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A.I.E.E., Journal of the

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1930

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 64
  • [Title page]

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 1
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  • Meetings of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 1
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  • A message from the President

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 1
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  • Some leaders of the A. I. E. E.

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 2
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  • Operating transformers by temperature

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 3 - 6
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    This paper discusses a proposal, sponsored by the Transformer Subcommittee of the Committee on Electrical Machinery, which is intended to serve as a guide in operating transformers by temperature rather than in accordance with their nameplate ratings. There is a real difference between “rating standards” and “recommendations for operation;” one simply specifies the measure of a machine under a definite set of conditions and the other constitutes a guide for loading under the varying conditions of actual service. With this difference in mind, a departure from the practise of the Institute up to this time is suggested; namely, that these operating recommendations be placed in an appendix of the Standards and considered not as rating standards but purely as a guide in loading transformers which have been designed to meet the Standards of Rating. One of the first things that had to be done in framing these recommendations was to setae the maximum safe limiting temperature of the windings for operation in actual service. The aim in making this selection was to provide for reasonable deterioration of the insulation and therefore a reasonably long life for the transformer. For reasons disclosed in this paper, a limiting temperature of 95 deg. cent. was adopted. This limit is 10 deg. below that used in the Standards for Rating. These are the high points of the proposal. But opinion on these matters seems to be rather divided throughout the industry, and the purpose of this paper is to bring them to the attention of all members of the Institute. View full abstract»

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  • Quiet induction motors

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 7 - 11
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    Magnetic noise in induction motors is caused by the vibration of magnetic parts produced by the varying forces associated with the changing flux density in the adjacent air parts of the magnetic circuit. Torsional vibration of the motor is caused by unbalanced windings or applied voltages. Vibration of the rotor simulating a mechanically unbalanced rotor is caused by two fields differing by two poles and not of the same frequency or direction of rotation. Vibration of the stator by distortion from a circular shape results from the presence of other simple combinations of fields. Teeth tend to vibrate axially at double applied frequency. The magnetic noise produced by a motor can be predicted from a qualitative analysis of the air-gap field supplemented by an approximate quantitative analysis and consideration of the stiffness of the parts. View full abstract»

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  • Abridgment of the Chicago long distance toll board

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 11 - 15
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    The long distance telephone office serves to provide a concentration point for intercity telephone communication from a group of local exchanges, and its size mil depend largely upon the number of stations served by the local offices. The Chicago toll office, which serves 1,200,000 stations, recently has been replaced largely with new equipment. This equipment, together with correlated improvements in handling toll service at Chicago, is described in this paper. The work of the toll operator in handling toll calls with the new equipment is compared with the former method. It is this change in operating practise which constitutes a major improvement in long distance service. The paper also includes d description of the toll lines entering Chicago, with their equipment arrangements including telephone repeaters, the power plants required to operate this equipment and that associated with the switchboards. The addendum describes the purpose of the auxiliary and special switchboards which are required in large installations only, such as those in Chicago. View full abstract»

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  • Abridgment of the general circle diagram of electrical machinery

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 16 - 18
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    The well-known circle diagram of a transmission network is applied to electrical machinery, giving circle diagrams of alternators, synchronous motors, synchronous condensers, and transformers. These diagrams give a graphical representation of the machine performance under all possible conditions. Such quantities as power loss, lower input, power output, field current., etc., for any operating condition, can be obtained by inspection. These diagrams have the same field of usefulness as the circle diagram of the inductionmotor. The transmission network circle diagram can be applied to the induction motor, yielding in the approximate representation the Heyland diagram, which is merely a special case of the more general diagram. The transmission network method of attack gives a straight-forward solution to many induction motor problems that would otherwise be difficult to handle; such as a motor equipped with a phase advancer. View full abstract»

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  • Abridgment of magnetic circuit units

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 18 - 21
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    A proposition to introduce a change in the units of the magnetic circuit was made at the meeting of the International Electrotechnical Commission, (I. E. C.) in Bellagio, September 1927. The proposition was referred to an international subcommittee for consideration and report, by the Advisory I. E. C. Committee on Nomenclature. The subcommittee has recently reported, recommending that the matter be placed on the agenda of the next I. E. C. meeting, and that in the meanwhile, the subject should be discussed in all the national committees, more especially in the various electrical engineering societies, so as to pave the way for well considered international action. This paper has been prepared in the hope of presenting the questions definitely, with a view to eliciting discussion and opinions that may be helpful from the international point of view. As an aid to the formulation of views on the subject among those who may not have given special attention to the historical development of the magnetic-circuit units, a short outline of their history is here submitted. View full abstract»

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  • Abridgment of dissipation of heat by radiation

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 22 - 24
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    Heat dissipation is an ever-present factor affecting the design and operation of many kinds of electrical equipment. Usually, the problem is to get rid of heat due to losses. Sometimes the problem is how to conserve heat. Radiation, or convection, or conduction, or combinations of these, enter into all cases. Engineering literature as a rule presents conduction and convection in sound terms but in many cases, the treatment of radiation is unsound, misleading, and sometimes in error. This paper is presented with the hope of putting heat radiation in engineering applications on a sounder basis. The usual laws given to cover total heat radiation are slated and discussed, and their limitations brought out. Net heat loss by radiation interchange for the cases of parallel and concentric surfaces are reviewed and stated. The problem of total radiation from a rectangular slot is attacked, the method of solution is indicated by example and discussion, and the results given. View full abstract»

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  • Abridgment of effects of electric shock

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 25 - 29
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    This paper describes an investigation of the effects of electric shock on the central nervous system. A total of 286 rats was employed in the investigation. These were shocked at 110, 220, 500, and 1000 volts on both alternating- and continuous-current circuits for varying lengths of time. In each series the duration of the shock was increased until it was found impossible to resuscitate the rats. When possible, the rats were resuscitated by means of artificial respiration and kept alive for about a week. Then they were killed by an overdose of ether and an autopsy was immediately made. The rats reacted in entirely different manner on the two types of circuit; at the lower voltages the alternating current was deadlier than the continuous, but at the high voltage, the opposite was found to be the case. In many instances the rats were paralyzed by the application of the current and at autopsy in the majority of these animals gross hemorrhages were found in the spinal cord. All of the deaths that occurred as a result of the shock were caused by respiratory failure, which usually could be traced to an injury of the central nervous system. In some cases the electric current produced peculiar effects upon the rats. View full abstract»

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  • Abridgment of polyphase induction motors: A labor saving method of calculating performance from previously determined constants

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 29 - 33
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    This paper presents a method of calculating polyphase induction motor performance which eliminates a large amount of detail work without making use of approximations which sacrifice accuracy. In any rigorous system for calculating induction motor performance, the determination of the relation between input and current values makes the greater part of the work. By the procedure here presented, the relation of watts to amperes for all cases likely to be encountered in ordinary design work may be accurately calculated once for all and recorded in a set of curves. When making practical calculations tedious detail work may be eliminated by taking the necessary values from the curves, in much the same way that sines are taken from sine tables. The calculation begins with the torque, from which the corresponding secondary input is obtained by a simple formula. Then, by reference to the appropriate curves and a few simple slide rule operations, the primary and secondary currents are determined. With the secondary input and the current values known, the completion of the calculation requires nothing more than a few operations of simple arithmetic. The entire process for one load point may be completed in from five to seven minutes. View full abstract»

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  • Candles vs. incandescent lamps

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 33
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  • Abridgment of theory of a new valve type lightning arrester

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 34 - 37
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    Theory and experimental data are given on the properties of discharges confined to small holes, such as the pores of a naturally porous material. The characteristics of these discharges are such that they are well suited for utilization in a valve type lightning arrester. View full abstract»

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  • Abridgment of three-phase short-circuit synchronous machines — V

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 38 - 41
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    This paper is the fifth of a series which the authors' have presented on the subject of synchronous machines. Part I was an extension of the fundamental theory: Part II, a treatment of torque-angle characteristics under steady-stale conditions; Part III, a study of torque-angle characteristics under transient conditions; and Part IV, an analysis of single-phase short-circuits. In the present paper equations for the currents in the armature phases and field under three-phase short-circuit are developed. The analysis is divided into three parts: The first covers the case of short-circuit at no-load when the resistance is negligible in determining the magnitude of the current although it must naturally be considered in finding the decrement factors: the second considers the same case where the resistance does effect the magnitude of the current; the third covers the case of short-circuit under load when resistance is negligible as in the first case. The effect of the nature of the load, — i. e., whether the power factor is lagging or leading, — is studied and some interesting results are brought out. It is shown that short circuits under load may give less current than at no-load; and it is further developed that under certain practical operating conditions, it is even possible to obtain substantially no fundamental current. The paper is illustrated with comparisons of calculated curves and oscillograms showing the actual currents obtained in test. Some of the interesting points concerning the nature of the short-circuit currents and the manner in which they are influenced by the design of the machine are mentioned in the discussion of results. View full abstract»

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  • Shaded lighting

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 41
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    Too much cannot be said in favor of shaded lighting. Comparing shaded light with the bare lamp glare there is everything in favor of the shaded fixture. Soft light is always desirable. Its possibilities for decoration and its soothing effect on its surrounding contrast sharply against the undressed balls of flame which blind the eye and fray the nerves. View full abstract»

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  • Abridgment of tap changing under load for voltage and phase-angle control

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 42 - 46
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    One of the most important and sometimes most involved, problems brought about by the many interconnections of electrical systems, is a means of accurate and flexible regulation of power flow. The adjustment of voltage and the control of wattless current by means of tap-changing-under-load equipment has become quite extensive. The regulation of power flow by means of phase-angle control has been put into practise on a limited scale. One means of accomplishing this which has been used in a few cases and which is being considered on a larger scale is the adaptation of tap-changing-under-load equipment with properly connected static transformers. The purpose of this paper is to discuss briefly the connections employed and the equipment used in connection with static transformers for the purpose of voltage and phase-angle control. View full abstract»

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  • Abridgment of ionization currents and the breakdown of insulation

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 46 - 50
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    Certain theories of the breakdown of gases are reviewed. Their limitations or correctness in the light of recent data on the breakdown of large gaps with surge voltages are considered. The work of various investigators on the time lag of breakdown also is discussed briefly. It is shown that comparisons are made difficult and that large discrepancies, particularly at the shorter time lags, may result from variations in the definitions of time lag and breakdown time. The existence of ionization or streamer currents of high magnitude previous to the final breakdown is established and a number of volt — time and ampere — time oscillograms of flashovers on various types of insultation with the effect of these streamer currents in attenuating a traveling chopped wave are shown and discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Abridgment of air transport communication

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 50 - 54
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    The successful operation of an air transportation system depends in no small degree on the communication facilities at its command. Rapid and dependable communication between transport planes in flight and the ground is essential. Two-way radio telephony provides this necessary plane-to-ground contact. The design of a radio telephone system for this service requires quantitative knowledge of the transmission conditions encountered in plane-to-ground communication. An experimental investigation of these conditions over the available frequency range has been carried out and the results are described. A complete aircraft radio telephone system designed for the use of air transport lines and an airplane radio receiver designed for reception of government radio aids to air navigation are also described. View full abstract»

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  • Fiftieth anniversary of Michigan engineering society

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 54
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  • The 1930 Winter convention: Timely technical papers, trips and entertainment are on this excellent program

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 55 - 57
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  • A.I.E.E. nominations

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 57 - 58
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  • Biographical sketches of candidates

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 58 - 60
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  • International Congress in Liege

    Publication Year: 1930 , Page(s): 60
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Aims & Scope

The Journal of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE) contains articles published between 1924 and 1930. Contents are devoted to the advancement of theory and practice of electrical engineering and the allied arts and sciences.

This Journal ceased publication in 1930. The current retitled publication is IEEE Spectrum.

Full Aims & Scope