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Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date Feb. 1994

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Toward the service-rich era /spl lsqb/optical access networks/spl rsqb/

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 34 - 39
    Cited by:  Papers (12)  |  Patents (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1246 KB)  

    In order to remain viable the common carriers to develop "optical access network" based on FTTH as soon as possible. Many problems must be overcome in moving from the "metallic" world to the "optical" world, but if carriers hesitate and fail to make this move then they will be in a hopeless situation in the 21st century. This article discusses concepts for realizing optical access networks that are competitive with other media systems and for introducing them to the telephone world, to provide various attractive services to their customers and so gain their continued support.<> View full abstract»

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  • Field trials for fiber access in the EC

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 40 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1109 KB)  

    The European Economic Community's (EC) RACE program (Research and Development in Advanced Communications Technologies in Europe) started with a definition phase in 1986. The main effort of the first phase was aimed at customer access connections (CACs) and customer premises networks (CPNs), as well as identification of services that will use these high-speed networks. In the second phase, which began in 1992, RACE projects are focused on managing the high data rates generated by these networks and the need for high-capacity transport networks. The greater functionality required and the large number of multiuser applications operating simultaneously within and between organizations generates data rates, both intra- and intersite, on the order of tens of Gb/s. Such high data rates will spur the market for gigabit networks. At the start of the RACE program, some projects were devoted to integrating interactive and distributive services into one ATM-based electrical user network interface. The main motivation was the use of the same fiber for different services to the subscriber. The RACE projects demonstrate fiber-based broadband infrastructures for local access.<> View full abstract»

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  • The evolution of the access network in Germany

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 50 - 55
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (815 KB)  

    The unification of eastern and western Germany confronted Deutsche Telekom (DT) virtually overnight with what is probably the greatest challenge in the history of telecommunications in Germany: to bring the telecommunications networks in eastern Germany out of the technological stone age and up to the standard of a western industrialized country with state-of-the-art technology and services as quickly as possible. DT must optimize the integration of the various generations of technical systems into all areas of the telecommunications network and develop strategies for launching products and services to rapidly achieve advantages in productivity. Because of the interaction of growing process and product innovation and the resulting synergy, this will rapidly improve the performance of the network and lead to reduced costs in years to come. This article gives an overview of the general conditions under which DT is implementing fiber-in-the-loop (FITL) and describes the technology used. It also presents DT's complementary strategy for the use of SDH technology in the access area.<> View full abstract»

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  • The fiber-optic subscriber network in Japan

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 56 - 63
    Cited by:  Papers (1)  |  Patents (10)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (981 KB)  

    Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) has two primary aims regarding the installation of optical fiber cables for subscriber networks as the access network: to provide high-speed broadband services, and to provide narrowband services through optical fiber cables with subscriber-line multiplex technology. Thus, NTT is preparing an infrastructure to support the forthcoming B-ISDN subscriber networks. NTT has been developing technologies for implementing the full-scale construction of fiber-optic subscriber networks. The present article describes the deployment methodology for these networks, their current status, and plans for their future development.<> View full abstract»

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  • Technologies for local-access fibering

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 64 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (10)  |  Patents (19)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1081 KB)  

    The authors describe passive optical networks (PON), optical wavelength allocation, device and system technologies. Some examples of PON systems are given including SDM, WDM, FDM, and TCM. The authors go on to discuss optical modules LSI and optical amplifiers. The paper concludes with a discussion of upgrading PONs.<> View full abstract»

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  • Operating and powering optical fiber network

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 74 - 77
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (501 KB)  

    Fiber-in-the-loop (FITL) systems enable the distribution transport of existing telecommunications services and future broadband services over fiber optic media. An FITL system comprises a host digital terminal (HDT) connected to some number of optical network units (ONUs) via a fiber optic passive distribution network (PDN). Each ONU provides metallic service interfaces via short drops consisting of metallic wire pairs or coaxial cable. FITL systems that carry plain old telephony services (POTS) are referred to as "POTS FITL" systems. FITL systems that deliver VDT services or combined VDT and telephony services are referred to as "VDT FITL" systems. There are a number of architectural alternatives for VDT FITL, including configurations involving the use of parallel technologies for transporting video signals in the distribution. The authors discuss network operations and powering in particular.<> View full abstract»

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  • Omissions and ambiguities in CCITT Recommendation Q.921

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 88 - 94
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (985 KB)  

    The data link layer protocol for the integrated services digital network (ISDN) user/network interface, known as link access protocol-D (LAPD), is a protocol that operates at layer 2 of the open systems interconnection (OSI) architecture. Its purpose is to safely convey information between layer 3 entities using the D-channel. The information types that LAPD is intended to transport include call control signaling, packet mode communications, and management information. Observations are made in this article about what are, in the authors' opinion, the most confusing points of CCITT Recommendation Q.921 with comments related to data link layer address field, broadcast connections, terminal endpoint identifier (TEI) management procedures, layer 2 frames exchange, and connection management entity response to MDL-error indication primitives. This article intends solely to clarify the recommendations so that their concepts and procedures become easier to understand and implement, which can lead to significant saving of time for those who must eventually use LAPD procedures or develop the software for handling them.<> View full abstract»

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  • Customer premises networks of the future

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 96 - 98
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (416 KB)  

    B-ISDN based on ATM technologies is expected to offer enhanced and sophisticated services to users, but selecting a graceful migration path is critical. During the introductory stage of the ATM-customer premises network (CPN)/spl minus/as an initial broadband public network service/spl minus/ATM leased-line service will use VP crossconnect network. An efficient CPN interconnection via end-to-end VP pipe therefore would be an attractive application. The possible migration scenario of ATM-CPN is presented, the required functions and services in future CPN are clarified for each evolutional stage, i.e., the introductory, expansion and diffusion stages, and the importance of medium-bit-rate SB interfaces is described. It is also shown that a 10 to 20 Mb/s metallic interface should be introduced as a cost-effective SB interface.<> View full abstract»

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  • Optical fiber access-perspectives toward the 21st century

    Publication Year: 1994 , Page(s): 78 - 86
    Cited by:  Papers (10)  |  Patents (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1036 KB)  

    The vision of an all-fiber telecommunications network delivering an ever increasing variety of services to both business and residential customers has been the subject of much speculation for more than a decade. However, although optical fibers are now used routinely for longer haul transmission and for connections to large business customers; fiber to provide the final link to the generality of customers has proved to be a tougher challenge than originally expected. The extent to which fiber will penetrate the network depends not only on technical capabilities and economic performance, but also on regulation, competition, and the types of service that customers will actually want. The interplay between these complex factors is discussed, and potential scenarios are described. An endpoint vision of a future broadband infrastructure is described in order to illustrate the major new service delivery and operational benefits, which can flow from the revolutionary new technologies that can now be unleashed View full abstract»

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IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

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Huawei Technologies