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Spectrum, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1974

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 47
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Inside front cover]

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): c2
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  • [Advertisements]

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 1
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  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • [Advertisements]

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 4 - 7
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  • Meetings

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 8 - 13
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  • Calendar

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 14 - 16
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  • News from Washington

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 17
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  • Energy report

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 18 - 19
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  • Focal points: A review of current developments

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 20 - 22
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  • Forum

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 23 - 28
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  • Spectral lines: Energy crisis: Seeking the real alternatives

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 29
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    What should be the role of the technologist in communicating with the “average citizen,” who knows only that fuel and electric power are in such short supply that his life style is affected? A desirable outcome that could result from a more thorough delineation of the many tradeoffs available to the U.S. and other developed countries in piloting their way to a more stable and satisfactory world energy situation is a citizenry that is “comfortable” in its knowledge that options do exist. A public that is aware of the real alternatives along with their consequences is less likely to react in ways that cause the situation to deteriorate. Such was the conclusion of a workshop of concerned engineers and scientists meeting recently on the topic of energy resources. View full abstract»

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  • Spectral report: Technology '74

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 30 - 31
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    The experts analyze the immediate past to help define significant hard/software trends for the year ahead. Solid-state and computer technology pervade many of the most significant new electrical/electronic developments. View full abstract»

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  • Communications and microwaves: A good spectrum stretcher is hard to find. Reaching toward light frequencies seems a good alternative

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 32 - 36
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    Ever-increasing demands for transmission bandwidth are pressing communications technology towards light-frequencies. The aim is to enlarge the strained information-carrying capacity of atmosphere-borne communications and, equally vital, to increase the number and capacity of earth-bound channels. View full abstract»

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  • Data communications: “I'm all digital,” said one computer to the other. “So'm I,” the other replied, “Let's trade packets!”

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 36 - 39
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    Millions of computer terminals are expected to dot the U.S. landscape during the next few years, and they will tie into tens of thousands of interconnected computers in hundreds of different commercial, industrial, Government, and educational networks. The needed links between widely dispersed equipment will be provided by data communications facilities. View full abstract»

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  • Computer hardware/software: Hardware: Microprocessors and memories marry software: Modular programs and “kernels” arrive

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 39 - 43
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    The great new fact in computer technology is that we now have large-scale integrated microprocessors. Major semiconductor manufacturers are beginning to supply off-the-shelf microprocessors, and sixteen-bit units with 2- to 3-μs instruction times are now available in chip form for about $150. View full abstract»

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  • Industrial electronics: “Computers and solid state are in…computers and solid state are in…computers and solid state…”

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 44 - 53
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    Automation was the key to progress for industrial systems during 1973, with the second-generation controller emerging as the most exciting system and the thyristor the all-pervasive device. View full abstract»

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  • Circuit/system building blocks: Recent new devices are faster, and cheaper, and provide a higher function density

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 54 - 60
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    The growth of consumer electronics, especially in hand-held calculators, electronic watches, and the burgeoning automotive market has spurred development of low-cost, low-power displays. The leading contenders at this time are light-emitting diodes, liquid crystals, and plasma displays. Also, undergoing serious development are potential substitutes for the cathode ray tube in large displays and in television. The strong interest in this new field, coupled with rapid strides being made in developing new display techniques and lowering production costs, makes display technology one of the most dynamic areas of electronics. View full abstract»

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  • Power/energy: Problems and progress: Global politics has fueled an overdue search by the industrial nations for new energy sources

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 60 - 65
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    At the outset of this new year, electric power engineers are still confronted by a forecast of increased electric energy requirements that, apparently, have not been modified by the tightening fuel/energy bind. View full abstract»

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  • Progress in rail transportation: Next: London to Paris in just over 3 hours, and a fast ride from Oakland to San Francisco for 60 cents

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 66 - 70
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    Similar perhaps in technologies, 1973 transportation schemes differed considerably in priorities from nation to nation. The U.S., while toying with the interurban Amtrak network, primarily concentrated on its commuter plans — BART, its already operating model system, and PRT (personalized rapid transit), a scheme for the urban future. View full abstract»

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  • Military and aerospace: Dollars for many projects may be grounded, but efforts to spend wisely are soaring

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 71 - 77
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    Where high-level technology is concerned, questions of cost-benefits and funding now often rival the once dominant hardware and engineering problems as major program challenges. Space shuttle proponents point to significant savings expected over the comparatively inefficient Saturn/Apollo launch and recovery system and indicate that a wide cross section of scientific interests will profit from direct access to extraterrestrial experimentation. Even engineering work on unmanned flights is geared toward squeezing a better power/weight ratio out of solar cells, storage batteries, and power control electronics. As a direct result of the Mideast war, budgeting for U.S. military R&D must now confront the immediate challenges of new Soviet ECM and their SA-6 surface-to-air missile as opposed to projected and perhaps speculative benefits claimed for the billion dollar Trident submarine program. View full abstract»

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  • Consumer electronics: From calculators and cameras galore to video recorders, the shopping list grows

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 78 - 79
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    Evidence of the vast inroads of electronics into the consumer market is all around us. The steady drop in integrated circuit costs has, on the one hand, put $29.95 calculators on the market and, on the other, made possible the introduction of sophisticated electronic cameras, electronic ranges, and — want it or not — seat-belt interlock systems for the family car.1,2 Consumer products that would have been too expensive to be marketable a few years ago — if, indeed, they could have been produced at all — are now on the market and all indications point to the fact that more are on the way. View full abstract»

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  • Technology in health care: Medical “early warning systems” may lighten the load on patient treatment systems

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 80 - 81
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    Health care delivery today is beset by mounting costs and the demand for better care from an ever-increasing portion of the population. It would seem, then, that any device, technique, or system that could help reduce costs and/or do a job faster or better should be welcomed with open arms. But even though technology can help reduce costs — if quality remains fixed — it is more apt to raise costs when improving quality in some manner. And even then, according to some physicians1, the major emphasis on technology in the health care system has been at the end point — in treatment, rather than in diagnosis. It is easier to instrument an intensive care unit with monitors, for example, than it is to design systems that will permit early identification of medical problems. View full abstract»

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  • Instruments and test equipment: Computers have snuggled into the measurements domain to tackle new tasks

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 82 - 84
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    In view of 1973's $2.5 billion market for instruments and controls — which according to the U.S. Department of Commerce reflects an overall 11-percent increase in total electronics business over 1972 — there is every indication that the instrumentation market will continue to thrive in 1974. View full abstract»

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  • Systems and cybernetics: Tools of the discipline are progressing from the inspirational to the practical

    Publication Year: 1974 , Page(s): 85
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    Be they living animals, machine systems, or human societies, the internal control and communication functions can be broken down and studied with the tools of systems engineering and cybernetics. This is a diverse field encompassing (a) integration of communication, control, cybernetics, and systems theories; (b) development of systems engineering technology; and (c) practical applications at both the hardware and software levels. View full abstract»

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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine