Scheduled System Maintenance:
Some services will be unavailable Sunday, March 29th through Monday, March 30th. We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Antennas and Propagation Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date June 2013

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 92
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2176 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2978 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 3 - 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1746 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Copyright

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1501 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Information for contributors

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 6
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1967 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Magazine staff

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 7 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1588 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • AP-S Officers and Administrative Committee

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1781 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Feature articles and contributions solicited

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1781 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • President's Message

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 12 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1001 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Call for papers

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 14 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (3503 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • High-Frequency Techniques in Diffraction Theory: 50 Years of Achievements in GTD, PTD, and Related Approaches [Special section introduction]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 16 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (3856 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The 50-Year Anniversary Of the PTD: Comments on the PTD's Origin and Development

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 18 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2978 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper contains brief comments on the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD). It describes its origination, development, and gives examples of engineering applications. The paper highlights basic features of the PTD, and discusses its prospects. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • GTD, UTD, UAT, and STD: A Historical Revisit and Personal Observations

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 29 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3436 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In his landmark paper, dated February 1962, Prof. Joseph Keller detailed the notion of Keller's cone. He stated, “Geometrical optics, the oldest and most widely used theory of light propagation, fails to account for certain optical phenomena called diffraction....” I had a personal encounter with Keller's cone at a hotel in Florida! In the early morning on October 14, 2007, I witnessed Keller's cone on the door of my hotel room, resulting from edge diffraction from a TV stand due to the sun's rays coming through an opening of a window curtain. By now we know how to construct the local plane-wave behavior of the diffracted field along the diffracted rays, by invoking the fact that an edge forms one of the caustics of the diffracted wavefront. We also know that the diffracted field is of the order of k-1/2, in comparison to the geometrical-optics field, which is of the order of k0. In many antenna and scattering problems, this added diffracted term immensely enhances the accuracy of the total field. Due to the boundary-layer properties of the diffracted ray field along the incident and reflected shadow boundaries and also caustics, the original form of Keller's construction fails. These shadow-boundary shortcomings have been overcome through construction of the Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD, by Kouyoumjian and Pathak), the Uniform Asymptotic Theory (UAT, by Ahluwalia, Boersma, Lewis, Lee, and Deschamps), and the Spectral Theory of Diffraction (STD, by Rahmat-Samii, Ko, and Mittra). An overview and the salient features of these theories are revisited in a novel and unified manner, and a representative reflector-antenna example is highlighted. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Wedge-Type Problem: The Building Brick in High-Frequency Scattering from Complex Objects

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 41 - 58
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4479 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the problem of high-frequency scattering in a ray-tracing context. It focuses on the wedge problem as the most relevant contribution to the diffracted field from complex objects. The wedge problem's solution is then treated either analytically or numerically. It is treated analytically by resorting to the Malyuzhinets spectral technique and a subsequent approximate solution. It is treated numerically by deriving a parabolic equation from the original elliptic problem, which can then be easily and efficiently solved numerically via finite differences. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Correction

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 59 - 60
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (175 KB)  

    The authors have provided some additions to, and corrections of a few minor typographical errors for, the article by S. Arslanagic, T. V. Hansen, N. A. Mortensen, A. H. Gregersen, O. Sigmund, R. W. Ziolkowski, and O. Breinbjerg, "A Review of the Scattering Parameter Extraction Method with Clarification of Ambiguity Issues in Relation to Metamaterial Homogenization," IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine, 55,2, April 2013, pp. 91-106. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Correction

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 60
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (100 KB)  

    The name of one of the authors of the contribution, "Wave-Interference Explanation of Group-Delay Dispersion in Resonators," to the Education Column was misspelled in the Table of Contents of the April issue of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine (55, 2, April 2013, p. 4). The correct spelling of the last author's name is Christophe Caloz. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Getting the Magazine by Air Freight

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 60
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1510 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Evolution of Maxwell's Equations from 1862 to the Present Day

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 61 - 81
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1784 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Maxwell's equations have undergone several changes of form in the 150 years since they first emerged. This has been due not only to changes in their mathematical expression and physical interpretation, but also to historical accidents and trends. This article examines: what they were in the beginning; how they evolved into their customary form over the course of 40 years; the significant variations there have been since then; who have been the major proponents of these changes; and finally, what they did, or did not, contribute. Brief explanations of the main mathematical variations are included. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Changes of Address or Delivery Problems

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 81
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1453 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Analysis of Information and Power Transfer in Wireless Communications

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 82 - 95
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3164 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An analysis of wireless information compared to power transfer over the same channel, consisting of a transmitting and receiving antenna system, is discussed. This frequency-selective additive-white-Gaussian-noise channel displays a fundamental tradeoff between the rate at which energy and the rate at which reliable information can be transmitted over the same channel, as in an RFID system, a power-line communication system, or for an energy-harvesting system. The optimal tradeoffs between power transferred and the channel capacity due to Shannon (which is additive-white-Gaussian-noise limited), Gabor (which is interference limited), and Tuller (which is defined in terms of the signal and noise amplitudes, and not power) are compared, and the differences are discussed. The appropriate use of each of the channel-capacity formulations for a frequency-selective transmitting/receiving antenna system in wireless communication is then computed as an illustrative example, to describe the tradeoff between wireless power transfer and wireless information transfer over a transmitting/receiving antenna system. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Transmission-Line Model for Wave Excitation of a Porous Conducting Sphere

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 96 - 117
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (7685 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A wire mesh conformed to a spherical surface forms a spherical polyhedron that has unique resonator and scattering properties for electromagnetic (EM) waves. Excitation of the spherical polyhedron by an incident plane wave at specified resonant frequencies yields large internal electric fields. Narrowband enhancements in the backscatter radar cross section are found at these same frequencies. These effects are explained with a model where the mesh is treated as an inductive frequency-selective surface that is used to match a shorted-line resonator attached to a transmission line. With this transmission-line model, the impedance of the inductive surface is shown to be an addition to the expression for the spherical harmonic series used to describe solid conducting spheres and spherical cavities. The resonant modes for the internal and external electric fields of the porous sphere are found with this formulation. The surface mesh is used in the low-frequency limit, where the EM wavelength is much larger than the polygon's holes in the mesh. The impedance (inductance and resistance) of the mesh are adjusted by varying the radii of the edges of the polygons and the conductivity of the edge material. Applications of the spherical porous conducting resonator (SPCR) include glow plasma discharges, measurements of dielectric constants of gases, and frequency-selective radar targets. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Feasibility of Communication Among Pumps in a District Heating System

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 118 - 134
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2532 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The problem tackled is selecting a viable method for communication among pumps in a district heating system. This system is viewed as a metropolitan wireless sensor network, the nodes of which are confined underground and physically connected by pipes. In a further horizon, providing sophisticated control systems for similar urban utilities motivates this research problem. Here we have reported the results of investigating several potential methods for realizing the idea of “the talking pumps” in a district heating system. This includes a diverse list of key references, simulations for some methods and experimental results for some others, followed by selection of the most appropriate option. The methods considered used (1) acoustic waves through water and pipelines; (2) power-line communications; (3) the electrical conductivity of pipes; (4) cell-phone infrastructure; (5) free and guided radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) waves; and (5) free and guided very low frequency (VLF) electric and magnetic fields, also known as magnetic induction. The viability of the latter method was verified by simulations and primitive experimental results. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • To All IEEE Life Members

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 134
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1444 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 135
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (282 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Chapter News

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 136 - 139
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (490 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine covers all areas relating to antenna theory, design, and practice.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Mahta Moghaddam