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Network and Service Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 2013

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • SVNE: Survivable Virtual Network Embedding Algorithms for Network Virtualization

    Page(s): 105 - 118
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (403 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Network virtualization can offer more flexibility and better manageability for the future Internet by allowing multiple heterogeneous virtual networks (VN) to coexist on a shared infrastructure provider (InP) network. A major challenge in this respect is the VN embedding problem that deals with the efficient mapping of virtual resources on InP network resources. Previous research focused on heuristic algorithms for the VN embedding problem assuming that the InP network remains operational at all times. In this paper, we remove this assumption by formulating the survivable virtual network embedding (SVNE) problem. We then develop a pro-active, and a hybrid policy heuristic to solve it, and a baseline policy heuristic to compare to. The hybrid policy is based on a fast re-routing strategy and utilizes a pre-reserved quota for backup on each physical link. Our evaluation results show that our proposed heuristics for SVNE outperform the baseline heuristic in terms of long term business profit for the InP, acceptance ratio, bandwidth efficiency, and response time. View full abstract»

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  • Pricing Utility-Based Virtual Networks

    Page(s): 119 - 132
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (658 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a new pricing mechanism for virtual network (VN) services to regulate the demand for their shared substrate network (SN) resources. The contributions of this article are two-fold; first, we introduce a new time-of-use pricing policy for the SN resources that reflects the effect of resource congestion introduced by VN users. The preferences of the VN users are first represented through corresponding demand-utility functions that quantify the sensitivity of the applications hosted by the VNs to resource consumption, time-of-use and prices during peak-demand periods. We then introduce a novel model of time-varying VNs, where users are allowed to up- or down-scale the requested resources to continuously maximize their utility while minimizing the cost of embedding the VNs onto the SN. The second contribution is a novel hierarchical embedding management approach tailored to efficiently map these dynamic VNs. The proposed VN embedding scheme recasts the VN embedding problem as a subgraph matching one, and introduces a simple heuristics-based matching procedure to find a good VN embedding from a number of candidate solutions obtained in parallel. In contrast to existing solutions, the proposed scheme does not impose any limitations on the size or topology of the VN requests. Instead, the search is customized according to the VN size and the associated utility. Experimental results demonstrate the performance achieved by the proposed work in terms of the increased profit, resource utilization and number of accepted requests. View full abstract»

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  • An Effective Network Traffic Classification Method with Unknown Flow Detection

    Page(s): 133 - 147
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (453 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Traffic classification technique is an essential tool for network and system security in the complex environments such as cloud computing based environment. The state-of-the-art traffic classification methods aim to take the advantages of flow statistical features and machine learning techniques, however the classification performance is severely affected by limited supervised information and unknown applications. To achieve effective network traffic classification, we propose a new method to tackle the problem of unknown applications in the crucial situation of a small supervised training set. The proposed method possesses the superior capability of detecting unknown flows generated by unknown applications and utilizing the correlation information among real-world network traffic to boost the classification performance. A theoretical analysis is provided to confirm performance benefit of the proposed method. Moreover, the comprehensive performance evaluation conducted on two real-world network traffic datasets shows that the proposed scheme outperforms the existing methods in the critical network environment. View full abstract»

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  • Using Fuzzy Logic Control to Provide Intelligent Traffic Management Service for High-Speed Networks

    Page(s): 148 - 161
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1090 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In view of the fast-growing Internet traffic, this paper propose a distributed traffic management framework, in which routers are deployed with intelligent data rate controllers to tackle the traffic mass. Unlike other explicit traffic control protocols that have to estimate network parameters (e.g., link latency, bottleneck bandwidth, packet loss rate, or the number of flows) in order to compute the allowed source sending rate, our fuzzy-logic-based controller can measure the router queue size directly; hence it avoids various potential performance problems arising from parameter estimations while reducing much consumption of computation and memory resources in routers. As a network parameter, the queue size can be accurately monitored and used to proactively decide if action should be taken to regulate the source sending rate, thus increasing the resilience of the network to traffic congestion. The communication QoS (Quality of Service) is assured by the good performances of our scheme such as max-min fairness, low queueing delay and good robustness to network dynamics. Simulation results and comparisons have verified the effectiveness and showed that our new traffic management scheme can achieve better performances than the existing protocols that rely on the estimation of network parameters. View full abstract»

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  • Efficient Storage and Processing of High-Volume Network Monitoring Data

    Page(s): 162 - 175
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (939 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Monitoring modern networks involves storing and transferring huge amounts of data. To cope with this problem, in this paper we propose a technique that allows to transform the measurement data in a representation format meeting two main objectives at the same time. Firstly, it allows to perform a number of operations directly on the transformed data with a controlled loss of accuracy, thanks to the mathematical framework it is based on. Secondly, the new representation has a small memory footprint, allowing to reduce the space needed for data storage and the time needed for data transfer. To validate our technique, we perform an analysis of its performance in terms of accuracy and memory footprint. The results show that the transformed data closely approximates the original data (within 5% relative error) while achieving a compression ratio of 20%; storage footprint can also be gradually reduced towards the one of the state-of-the-art compression tools, such as bzip2, if higher approximation is allowed. Finally, a sensibility analysis show that technique allows to trade-off the accuracy on different input fields so to accommodate for specific application needs, while a scalability analysis indicates that the technique scales with input size spanning up to three orders of magnitude. View full abstract»

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  • Optimizing Link Sleeping Reconfigurations in ISP Networks with Off-Peak Time Failure Protection

    Page(s): 176 - 188
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (467 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Energy consumption in ISP backbone networks has been rapidly increasing with the advent of increasingly bandwidth-hungry applications. Network resource optimization through sleeping reconfiguration and rate adaptation has been proposed for reducing energy consumption when the traffic demands are at their low levels. It has been observed that many operational backbone networks exhibit regular diurnal traffic patterns, which offers the opportunity to apply simple time-driven link sleeping reconfigurations for energy-saving purposes. In this work, an efficient optimization scheme called Time-driven Link Sleeping (TLS) is proposed for practical energy management which produces an optimized combination of the reduced network topology and its unified off-peak configuration duration in daily operations. Such a scheme significantly eases the operational complexity at the ISP side for energy saving, but without resorting to complicated online network adaptations. The GÉANT network and its real traffic matrices were used to evaluate the proposed TLS scheme. Simulation results show that up to 28.3% energy savings can be achieved during off-peak operation without network performance deterioration. In addition, considering the potential risk of traffic congestion caused by unexpected network failures based on the reduced topology during off-peak time, we further propose a robust TLS scheme with Single Link Failure Protection (TLS-SLFP) which aims to achieve an optimized trade-off between network robustness and energy efficiency performance. View full abstract»

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  • Redundancy Management of Multipath Routing for Intrusion Tolerance in Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks

    Page(s): 189 - 203
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1812 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper we propose redundancy management of heterogeneous wireless sensor networks (HWSNs), utilizing multipath routing to answer user queries in the presence of unreliable and malicious nodes. The key concept of our redundancy management is to exploit the tradeoff between energy consumption vs. the gain in reliability, timeliness, and security to maximize the system useful lifetime. We formulate the tradeoff as an optimization problem for dynamically determining the best redundancy level to apply to multipath routing for intrusion tolerance so that the query response success probability is maximized while prolonging the useful lifetime. Furthermore, we consider this optimization problem for the case in which a voting-based distributed intrusion detection algorithm is applied to detect and evict malicious nodes in a HWSN. We develop a novel probability model to analyze the best redundancy level in terms of path redundancy and source redundancy, as well as the best intrusion detection settings in terms of the number of voters and the intrusion invocation interval under which the lifetime of a HWSN is maximized. We then apply the analysis results obtained to the design of a dynamic redundancy management algorithm to identify and apply the best design parameter settings at runtime in response to environment changes, to maximize the HWSN lifetime. View full abstract»

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  • Optimal Cache Timeout for Identifier-to-Locator Mappings with Handovers

    Page(s): 204 - 217
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1098 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The locator/ID separation protocol (LISP) proposed for addressing the scalability issue of the current Internet has gained much interest. LISP separates the identifier and locator roles of IP addresses by end point identifiers (EIDs) and locators, respectively. In particular, while EIDs are used in the application and transport layers for identifying nodes, locators are used in the network layer for locating nodes in the network topology. In LISP, packets are tunneled from ingress tunnel routers (ITRs) to egress tunnel routers in a map-and-encapsulation manner. For this purpose, an ITR caches on demand some mappings between EIDs and locators. Since hosts roam from place to place, however, their EID-to-locator mappings change accordingly. Thus, an ITR cannot store a mapping permanently but maintains for every mapping a timer whose default value is set to a given cache timeout. If the cache timeout for a mapping is too short, an ITR frequently queries the mapping system (control plane), resulting in a high traffic load on the control plane. On the other hand, if the cache timeout for a mapping is too long, the mapping could be outdated, resulting in packet loss and associated overheads. Therefore, it is desirable to set appropriate cache timeout for mapping items. In this paper, we analytically determine the optimal cache timeout for EID-to-locator mappings cached at ITRs to minimize the control plane load while remaining efficient for mobility. The results presented here provide valuable insights and guidelines for deploying LISP. View full abstract»

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  • A Dynamic Composition and Stubless Invocation Approach for Information-Providing Services

    Page(s): 218 - 230
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (969 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The automated specification and execution of composite services are important capabilities of service-oriented systems. In practice, service invocation is performed by client components (stubs) that are generated from service descriptions at design time. Several researchers have proposed mechanisms for late binding. They all require an object representation (e.g., Java classes) of the XML data types specified in service descriptions to be generated and meaningfully integrated in the client code at design time. However, the potential of dynamic composition can only be fully exploited if supported in the invocation phase by the capability of dynamically binding to services with previously unknown interfaces. In this work, we address this limitation by proposing a way of specifying and executing composite services, without resorting to previously compiled classes that represent XML data types. Semantic and structural properties encoded in service descriptions are exploited to implement a mechanism, based on the Graphplan algorithm, for the run-time specification of composite service plans. Composite services are then executed through the stubless invocation of constituent services. Stubless invocation is achieved by exploiting structural properties of service descriptions for the run-time generation of messages. View full abstract»

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  • Deadline-Based MapReduce Workload Management

    Page(s): 231 - 244
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1318 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a scheduling technique for multi-job MapReduce workloads that is able to dynamically build performance models of the executing workloads, and then use these models for scheduling purposes. This ability is leveraged to adaptively manage workload performance while observing and taking advantage of the particulars of the execution environment of modern data analytics applications, such as hardware heterogeneity and distributed storage. The technique targets a highly dynamic environment in which new jobs can be submitted at any time, and in which MapReduce workloads share physical resources with other workloads. Thus the actual amount of resources available for applications can vary over time. Beyond the formulation of the problem and the description of the algorithm and technique, a working prototype (called Adaptive Scheduler) has been implemented. Using the prototype and medium-sized clusters (of the order of tens of nodes), the following aspects have been studied separately: the scheduler's ability to meet high-level performance goals guided only by user-defined completion time goals; the scheduler's ability to favor data-locality in the scheduling algorithm; and the scheduler's ability to deal with hardware heterogeneity, which introduces hardware affinity and relative performance characterization for those applications that can benefit from executing on specialized processors. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Network and Service Management will publish (online only) peerreviewed archival quality papers that advance the state-of-the-art and practical applications of network and service management.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief

Rolf Stadler
Laboratory for Communication Networks
KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Stockholm
Sweden
stadler@kth.se