumer to purchase the service.” Five elements requisite for the development of this eagerness and ability on the part of the company and the consumers are stated and analyzed. One of the important elements is confidence in the company and its rates, and the author states his conviction that class rates are absolutely necessary for the best development of the business. All classes of consumers benefit by a diversified use of electric energy, which makes lower rates possible. The principle at the bottom of all rates is to make the plant earn all it can during every hour of the day so that the burden of the investment may be distributed. The same principle applies to nearly all public utilities, railroad, telegraph, express and postal service. There is confusion in the minds of consumers because rates for power are lower than rates for electric lighting, and the electric energy for the two very different kinds of service is measured in the same units, kilowatt-hours. But in the similar case of railway service, there is no feeling that passengers should be carried as cheaply as freight, because it is realized that the two kinds of service are very different, and one is measured in passenger-miles and the other in ton-miles. Therefore the author urges the establishment of class rates for electric service as being more scientific than the methods in general use at present, and less likely to lead to misunderstanding. Examples are given to show that the lighting consumer's rate must be much higher than the power consumer's, because the investment and cost of operation to serve the former are greater than are required to serve the latter, and because, for the same peak demand, the total energy used by the power consumers is much g- eater than that used by the lighting consumers. The paper outlines the method for determining class rates for different classes of service. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Theoretical investigation of electric transmission systems under short circuit conditions

    Page(s): 25 - 69
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3351 KB)  

    The following features of a transmission system under short-circuit conditions are discussed: 1. Mechanical forces between the phases of three-conductor, three-phase cables when carrying short-circuit current; also the forces between busbars are investigated. 2. The heating of the conductors of the cable from the instant of short circuit to a time 0.8 seconds later is traced analytically, during the transient state of the current, and typical computed heating curves are presented. 3. The effectiveness of the method of placing reactors between generator terminals and the bus from which power is taken, and additional reactors between generators and an auxiliary synchronizing bus, is analyzed. 4. This scheme is compared with the present well-recognized schemes of feeder and busbar reactors. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Discussion on “voltage testing of cables” (Middleton and Dawes), Detroit, Mich., June 25, 1914. (see proceedings for June, 1914)

    Page(s): 70 - 78
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1256 KB)  

    W. A. Del Mar: The factor of safety of an insulated wire or cable, being the ratio of the breakdown voltage to the normal operating voltage, cannot be determined experimentally without testing the insulation to destruction. It can, therefore, never be definitely known in practise, although susceptible of approximate predetermination in the absence of faults, by calculation based upon tests. If, however, we define the factor of assurance of an insulated wire or cable as the ratio of the test voltage to the normal operating voltage, we can provide an experimental basis for the comparison of voltage tests. Thus, if a cable for operation at 11,000 volts is tested at 25,000 volts, we have a factor of assurance of 2.27. If the breakdown voltage is 75,000 volts, the factor of safety is 6.82, and the ratio between the safety factor and the factor of assurance is 3.0. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Discussion on “methods of keeping down peaks on power purchased on a peak basis” (Tynes), Detroit, Mich., June 23, 1914. (see proceedings for June, 1914)

    Page(s): 79 - 84
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (953 KB)  

    Rudolph Tschentscher: Power contracts, as you all know, are usually made on a peak basis, and the question of the reduction of these peaks is a most important one. I believe it is desirable to emphasize the point Mr. Tynes has mentioned, namely, that the reduction of peaks is of material benefit to the power generating company. Paul M. Lincoln: This point that Mr. Tynes has raised is an exceedingly important one. Wherever power is taken from a hydraulic plant, the maximum demand method of charging is a logical one; no question about it. This is particularly true in the case of the hydroelectric plant where the water is not limited, such as the Niagara Falls plant. It does not matter to the power company whether the power is taken for 15 minutes, or one minute a day, or for the 24 hours continuously, it is the maximum demand which dictates the amount of the power bill, because the ability of the power company to supply power is limited by the output of the prime mover or of the generator. The fact that the power is taken continuously 24 hours a day merely means that the water is running through the wheels for that length of time, instead of running over the spillway. It is therefore perfectly logical for the power company to insist upon a system of selling on the maximum demand basis. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Discussion on “present status of prime movers” (Stott, Pigott and Gorsuch), Detroit, Mich., June 25, 1914. (see proceedings for June, 1914)

    Page(s): 85 - 102
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2291 KB)  

    R. Tschentscher: The division entitled “Gas Engines” comprises internal combustion prime movers using natural gas, producer gas, or blast furnace and coke oven gas. The relative measure in which each enters into the problem is not given. In 1907, blast furnace gas engine installations began in the iron and steel industry. It was my lot at that time to place in service and operate the first plant of any considerable size. Power from the plant referred to was imperative, and there was therefore but little time for miscellaneous experiments, alterations, readjustments, etc. The conditions presented each day were varied. Experienced men were not obtainable, the hours were long, gas headaches were frequent, and the force was ever changing. The blast furnace operating conditions required readjustment from a condition of making pig iron with gas as a by-product used for air heating or steam generation purposes, to a condition where the maintenance of an adequate gas supply was necessary in order to supply electric power for the equipment used in making the pig iron. This proposition presented an entirely different phase to the blast furnace man. If he did not make the gas, the electric power could not be supplied, and hence he could make neither pig iron nor gas. I am afraid, therefore, that in some quarters a knowledge of the earlier more or less unsatisfactory power costs and operating results incident thereto, is still the basis for an opinion as to the status of the blast furnace gas engine in power stations at the present time. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Discussion on “the sphere gap as a means of measuring high voltage” (Peek), “the electric strength of air — V, the influence of frequency” (Whitehead and Gorton), and “sphere gap discharge voltages at high frequencies” (Clark and Ryan), Detroit, Mich., June 24, 1914. (see proceedings for June, 1914)

    Page(s): 103 - 124
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2817 KB)  

    L. W. Chubb: These three papers presented under the auspices of the Electrophysics Committee are very interesting, and they add a gread deal to our knowledge of high-voltage phenomena. The paper on the sphere gap by Mr. Peek adds some valuable experimental data on the effect of barometric pressure on the gap voltages. The effect of temperature, however, as expressed in the empirical formula, seems to be a matter of assumption based on free-path and pressure, but not confirmed by experimental data. The inverse proportionality between breakdown voltage and absolute temperature may hold throughout the range of atmospheric temperatures, but the stream of negative electrons from hot metallic electrodes will possibly have a greater effect at high temperatures. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Discussion on “the effect of delta and star connections upon transformer wave forms” (Curtis), Spokane, Wash., September 10, 1914. (see proceedings for August, 1914)

    Page(s): 125 - 129
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (818 KB)  

    P. M. Lincoln: We may represent a three-phase system as in this diagram, in which the figure ABC may be assumed to rotate around its center O. The instantaneous voltages will then be proportional to the lengths of the projections upon a line, as XX. For instance, at the instant represented in the figure the instantaneous voltage of leg AO is zero, that of phase CB is a maximum, and those of phases AB and AC are each one-half of the maximum, one increasing and the other decreasing. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Discussion on “some operating conditions of the 150,000-volt transmission system of the big creek development of the pacific light & power corporation,” (Woodbury) Spokane, Wash., September 10, 1914. (see proceedings for September, 1914)

    Page(s): 130 - 133
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (697 KB)  

    J. Harisberger: There has been considerable discussion as to the necessity of synchronous condensers on this system. I would like to know what actual practise in the operation of the system has brought out; could the system be operated satisfactorily without the use of synchronous condensers? Mr. Woodbury's paper states that under conditions of short circuit the waterwheel governors shut off water before any appreciable change of speed can take place. I had the impression that the contrary would take place, that the governors would open up the gates. I would also like to know if there are any transpositions in either of the transmission lines? View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Discussion on “electrification of the Butte, Anaconda and Pacific railway” (Cox), Spokane, Wash., September 10, 1914. (see proceedings for November, 1914)

    Page(s): 134 - 143
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1403 KB)  

    Paul Lebenbaum: This paper looms up as an oasis of facts in a desert of glittering generalities, and records a distinct step forward and upward in heavy railway electrification. It is unique in that it sets forth, not only facts, but actual figures on operating results, for a road that made the change from steam to electricity solely in order to obtain increased capacity and greater economy in operation. Most, if not all, of the heavy electrification has been done for the purpose of overcoming an operating condition for which steam was unsuited, such as the New York terminal electrifications, the work of the Great Northern at the Cascade Tunnel, etc. It must therefore be peculiarly gratifying to the management and its engineers that the economies resulting from the change were so quickly and positively established. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

This Magazine ceased publication in 1919. The current retitled publication is IEEE Spectrum.

Full Aims & Scope