Scheduled System Maintenance:
On May 6th, system maintenance will take place from 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM ET (12:00 - 16:00 UTC). During this time, there may be intermittent impact on performance. We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Human-Machine Systems, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date July 2013

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (67 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems publication information

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (136 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • An Experimental Space for Conducting Controlled Driving Behavior Studies based on a Multiuser Networked 3D Virtual Environment and the Scenario Markup Language

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 345 - 358
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1369 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a new framework for conducting controlled driving behavior studies based on multiuser networked 3-D virtual environments. The framework supports: 1) the simulation of multiuser immersive driving; 2) the visualization of surrounding traffic; 3) the specification and creation of reproducible traffic scenarios; and 4) the collection of meaningful driving behavior data. We use our framework to investigate the “rubbernecking” phenomenon, which refers to the slowing down of a driver due to an accident on the opposite side of the road, and its effect on the following drivers. The main contribution of the paper is the Scenario Markup Language (SML) framework, which is composed of: 1) the SML as a practical tool to specify dynamic traffic situations (e.g., an accident) and 2) the Scenario Control System to ensure the reproducibility of particular traffic situations, so that traffic engineers can obtain comparable data and draw valid conclusions. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our framework, we specified the traffic accident scenario in SML and conducted a study about the rubbernecking phenomenon. We report on the results of our study from two viewpoints: 1) the reproducibility of the traffic accident situation (i.e., state variables of interest are recreated successfully in 78% of the cases); and 2) the interactive car-following behavior of human subjects embedded in the traffic situation of the virtual environment. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Discovering Contexts from Observed Human Performance

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 359 - 370
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (851 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes an investigation to determine the technical feasibility of discovering and identifying the various contexts experienced by a human performer (called an actor ) solely from a trace of time-stamped values of variables. More specifically, the goal of this research was to discover the contexts that a human actor experienced, while performing a tactical task in a simulated environment, the sequence of these contexts and their temporal duration. We refer to this process as the contextualization of the performance trace. In the process of doing this, we devised a context discovery algorithm called context partitioning and clustering (COPAC). The relevant variables that were observed in the trace were selected a priori by a human. The output of the COPAC algorithm was qualitatively compared with manual (human) contextualization of the same traces. One possible use of such automated context discovery is to help build autonomous tactical agents capable of performing the same tasks as the human actor. As such, we also quantitatively compared the results of using the COPAC-derived contexts with those obtained with human-derived contextualization in building autonomous tactical agents. Test results are described and discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Modeling Human Guidance Behavior Based on Patterns in Agent–Environment Interactions

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 371 - 384
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1136 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the foundations for the analysis and modeling of human guidance behavior that is based on the emergent patterns in the closed-loop agent-environment dynamics. The central hypothesis is that these patterns, which can be explained in terms of invariants inherent to the closed-loop dynamics, provide the building blocks for the organization of human guidance behavior. The concept of interaction patterns is first introduced using a toy example and then detailed formally using dynamical system and control principles. This paper then demonstrates the existence and significance of interaction patterns in human guidance behavior that is based on data collected using guidance experiments with a miniature helicopter. The results confirm that human guidance behavior indeed exhibits invariances as defined by interaction patterns. The trajectories that are associated with each interaction pattern are then further decomposed by applying piecewise linear identification. The resulting elements are then combined under a hierarchical model that provides a natural and formal description of human guidance behavior. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Design and Evaluation of a Haptic Computer-Assistant for Telemanipulation Tasks

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 385 - 397
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1564 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper introduces a computer-assisted teleoperation system, where the control over the teleoperator is shared between a human operator and computer assistance in order to improve the overall task performance. Two units, an action recognition and an assistance unit are introduced to provide context-specific assistance. The action recognition unit can evaluate haptic data, handle high sampling rates, and deal with human behavior changes caused by the actived haptic assistance. Repairing of a broken hard drive is selected as scenario and three different task-specific assistance functions are designed. The overall computer-assisted teleoperation system is evaluated in two steps: first, the performance of the action recognition unit is evaluated and then, the performance of the integrated computer-assisted teleoperation system is compared with an unassisted system by means of a user study with 15 participants. Overall action recognition rates of about 65% are achieved. Multivariate paired comparisons show that the computer-assisted teleoperation system significantly reduces the human effort and damage possibility compared with a teleoperation system without assistance. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Measurement of Angular Motion in Golf Swing by a Local Sensor at the Grip End of a Golf Club

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 398 - 404
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1296 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes a novel method for measuring golf swing angular motion in a global coordinate system using the 3-D acceleration and angular velocity detected by a local motion sensor set at the grip end of a golf club. Optical direct linear transformation (DLT) is the conventional method for measuring sports motion; however, accurate localization of global coordinates and precise setting of infrared high-speed cameras in the test field are essential. Furthermore, infrared reflectors must be attached to the moving object. The system itself and the fine-tuning are expensive, but an accurately set system can provide precise positions for the moving reflectors. It is effective for measuring translational motion but not angular motion that is based on the principles of measurement. The alternative method that is proposed here is easier in terms of setting and fine-tuning, more reasonable in cost, and more accurate in measuring rotational motion compared with the DLT method. Furthermore, the system's wireless transmitter enables noninvasive measurement. When addressing the golf club, its initial angles and posture matrix are calculated using the 3-D acceleration; when the swing begins, the motion sensor measures the changing angular velocity and the acceleration. The application of step-by-step Euler transformation for each sampling interval yields the angular velocity and angle in the global coordinate system. The mean RMSE of ten trials with five subjects was 3.06°, 26.64°, and 4.43° for the 3-D angle of the club shaft. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Evaluation of Sternocleidomastoid Muscle Activity of a Passenger in Response to a Car's Lateral Acceleration While Slalom Driving

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 405 - 415
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1051 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Human factors are becoming one of the most important factors that are considered for automobile design and test. However, the ride comfort of a passenger or driver is mainly dependent on a subjective assessment by a test driver or questionnaire investigation, and, therefore, a quantitative evaluation of the ride comfort is being pursued as one of the research goals in the automobile industry. In this paper, actual-vehicle and driving simulator (DS) experiments were carried out to evaluate the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle activity of a passenger in response to a car's lateral acceleration while slalom driving. Interestingly, the SCM muscle of the passenger on the side opposite the direction of the car's lateral acceleration contracts to keep the head stable against the body shaking. The electromyography (EMG) signal of the SCM muscle in a modified car was significantly lower than in a normal car, because the 1-10 Hz low-frequency vibrations of the body frame of the modified car during the slalom driving were decreased through improvements of the rigidity of car's body frame. A passenger feels more discomfort when the EMG signal of the SCM muscle increases, and less as the signal decreases. The DS experiment, with the addition of more experimental conditions, arrived at the same conclusion, which testified that the DS is a powerful tool with which to evaluate passenger discomfort. In conclusion, the EMG of the SCM muscle can be considered as an objective and effective method with which to quantify the effect of vehicle properties on human discomfort in both actual-vehicle and DS experiments for slalom driving. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Reliably Creating Collision Avoidance Advisories in Piloted Simulations

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 416 - 420
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (344 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We demonstrate a novel method to reliably generate collision avoidance advisories, in piloted simulations, by the widely used traffic alert and collision avoidance system (TCAS). The TCAS advisory issued to a pilot is highly sensitive to the trajectory of an intruder aircraft relative to the ownship flown by the pilot. In realistic piloted simulations, a prescripted intruder trajectory will not reliably result in the relative dynamics that lead to a desired TCAS advisory. Further, the complexity of the TCAS logic requires a novel method for mapping trajectories to the range of possible advisories. We propose to use a rapidly exploring random tree algorithm in large-scale fast-time simulations to establish the mapping between the space of relative trajectories and TCAS advisories. These trajectories are then created in piloted simulations through guidance algorithms. Results demonstrate the ease of use and robustness of this method, and its potential for pilot training and for research and development. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society Information

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (98 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems information for authors

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (108 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems covers human systems and human organizational interactions including cognitive ergonomics, system test and evaluation, and human information processing concerns in systems and organizations.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief 
Ellen Bass 
Drexel University
College of Computing & Informatics
College of Nursing and Health Professions
3141 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia PA 19104 USA 
THMS-EIC@ieee.org