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IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 1981

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 27
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s): c1
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  • [Inside front cover]

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s): c2
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  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s): 1
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  • Preface

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):154 - 155
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  • Writing resumes and cover letters

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):156 - 160
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  • The new you — Researched, resumed, and rarin' to go

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):160 - 162
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (481 KB)

    Writing a résumé may be one of the most difficult things you will ever do. Accordingly, says the author, it is extremely important that you write it. A distinction is made between a chronological and a functional résumé and advice is offered on when to use which. Once the résumé is ready, you should practice your interviewing skills by rehearsing as much a... View full abstract»

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  • The cover letter

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):163 - 165
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  • Business interviews — Frequent questions, acceptable answers

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):165 - 168
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (597 KB)

    Most employment interviewers ask essentially the same set of questions. The author identifies the ten most frequently recurring questions and suggests what inferences are likely to be drawn from giving certain answers. Consequently, the potential interviewee is advised to prepare responses to each before the job interview. Other suggestions include (1) asking questions of the interviewer, (2) proj... View full abstract»

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  • Writing training materials that turn people on

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):169 - 171
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (452 KB)

    Long after a training program ends, the written materials continue to do a training job. good or bad, and to create an impression in people's minds. Good training materials must be well organized, clear and courteous, neat looking, and non-sexist. A full, accurate overview at the beginning is the most important feature of good organizing. Plain, conversational English makes the writing clear and c... View full abstract»

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  • Guidelines for writing for publication

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):172 - 175
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (660 KB)

    An abstract and an outline are the initial means to interest an editor in your work. The editor has to decide — in the context of the publication's audience — what you will tell readers that they don't already know, whether they would want the information, and how they could use the information. To proceed beyond the proposal, write the “meat” of the article first; then... View full abstract»

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  • The process model of document design

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):176 - 178
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (406 KB)

    Writing is described as a process of document design. In the first stage, pre-design, the writer considers scope, purpose, audience, task, and constraints. In the design stage the writer sets the logic of the presentation, tailors the content to the audience, ensures that the language is understandable, and plans graphics to reduce the burden of reading. Reviewing, testing, editing, and revising a... View full abstract»

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  • How to polish your writing

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):179 - 181
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (525 KB)

    Writing clearly and persuasively is perceived as a factor in business and social success. But writing well-structured English is not equivalent to communicating; nor is command of a large vocabulary. The key writing talent is constructing paragraphs and organizing them into a rational and persuasive whole. Thinking through what you want to say and to whom you want to say it can make the writing ta... View full abstract»

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  • Human dimensions for inanimate objects?

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):182 - 183
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (279 KB)

    Active expressions like “the table lists” and “the figure shows” are preferable to passive sentences beginning “data are listed” and “results are displayed.” Convening information clearly and vigorously is often more important than rigorous adherence to semantics. However, data and results shouldn't “argue” or “proclaim&#... View full abstract»

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  • Business writing — Clear and simple

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):184 - 185
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (317 KB)

    Verbosity matters. Baffled readers may interpret verbosity as an attempt to impress, or to mask ignorance. Clear, effective language is essential to technical work. If technical language doesn't provide understandability, explain a concept less precisely in plain English. Spoken language is generally simpler than written language; use it as a guide. Make each word justify its existence. Ask yourse... View full abstract»

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  • Did you read the instructions carefully?

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):185 - 186
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (316 KB)

    How-to-use-a-product instructions should be written at the user's level, not by mechanical engineers or electronics designers; they are the key to consumer satisfaction. Clarity is more important than correct technical terminology. Color coding and numbers make more sense than tortuous sentences. Accurate illustrations are probably the secret of success. View full abstract»

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  • When and how to argue

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):186 - 188
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (437 KB)

    Arguing is presenting an opposite, alternative, or different viewpoint and the reasons for your opinion. The author warns us to consider the consequences of arguing by deciding what can be gained or lost. We often waste our time (and the time of others) by not being aware of the difference between what to argue and, how to argue. What to argue calls for considering the problem's permanence, its se... View full abstract»

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  • Getting the most out of seminars: Listening by objectives

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):189 - 191
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (395 KB)

    Even the best seminar is wasted if its participants are neither motivated nor trained to listen by objectives; the success of a seminar depends more on the participant than on the presenter. Participants can prepare for a seminar by (1) setting objectives for attending, (2) assessing their attitudes and beliefs relevant to the subject, and (3) formulating strategies for listening to and seeking ne... View full abstract»

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  • Executive interviews: Do you or don't you?

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):192 - 194
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    Increasing public interest in the electronic media for news and information coupled with declining public trust in business leaders is creating opportunities for executives to be interviewed to tell “the corporate story.” To ensure that interview time is not wasteful or destructive, interviewees should prepare seriously. For example: Have a communications objective; consider the repo... View full abstract»

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  • The written speech

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):195 - 196
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (303 KB)

    This paper provides a brief description of key points an engineer or scientist should consider when preparing a written presentation that is to be read aloud. Planning, organizing, and presentation methods allow a speaker to review his material and improve any areas which appear weak. Word selection, text preparation, line spacing, and presentation guides are provided. Phrase typing is introduced ... View full abstract»

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  • Next slide please

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):196 - 197
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (297 KB)

    Why audiences walk out — a running monolog that catalogs the depressingly common defects of a presentation at a technical society meeting. View full abstract»

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  • On learning where to begin, how to listen, and when to stop

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):197 - 198
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (287 KB)

    Like a two-legged stool, language and content in technical writing do not stand alone. The finished product must meet requirements and satisfy constraints — the moral of this tale. View full abstract»

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  • Word watching: Single or double consonant?

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s):199 - 201
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (298 KB)

    Deciding whether to double the final consonant of a word before adding ed or ing is a common problem. Grouping the words that take these endings according to how they are accented makes learning and remembering the correct spellings easier. More than 100 verbs are grouped into seven categories. One of the more difficult to remember categories is guided by this rule: If the accent is on the first s... View full abstract»

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  • Putt's law and the successful technocrat - Archibald Putt

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s): 202
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  • Call for papers special issue: Interpreting technology

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s): 203
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  • Information for authors and readers of the IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication

    Publication Year: 1981, Page(s): 204
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to applied research on professional communication--including but not limited to technical and business communication. It has been published since 1957 by the Professional Communication Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
George F. Hayhoe
Mercer University School of Eng.