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Smart Grid, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 2013

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  • Table of Contents

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C1 - 650
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  • IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid publication information

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C2
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  • Advanced Metering for Phase Identification, Transformer Identification, and Secondary Modeling

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 651 - 658
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1667 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) offers utilities new ways to model and analyze distribution circuits. Results from two circuits introduce a new method to identify phasing of transformers and single-phase taps using voltage and kilowatt-hour measurements from AMI. In addition to phase identification, we show how to use the same approach to create or check meter-to-transformer mappings. These algorithms are based on linear regression and basic voltage drop relationships. With this approach, secondary connectivity and impedance models can be auto generated. In addition, detection of unmetered load appears possible. Also demonstrated is use of AMI to estimate primary-side voltage profiles. View full abstract»

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  • A Multiagent Modeling and Investigation of Smart Homes With Power Generation, Storage, and Trading Features

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 659 - 668
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1420 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Smart homes, as active participants in a smart grid, may no longer be modeled by passive load curves; because their interactive communication and bidirectional power flow within the smart grid affects demand, generation, and electricity rates. To consider such dynamic environmental properties, we use a multiagent-system-based approach in which individual homes are autonomous agents making rational decisions to buy, sell, or store electricity based on their present and expected future amount of load, generation, and storage, accounting for the benefits each decision can offer. In the proposed scheme, home agents prioritize their decisions based on the expected utilities they provide. Smart homes' intention to minimize their electricity bills is in line with the grid's aim to flatten the total demand curve. With a set of case studies and sensitivity analyses, we show how the overall performance of the home agents converges-as an emergent behavior-to an equilibrium benefiting both the entities in different operational conditions and determines the situations in which conventional homes would benefit from purchasing their own local generation-storage systems. View full abstract»

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  • Smart Personal Sensor Network Control for Energy Saving in DC Grid Powered LED Lighting System

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 669 - 676
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1123 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Emerging smart grid technologies aim to renovate traditional power grid by integrating intelligent devices and their communications for monitoring and automation of the power grid to enable efficient demand-side energy management. In this paper, energy management in smart dc building grid powered dc electrical appliances like lighting is investigated, in particular energy savings from proposed personal lighting management strategy. Unlike conventional fluorescent lamps powered mainly by ac grid, LED luminaires are dc in nature, thus results in significant power conversion losses, if operate on traditional ac powered system, are analyzed with proposed dc distribution building grid for LED lighting. This paper continues to explore the use of smart wireless sensors for personal control of the dc grid powered networked LED lighting. Experimental results show that the proposed smart LED lighting system with an energy saving mechanism incorporated is able to achieve similar lighting performance as the conventional lighting condition, while at the same time, able to attain about 44% energy saving as compared to the original ac fluorescent system. For a low voltage dc grid being implemented, the maximum power loss and voltage drop of the developed dc distribution building grid are 2.25% and 3% respectively. View full abstract»

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  • The Impact of Load Characterization on the Average Properties of Statistical Models for Powerline Channels

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 677 - 685
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1308 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper the impact of load characterization on the statistical modeling of indoor powerline channels is investigated in the bandwidth 100 kHz-50 MHz. Our analysis refers to the mean properties of such channels (so that their time-varying features are ignored) and is based on: a) the use of the statistical channel simulator, which has been validated through experimental measurements, described in ; b) the availability of a set of experimental results about the impedance of various appliances. Our numerical and experimental results evidence that, on the one hand, for frequencies beyond 20 MHz the influence of load characterization on the accuracy of statistical channel modelling is marginal; however, on the other hand, for frequencies in the order of 0-20 MHz the properties of the loads connected to a power network can appreciably affect the properties of the channel model. View full abstract»

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  • Intelligent Control of Ventilation System for Energy-Efficient Buildings With {\rm CO}_{2} Predictive Model

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 686 - 693
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    In this paper, an intelligent control strategy for ventilation systems in energy-efficient buildings is proposed. The design goal of the intelligent controller is to determine the optimal ventilation rate efficiently and accurately by maintaining the indoor concentration in the comfort zone with a reduced amount of energy consumption. In this study, the concentration is used as the indicator of human comfort in terms of indoor air quality. In addition, a predictive model is utilized to forecast the indoor concentration based on the occupancy pattern of buildings. Due to the high non-linearity of the model, particle swarm optimization (PSO) is applied to derive the optimal ventilation rate. Fuzzy technique is used to represent the relationship between the ventilation rate and the corresponding power consumption for mechanical ventilation systems. As compared with the traditional ON/OFF or fixed ventilation control scheme, the performance of the proposed intelligent control system has demonstrated its advantage in energy savings. Three case studies are analyzed in different situations and using different input parameters. The corresponding simulation results confirm the viability of the proposed intelligent control strategy for ventilation systems. View full abstract»

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  • An Intelligent Home Energy Management System to Improve Demand Response

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 694 - 701
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1042 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Demand Response (DR) and Time-of-Use (TOU) pricing refer to programs which offer incentives to customers who curtail their energy use during times of peak demand. In this paper, we propose an integrated solution to predict and re-engineer the electricity demand (e.g., peak load reduction and shift) in a locality at a given day/time. The system presented in this paper expands DR to residential loads by dynamically scheduling and controlling appliances in each dwelling unit. A decision-support system is developed to forecast electricity demand in the home and enable the user to save energy by recommending optimal run time schedules for appliances, given user constraints and TOU pricing from the utility company. The schedule is communicated to the smart appliances over a self-organizing home energy network and executed by the appliance control interfaces developed in this study. A predictor is developed to predict, based on the user's life style and other social/environmental factors, the potential schedules for appliance run times. An aggregator is used to accumulate predicted demand from residential customers. View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive Negotiation Agent for Facilitating Bi-Directional Energy Trading Between Smart Building and Utility Grid

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 702 - 710
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1593 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Smart and green buildings have attracted much attention in recent years. Development of an effective negotiation model for facilitating the bi-directional energy trading between the utility grid and the building is important for enhancing the building intelligence. In this paper, a negotiation agent based on adaptive attitude bidding strategy (AABS) is proposed. A comprehensive set of factors for the integrated smart building and utility grid system is taken into account in developing the negotiation model. The AABS based negotiation agent turns out to be able to dynamically adjust its behavior in response to varying attitudes in the negotiation process. In addition, an improved particle swarm optimization-adaptive attitude bidding strategy (PSO-AABS) based negotiation agent is developed for adaptively adjusting the trader's decisions according to the opponent's behaviors. It turns out to be capable of making rational deals in bi-directional energy trading by maximizing the trader's payoffs with reduced negotiation time. The feasibility of the proposed negotiation agents is evaluated by the simulation results. View full abstract»

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  • Optimal Planning and Routing in Medium Voltage PowerLine Communications Networks

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 711 - 719
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1463 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper deals with the problem of deploying a PowerLine Communication (PLC) network over a medium voltage (MV) power grid. The PLC network is used to connect the end nodes (ENs) of the MV grid to the service provider by means of PLC network nodes enabled as access points. In particular, a network planning problem is faced wherein we require to define the PLC network topology by deciding which MV network nodes are to be enabled as access points. An optimization problem is then formulated, which minimizes the cost of enabling the access points and maximizes the reliability of PLC network paths in a multi-objective optimization fashion. This work also considers resiliency (i.e., it guarantees the PLC network connectivity even in case of link faults) and capacity constraints (i.e., it checks that there are enough resources to transmit the estimated amount of traffic over the PLC network paths). As a byproduct, the optimization algorithm also returns the optimal routing. Simulations based on realistic MV network topologies validate the proposed approach. View full abstract»

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  • A Scalable Three-Step Approach for Demand Side Management of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 720 - 728
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1709 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we present a scalable approach for DSM (demand side management) of PHEVs (plug-in hybrid electric vehicles). Essentially, our approach consists of three steps: aggregation, optimization, and control. In the aggregation step, individual PHEV charging constraints are aggregated upwards in a tree structure. In the optimization step, the aggregated constraints are used for scalable computation of a collective charging plan, which minimizes costs for electricity supply. In the real-time control step, this charging plan is used to create an incentive signal for all PHEVs, determined by a market-based priority scheme. These three steps are executed iteratively to cope with uncertainty and dynamism. In simulation experiments, the proposed three-step approach is benchmarked against classic, fully centralized approaches. Results show that our approach is able to charge PHEVs with comparable quality to optimal, centrally computed charging plans, while significantly improving scalability. View full abstract»

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  • Using ICT-Controlled Plug-in Electric Vehicles to Supply Grid Regulation in California at Different Renewable Integration Levels

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 729 - 740
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1687 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify the potential for plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) to meet operating reserve requirements associated with increased deployment of wind and solar generation. The paper advances prior PEV estimates in three key ways. First, we employ easily implementable scheduling strategies with very low centralized computing requirements. Second, we estimate PEV availability based on data sampled from the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS). Third, we predict regulation demand on a per minute basis using published models from the California ISO for 20% and 33% renewable electricity supply. Our key results are as follows: First, the amount of regulation up and regulation down energy delivered by PEVs can be balanced by using a hybrid of two scheduling strategies. Second, the percentage of regulation energy that can be delivered with PEVs is always significantly higher than the percentage of conventional regulation power capacity that is deferred by PEVs. Third, regulation up is harder to satisfy with PEVs than regulation down. Fourth, the scheduling strategies we employ here have a limited impact on load following requirements. Our results indicate that 3 million PEVs could satisfy a significant portion-but not all-of the regulation energy and capacity requirements that are anticipated in California in 2020. View full abstract»

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  • Efficient Computation of Sensitivity Coefficients of Node Voltages and Line Currents in Unbalanced Radial Electrical Distribution Networks

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 741 - 750
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1797 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The problem of optimal control of power distribution systems is becoming increasingly compelling due to the progressive penetration of distributed energy resources in this specific layer of the electrical infrastructure. Distribution systems are, indeed, experiencing significant changes in terms of operation philosophies that are often based on optimal control strategies relying on the computation of linearized dependencies between controlled (e.g., voltages, frequency in case of islanding operation) and control variables (e.g., power injections, transformers tap positions). As the implementation of these strategies in real-time controllers imposes stringent time constraints, the derivation of analytical dependency between controlled and control variables becomes a non-trivial task to be solved. With reference to optimal voltage and power flow controls, this paper aims at providing an analytical derivation of node voltages and line currents as a function of the nodal power injections and transformers tap-changers positions. Compared to other approaches presented in the literature, the one proposed here is based on the use of the [Y] compound matrix of a generic multi-phase radial unbalanced network. In order to estimate the computational benefits of the proposed approach, the relevant improvements are also quantified versus traditional methods. The validation of the proposed method is carried out by using both IEEE 13 and 34 nodes test feeders. The paper finally shows the use of the proposed method for the problem of optimal voltage control applied to the IEEE 34 node test feeder. View full abstract»

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  • Power Flow Optimization for Smart Microgrids by SDP Relaxation on Linear Networks

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 751 - 762
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2180 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In a smart microgrid currents injected by distributed energy resources (DERs) and by the point of common coupling can be adapted to minimize the energy cost. Design and quality constraints usually make the problem grow fast with the number of nodes in the network. In this paper we provide a solution to the optimization problem having a significantly reduced complexity with respect to existing techniques. The efficiency of the proposed solution stems by modeling the smart microgrid as a linear network where loads are approximated as impedances. This simplification allows avoiding explicit use of power flow equations, and having a number of equation proportional to the number of DERs rather than to the total number of nodes (loads and DERs). The optimal power flow problem is then solved by a semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxation, which provides the initial point for the search of a feasible solution by a sequential convex programming procedure based on a local linear approximation of non-convex constraints. Numerical results show the merits of the proposed approach for typical smart microgrid scenarios. View full abstract»

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  • Simulative Comparison of Multiprotocol Label Switching and OpenFlow Network Technologies for Transmission Operations

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 763 - 770
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1301 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Utility companies are integrating multiprotocol label switching (MPLS) technologies into existing backbone networks, including networks between substations and control centers. MPLS has mechanisms for efficient overlay technologies as well as mechanisms to enhance security: features essential to the functioning of the smart grid. However, with MPLS routing and other switching technologies innovation is restricted to the features enclosed “in the box.” More specifically, there is no practical way for utility operators or researchers to test new ideas such as alternatives to IP or MPLS on a realistic scale to obtain the experience and confidence necessary for real world deployments. As a result, novel ideas go untested. Conversely, the OpenFlow framework has enabled significant advancements in network research. OpenFlow provides utility operators and researchers the programmability and flexibility necessary to enable innovation in next-generation communication architectures for the smart grid. This level of flexibility allows OpenFlow to provide all features of MPLS and also allows OpenFlow devices to co-exist with existing MPLS devices. The simulation results in this paper demonstrate that OpenFlow performs as well as MPLS, and may therefore be considered an alternative to MPLS for smart grid applications. View full abstract»

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  • Multi-Agent Based Hierarchical Hybrid Control for Smart Microgrid

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 771 - 778
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1382 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper studies the smart control issue for an autonomous microgrid in order to maintain the secure voltages as well as maximize economic and environmental benefits. A control scheme called as multi-agent based hierarchical hybrid control is proposed versus the hierarchical control requirements and hybrid dynamic behaviors of the microgrid. The control scheme is composed of an upper level energy management agent, several middle level coordinated control agents and many lower level unit control agents. The goals of smart control are achieved by designed control strategies. The simulations are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed smart control for an autonomous microgrid. View full abstract»

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  • Electric Vehicle Mobility in Transmission-Constrained Hourly Power Generation Scheduling

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 779 - 788
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1243 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The proposed approach evaluates the effect of integrating a large number of electric vehicles (EVs) on power grid operation and control. The EV fleets could serve as electricity load when drawing energy from the grid and as energy storage (vehicle-to-grid) when delivering energy to the grid. The paper considers two operating modes for EV fleets which are consumer-controlled and grid-controlled. The power grid generation mix represents a multitude of units including thermal, hydro, and wind. The paper considers the impact of EV battery utilization on offsetting the hourly variability of wind generation units in transmission-constrained power grids. The paper considers charging/discharging schedule of EV batteries and consumer driving requirements on the optimal hourly transmission-constrained commitment and dispatch of generation units in the day-ahead scheduling. The hourly solution of the proposed method will minimize the cost of supplying the hourly load while satisfying the temporal constraints of individual components in power grids. View full abstract»

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  • Optimal Control of End-User Energy Storage

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 789 - 797
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2434 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An increasing number of retail energy markets show price fluctuations, providing users with the opportunity to buy energy at lower than average prices. We propose to temporarily store this inexpensive energy in a battery, and use it to satisfy demand when energy prices are high, thus allowing users to exploit the price variations without having to shift their demand to the low-price periods. We study the battery control policy that yields the best performance, i.e., minimizes the total discounted costs. The optimal policy is shown to have a threshold structure, and we derive these thresholds in a few special cases. The cost savings obtained from energy storage are demonstrated through extensive numerical experiments, and we offer various directions for future research. View full abstract»

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  • Distribution Power Flow Management Utilizing an Online Constraint Programming Method

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 798 - 805
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (981 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a novel active power flow management (PFM) method for managing multiple distributed generator (DG) units connected to medium voltage distribution networks. The method uses the artificial intelligence technique of constraint programming to autonomously manage DG real power outputs and offers flexible and network agnostic characteristics. The method is assessed using multiple scenarios on two real case study networks to examine simulated closed-loop control actions under certain thermal excursions. The test cases are explored with algorithms implemented, in software, on commercially available substation computing hardware to identify computation timescales and investigate algorithm robustness when presented with measurement error. The archival value of this paper is in the specification and evaluation of a novel application of the constraint programming technique for online control of DG in thermally constrained distribution networks. View full abstract»

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  • Fully Distributed Coordination of Multiple DFIGs in a Microgrid for Load Sharing

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 806 - 815
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2146 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    When wind power penetration is high, the available generation may be more than needed, especially for wind-powered microgrids working autonomously. Because the maximum peak power tracking algorithm may result in a supply-demand imbalance, an alternative algorithm is needed for load sharing. In this paper, a fully distributed control scheme is presented to coordinate the operations of multiple doubly-fed induction generators (DFIGs) in a microgrid. According to the proposed control strategy, each bus in a microgrid has an associated bus agent that may have two function modules. The global information discovery module discovers the total available wind generation and total demand. The load sharing control module calculates the generation reference of a DFIG. The consensus-based algorithm can guarantee convergence for microgrids of arbitrary topologies under various operating conditions. By controlling the utilization levels of DFIGs to a common value, the supply-demand balance can be maintained. In addition, the detrimental impact of inaccurate and outdated predictions of maximum wind power can be alleviated. The generated control references are tracked by coordinating converter controls and pitch angle control. Simulation results with a 5-DFIG microgrid demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. View full abstract»

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  • Residential Distribution System Harmonic Compensation Using PV Interfacing Inverter

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 816 - 827
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3198 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The increased non-linear loads in today's typical home are a growing concern for utility companies. This situation might be worsened by the harmonic resonance introduced by the installation of capacitor banks in the distribution network. To mitigate the harmonic distortions, passive or active filters are typically used. However, with the increasing implementation of distributed generation (DG) in residential areas, using DG systems to improve the power quality is becoming a promising idea, particularly because many DG systems, such as photovoltaic (PV), wind and fuel cells, have DG-grid interfacing converters. In this paper, the potential for using photovoltaic (PV) interfacing inverters to compensate the residential system harmonics is explored. A system model including the residential load and DG is first developed. An in-depth analysis and comparison of different compensation schemes based on the virtual harmonic damping impedance concept are then carried out. The effects of the capacitor banks in the system are also studied. The effectiveness of the harmonic compensation strategies under different conditions is verified through analysis and simulations. View full abstract»

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  • Distributed Control of the Power Supply-Demand Balance

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 828 - 836
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1610 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper aims to achieve a balance of power in a group of prosumers, based on a price mechanism, i.e., to steer the difference between the total production and consumption of power to zero. We first set the information network topology such that the prosumers exchange price (power) information with their neighbors according to a chosen information network topology. Based on the exchanged information and the prosumers own measured power demand, each prosumer uses a local control strategy to turn on and off its power generator to cooperatively achieve the global balance. More specifically, the local control strategy results from a distributed model predictive control method based on dual decomposition and sub-gradient iterations. The method achieves a unique dynamic price signal for each prosumer. Simulation results with realistic data validate the method. View full abstract»

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  • Smart Meter Privacy: A Theoretical Framework

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 837 - 846
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1470 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The solutions offered to-date for end-user privacy in smart meter measurements, a well-known challenge in the smart grid, have been tied to specific technologies such as batteries or assumptions on data usage without quantifying the loss of benefit (utility) that results from any such approach. Using tools from information theory and a hidden Markov model for the measurements, a new framework is presented that abstracts both the privacy and the utility requirements of smart meter data. This leads to a novel privacy-utility tradeoff problem with minimal assumptions that is tractable. For a stationary Gaussian model of the electricity load, it is shown that for a desired mean-square distortion (utility) measure between the measured and revealed data, the optimal privacy-preserving solution: i) exploits the presence of high-power but less private appliance spectra as implicit distortion noise, and ii) filters out frequency components with lower power relative to a distortion threshold; this approach encompasses many previously proposed approaches to smart meter privacy. View full abstract»

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  • Cyber-Physical Security Testbeds: Architecture, Application, and Evaluation for Smart Grid

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 847 - 855
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (932 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The development of a smarter electric grid will depend on increased deployments of information and communication technology (ICT) to support novel communication and control functions. Unfortunately, this additional dependency also expands the risk from cyber attacks. Designing systems with adequate cyber security depends heavily on the availability of representative environments, such as testbeds, where current issues and future ideas can be evaluated. This paper provides an overview of a smart grid security testbed, including the set of control, communication, and physical system components required to provide an accurate cyber-physical environment. It then identifies various testbed research applications and also identifies how various components support these applications. The PowerCyber testbed at Iowa State University is then introduced, including the architecture, applications, and novel capabilities, such as virtualization, Real Time Digital Simulators (RTDS), and ISEAGE WAN emulation. Finally, several attack scenarios are evaluated using the testbed to explore cyber-physical impacts. In particular, availability and integrity attacks are demonstrated with both isolated and coordinated approaches, these attacks are then evaluated based on the physical system's voltage and rotor angle stability. View full abstract»

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  • On the Exact Solution to a Smart Grid Cyber-Security Analysis Problem

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 856 - 865
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2147 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper considers a smart grid cyber-security problem analyzing the vulnerabilities of electric power networks to false data attacks. The analysis problem is related to a constrained cardinality minimization problem. The main result shows that an relaxation technique provides an exact optimal solution to this cardinality minimization problem. The proposed result is based on a polyhedral combinatorics argument. It is different from well-known results based on mutual coherence and restricted isometry property. The results are illustrated on benchmarks including the IEEE 118-bus, IEEE 300-bus, and the Polish 2383-bus and 2736-bus systems. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid is a cross disciplinary and internationally archival journal aimed at disseminating results of research on smart grid that relates to, arises from, or deliberately influences energy generation, transmission, distribution and delivery. The journal publishes original research on theories and development on principles of smart grid technologies and systems. The Transactions also welcomes manuscripts on design, implementation and evaluation of power systems that are affected by smart grid. Surveys of existing work on smart grid may also be considered for publication when they propose a new viewpoint on history and a challenging perspective on the future of smart grid.

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Editor-in-Chief
Jianhui Wang
Argonne National Laboratory