By Topic

Automation Science and Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date April 2013

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 31
  • Table of Contents

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (141 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Automation Science and Engineering publication information

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (156 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest Editorial Exciting Trends for Automation in Manufacturing

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 225 - 226
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (98 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Polyhedral Assembly Partitioning With Infinite Translations or The Importance of Being Exact

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 227 - 241
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1837 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Assembly partitioning with an infinite translation is the application of an infinite translation to partition an assembled product into two complementing subsets of parts, referred to as subassemblies, each treated as a rigid body. We present an exact implementation of an efficient algorithm to obtain such a motion and subassemblies given an assembly of polyhedra in R3. We do not assume general position. Namely, we handle degenerate input, and produce exact results. As often occurs, motions that partition a given assembly or subassembly might be isolated in the infinite space of motions. Any perturbation of the input or of intermediate results, caused by, for example, imprecision, might result with dismissal of valid partitioning-motions. In the extreme case, where there is only a finite number of valid partitioning-motions, no motion may be found, even though such exists. The implementation is based on software components that have been developed and introduced only recently. They paved the way to a complete, efficient, and concise implementation. Additional information is available at http://acg.cs.tau.ac.il/projects/assembly-partitioning/project-page. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Mobile Phones as Seismologic Sensors: Automating Data Extraction for the iShake System

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 242 - 251
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1126 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    There are a variety of approaches to seismic sensing, which range from collecting sparse measurements with high-fidelity seismic stations to non-quantitative, post-earthquake surveys. The sparse nature of the high-fidelity stations and the inaccuracy of the surveys create the need for a high-density, semi-quantitative approach to seismic sensing. To fill this void, the UC Berkeley iShake project designed a mobile client-backend server architecture that uses sensor-equipped mobile devices to measure earthquake ground shaking. iShake provides the general public with a service to more easily contribute more quantitatively significant data to earthquake research by automating the data collection and reporting mechanisms via the iShake mobile application. The devices act as distributed sensors that enable measurements to be taken and transmitted with a cellular network connection. Shaking table testing was used to assess the quality of the measurements obtained from the iPhones and iPods on a benchmark of 150 ground motions. Once triggered by a shaking event, the devices transmit sensor data to a backend server for further processing. After a seismic event is verified by high-fidelity stations, filtering algorithms are used to detect falling phones, as well as device-specific responses to the event. A method was developed to determine the absolute orientation of a device to estimate the direction of first motion of a seismic event. A “virtual earthquake” pilot test was conducted on the UC Berkeley campus to verify the operation of the iShake system. By designing and fully implementing a system architecture, developing signal processing techniques unique to mobile sensing, and conducting shaking table tests to confirm the validity of the sensing platform, the iShake project serves as foundational work for further studies in seismic sensing on mobile devices. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Design, Simulation, and Fabrication of Microneedles and a Blood Filter for Use in a Hemofiltration System

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 252 - 266
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4418 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper deals with the design of a new hemofiltration system that consists of a blood transport device, a blood filtration device, a drug delivery device, flow sensors, blood pressure sensors, and the required control electronic circuits. The simulation and fabrication of microneedles and hemofilter have been performed. Silicon microneedles with length (L) = 200 μm, internal diameter (Di) = 60 μ m, and outer diameter (Do) = 150 μm have been successfully fabricated using inductive coupled plasma (ICP) etching technology for drug delivery. An aluminum (Al)-based hemofilter with hexagonal pores has been fabricated for blood filtration. Strength modeling and microfluidic analyses of the hemofilter have been conducted in finite element software to envisage structural properties and to model blood flow through the hexagonal pores. Simulation results show that a flow rate of 488.43 μL/min has been obtained at a driving pressure of 250 kPa through a hemofilter with hexagonal pores. Transient multifield analysis of the blood transport device (double lumen, side open, reservoir-based microneedles integrated with a piezoelectric actuator) has been conducted using the finite element method. The effects of actuator thickness, applied frequency and voltage on fluid flow rate have been investigated using the blood transport device. A maximum flow rate of 475 μL/min has been observed through 25 microneedles at an applied voltage of 125 V with a frequency of 250 Hz. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Experimental Analysis of Laser Interferometry-Based Robust Motion Tracking Control of a Flexure-Based Mechanism

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 267 - 275
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1651 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents experimental analysis of laser interferometry-based closed-loop robust motion tracking control for flexure-based four-bar micro/nano manipulator. To enhance the accuracy of micro/nano manipulation, laser interferometry realized robust motion tracking control is established with the experimental facility. This paper contains brief discussions about the error sources associated with the laser interferometry-based sensing and measurement technique, along with detailed error analysis and estimation. Comparative error analysis of capacitive position sensor-based system and laser interferometry-based system is also presented. Robust control demonstrates high precision and accurate motion tracking of the four-bar flexure-based mechanism. The experimental results demonstrate precise motion tracking, where resultant closed-loop position tracking error is of the order of ± 20 nm, and a steady-state error of about ±10 nm. With the experimental study and error analysis, we offer evidence that the laser interferometry-based closed-loop robust motion tracking control can minimize positioning and tracking errors during dynamic motion. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • AFAM: An Articulated Four Axes Microrobot for Nanoscale Applications

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 276 - 284
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2030 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents a microassembled robot called the Articulated Four Axes Microrobot (AFAM). Target application areas include micro and nano part manipulation and probing. The robot consists of a cantilever actuated along four axes: in-place X, Y and YAW ; out-of-plane pitch. The microrobot size spans a total volume of 3 mm × 1.5 × 1 mm (XYZ), and operates within a workspace envelope of 50 μm × 50 μm × 75 μm (XYZ). This is by far the largest operating envelope of any micropositioner with nonplanar dexterity. As a result it can be classified as a new type of three-dimensional microrobot and a candidate for miniaturizing top-down assembly systems to dimensions under 1 cm3. A key feature in this design is a cable-like microwire that transforms in-plane actuator displacement into out-of-plane pitch and yaw motion (via flexure joints). Finite-element analysis simulation followed by microfabrication and assembly processes developed to prototype the designs are described. The microrobot is designed to carry an AFM tip as the end effector and accomplish nanoindentation on a polymer surface. The tip attachment technique and nanoindentation experiments have also been described in this paper. Open loop precision has been characterized using a laser interferometer which measured an average resolution of 50 nm along XYZ, repeatability of 100 nm and accuracy of 500 nm. Experiments to determine microrobot reliability are also presented. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • AFM-Based Robotic Nano-Hand for Stable Manipulation at Nanoscale

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 285 - 295
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1738 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    One of the major limitations for Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)-based nanomanipulation is that AFM only has one sharp tip as the end-effector, and can only apply a point force to the nanoobject, which makes it extremely difficult to achieve a stable manipulation. For example, the AFM tip tends to slip-away during nanoparticle manipulation due to its small touch area, and there is no available strategy to manipulate a nanorod in a constant posture with a single tip since the applied point force can make the nanorod rotate more easily. In this paper, a robotic nano-hand method is proposed to solve these problems. The basic idea is using a single tip to mimic the manipulation effect that multi-AFM tip can achieve through the planned high speed sequential tip pushing. The theoretical behavior models of nanoparticle and nanorod are developed, based on which the moving speed and trajectory of the AFM tip are planned artfully to form a nano-hand. In this way, the slip-away problem during nanoparticle manipulation can be get rid of efficiently, and a posture constant manipulation for nanorod can be achieved. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and advantages of the proposed method. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Geometric Distribution Reader Anti-Collision Protocol for RFID Dense Reader Environments

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 296 - 306
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1894 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Dense passive radio frequency identification (RFID) systems are particularly susceptible to reader collision problems, categorized by reader-to-tag and reader-to-reader collisions. Both may degrade the system performance decreasing the number of identified tags per time unit. Although many proposals have been suggested to avoid or handle these collisions, most of them are not compatible with current standards and regulations, require extra hardware and do not make an efficient use of the network resources. This paper proposes the Geometric Distribution Reader Anti-collision (GDRA), a new centralized scheduler that exploits the Sift geometric probability distribution function to minimize reader collision problems. GDRA provides higher throughput than the state-of-the-art proposals for dense reader environments and, unlike the majority of previous works, GDRA is compliant with the EPCglobal standard and ETSI EN 302 208 regulation, and can be implemented in real RFID systems without extra hardware. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An Effective Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm for a Real-World Hybrid Flowshop Problem in Steelmaking Process

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 307 - 322
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2042 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper aims to provide a solution method for the real-world hybrid flowshop scheduling problem resulting from a steelmaking process, which has important applications in modern iron and steel industry. We first present a mixed integer mathematic model based on a comprehensive investigation. Then, we develop a heuristic method and two improvement procedures for a given schedule based on the problem-specific characteristics. Finally, we propose an effective artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm with the job-permutation-based representation for solving the scheduling problem. The proposed ABC algorithm incorporates the heuristic and improvement procedures as well as new characteristics including a neighboring solution generation method and two enhanced strategies. To evaluate the proposed algorithm, we present several adaptations of other well-known and recent metaheuristics to the problem and conduct a serial of experiments with the instances generated according to real-world production process. The results show that the proposed ABC algorithm is more effective than all other adaptations after comprehensive computational comparisons and statistical analysis. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Coordinated Iterative Learning Control Schemes for Train Trajectory Tracking With Overspeed Protection

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 323 - 333
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3615 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This work embodies the overspeed protection and safe headway control into an iterative learning control (ILC) based train trajectory tracking algorithm to satisfy the high safety requirement of high-speed railways. First, a D-type ILC scheme with overspeed protection is proposed. Then, a corresponding coordinated ILC scheme with multiple trains is studied to keep the safe headway. Finally, the control scheme under traction/braking force constraint is also considered for this proposed ILC-based train trajectory tracking strategy. Rigorous theoretical analysis has shown that the proposed control schemes can guarantee the asymptotic convergence of train speed and position to its desired profiles without requirement of the physical model aside from some mild assumptions on the system. Effectiveness is further evaluated through simulations. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Energy Saving Opportunity Analysis of Automotive Serial Production Systems (March 2012)

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 334 - 342
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1584 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Conventionally, improving production efficiency, flexibility and responsiveness has been the primary research focus of production management, while energy consumption has received relatively little attention. Energy consumption plays a more and more important role in the manufacturing environment. This is mainly driven by energy cost and environmental concerns. When the energy system becomes complicated and coupled with ongoing production, it is very difficult to hunt the “hidden treasure” which affects the overall benefit of a manufacturing system. This paper provides a systematic method to search for energy saving opportunities and strategies. We start from dynamic production transient analysis and provide quantitative analysis for identifying energy saving opportunity in a system. Furthermore, energy saving strategy is justified through cost analysis for tradeoffs between energy savings and throughput loss. A case study is conducted to demonstrate its potential on energy savings in a multistage manufacturing system. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Swarm Intelligence Approaches to Optimal Power Flow Problem With Distributed Generator Failures in Power Networks

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 343 - 353
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2027 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Distributed generation becomes more and more important in modern power systems. However, the increasing use of distributed generators causes the concerns on the increasing system risk due to their likely failure or uncontrollable power outputs based on such renewable energy sources as wind and the sun. This work for the first time formulates an optimal power flow problem by considering controllable and uncontrollable distributed generators in power networks. The problem for the cases of single and multiple generator failures is addressed as an example. The methods are presented to find its power output solution of controllable online generators via particle swarm optimization and group search optimizer for coping with the difficult scenarios in a power network. The proposed methods are tested on an IEEE 14-bus system, and several population initialization strategies are investigated and compared for the algorithms. The simulation results confirm their effectiveness for optimal power management and effective control of a power network. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Adaptive Dispatching Rule for Semiconductor Wafer Fabrication Facility

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 354 - 364
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1952 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Uncertainty in semiconductor fabrication facilities (fabs) requires scheduling methods to attain quick real-time responses. They should be well tuned to track the changes of a production environment to obtain better operational performance. This paper presents an adaptive dispatching rule (ADR) whose parameters are determined dynamically by real-time information relevant to scheduling. First, we introduce the workflow of ADR that considers both batch and non-batch processing machines to obtain improved fab-wide performance. It makes use of such information as due date of a job, workload of a machine, and occupation time of a job on a machine. Then, we use a backward propagation neural network (BPNN) and a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to find the relations between weighting parameters and real-time state information to adapt these parameters dynamically to the environment. Finally, a real fab simulation model is used to demonstrate the proposed method. The simulation results show that ADR with constant weighting parameters outperforms the conventional dispatching rule on average; ADR with changing parameters tracking real-time production information over time is more robust than ADR with constant ones; and further improvements can be obtained by optimizing the weights and threshold values of BPNN with a PSO algorithm. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Development and Evaluation of Object-Based Visual Attention for Automatic Perception of Robots

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 365 - 379
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3224 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Bottom-up visual attention is an automatic behavior to guide visual perception to a conspicuous object in a scene. This paper develops a new object-based bottom-up attention (OBA) model for robots. This model includes four modules: Extraction of preattentive features, preattentive segmentation, estimation of space-based saliency, and estimation of proto-object-based saliency. In terms of computation, preattentive segmentation serves as a bridge to connect the space-based saliency and object-based saliency. This paper therefore proposes a preattentive segmentation algorithm, which is able to self-determine the number of proto-objects, has low computational cost, and is robust in a variety of conditions such as noise and spatial transformations. Experimental results have shown that the proposed OBA model outperforms space-based attention model and other object-based attention methods in terms of accuracy of attentional selection, consistency under a series of noise settings and object completion. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An Integrated Two-Level Self-Calibration Method for a Cable-Driven Humanoid Arm

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 380 - 391
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3221 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper addresses the kinematic calibration issues for a 7-DOF cable-driven humanoid arm in order to improve its motion control accuracy. The proposed 7-DOF humanoid arm has a hybrid parallel-serial kinematic structure, which consists of three serially connected parallel cable-driven modules, i.e., a 3-DOF shoulder module, a 1-DOF elbow module, and a 3-DOF wrist module. Due to the unique arm design features such as hybrid parallel-serial structure, modular configuration, and redundant sensors, an integrated two-level self-calibration method is proposed in this work. The first level of self-calibration, termed as the central linkage mechanism calibration, is to identify the kinematics errors existed in the 7-DOF central linkage mechanism based on its self-motion capability. The second level of calibration, termed as the cable-driven module calibration, is to identify the kinematics errors existed in each of the parallel cable-driven modules based on its sensing redundancy. To simplify the formulation of the calibration algorithms, the error model of the serial central linkage mechanism is derived from its forward kinematics, in which the Products-Of-Exponential (POE) formula is employed, while the error models of the parallel cable-driven modules are derived from their inverse kinematics. The simulation and experimental results have shown that the proposed self-calibration algorithms can effectively improve the accuracy of the 7-DOF cable-driven humanoid arm. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Fault Detection by Labeled Petri Nets in Centralized and Distributed Approaches

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 392 - 404
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4060 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper addresses the problem of online fault detection and diagnosis in discrete event systems modeled by labeled Petri nets and using Integer Linear Programming Problem (ILPP) solutions. In particular, unobservable (silent) transitions model faults and both observable and unobservable transitions model the nominal system behavior. Furthermore, observable transitions exhibit a kind of non determinism since several different transitions may share the same event label. This paper proposes two diagnosers that work in two different system settings. The first one is a centralized fault detection strategy: the diagnoser waits for an observable event and an algorithm defines and solves some ILPPs to decide whether the system behavior is normal or may exhibit some faults. In the second setting, the system consists of a set of interacting PN modules and each module is monitored by a diagnoser that has local information on the module structure. Moreover, each diagnoser observes and detects the faults of the module it is attached to and shares information in some of its places that are shared with other modules of the system. Some case studies show the two different approaches and point out the peculiarities of the proposed strategies. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Performance Metrics of Speed and Separation Monitoring in Shared Workspaces

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 405 - 414
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1581 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A set of metrics is proposed that evaluates speed and separation monitoring efficacy in industrial robot environments in terms of the quantification of safety and the effects on productivity. The collision potential is represented by separation metrics and sensor uncertainty based on perceived noise and bounding region radii. In the event of a bounding region collision between a robot and an obstacle during algorithm evaluation, the severity of the separation failure is reported as a percentage of volume penetration. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Hybrid Analysis in the Latent Nestling Method Applied to Fault Diagnosis

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 415 - 430
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4777 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the Latent Nestling Method (LNM) formalization in hybrid systems. For the proposed LNM, it is necessary to include places of continuous or differential character, allowing the analysis of continuous dynamical variable. This paper is a continuation of our previous papers , . Here, the LNM is exploited to analyze the extension to hybrid systems. One of the contributions of this work is a practical application of the LNM in hybrid systems. The case study is the Lubrication and Cooling system of a Wind Turbine Gearbox. The model of the system is built using colored Petri nets formalism and the classic techniques of continuous and hybrid Petri nets. Simulation results are presented to validate some key concepts of the formalization in hybrid systems. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Functional and Behavior Models for the Supervision of an Intelligent and Autonomous System

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 431 - 445
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2772 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The graphical approaches often have different backgrounds and view a system or an algebraic model from different perspectives in order to facilitate the communication and the understanding. These graphical approaches satisfy the modeling needs and give a clear and easily understandable overview of the behavioral and functional models and make easier to see what the process is, which vulnerabilities and asset that are involved and how the system works. The main goal of this paper is to develop and implement a methodology which combines the functional analysis and the bond graph (BG) tool for intelligent and autonomous systems. As a result, a supervisory interface is obtained, given under a finite automaton, displaying to the operators the possibilities the system has to achieve or not, its objectives. Each operating mode, corresponding to a vertex of the automaton, is associated with a set of services from a functional point-of-view and is defined accurately by a behavioral BG model. Furthermore, the service availability (associated to the BG elements) and the conditions for switching from one mode to another one are analyzed by fault detection and isolation algorithms generated on the basis of the structural and causal properties of the BG tool. Moreover, when a fault is not completely isolable some results can nevertheless be expressed in terms of available or unavailable services. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Optimal Alarm Signal Processing: Filter Design and Performance Analysis

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 446 - 451
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (920 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Accuracy and efficiency of alarm systems are of paramount importance in safe operations of industrial processes. Accuracy is measured by false and missed alarm rates (probabilities); while efficiency relates to the detection delay and complexity of the technique used. Moving average filters are often employed in industry for improved alarm accuracy. Can one do better than moving average filters? The following two problems are studied in this paper: First, given both normal and abnormal statistic distributions, how to design an optimal alarm filter (of fixed complexity) for best alarm accuracy, minimizing a weighted sum of false and missed alarm rates? Second, in what cases are moving average filters optimal? For the first problem, design of optimal linear FIR alarm filters is studied, and a numerical optimization based procedure is proposed. For the second problem, a sufficient condition is given under which the moving average filters are optimal. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Similarity Analysis of Industrial Alarm Flood Data

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 452 - 457
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (889 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Flooding of alarms is a very crucial problem in process industries. An alarm flood makes an operator ineffective of taking necessary actions, and often risking an emergency shutdown or a major upset. In this work, the flooding of alarms is discussed based on the standards presented in ISA 18.2. A new analysis method is proposed to investigate similar alarm floods from the historic alarm data and group them on the basis of the patterns of alarm occurrences. A case study on real industrial alarm data is also presented to demonstrate the utility of the proposed analysis. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Online Sensor Activation for Detectability of Discrete Event Systems

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 457 - 461
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (789 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we investigate online sensor activation to ensure detectability of discrete event systems. Detectability requires that states of a system can be determined or certain pairs of states can be distinguished by an external observer eventually or periodically. Since minimal sensor activation policies for detectability may not exist, two new concepts are introduced: 1) k-step distinguishability is introduced for strong detectability and 2) information-preserving is introduced for strong periodic detectability. The online sensor activation is then proposed and is based on the best state estimate available at the time of decision making. Three algorithms are developed for online sensor activation. The first two algorithms are for strong detectability. They minimize sensor activation while preserving k -step distinguishability. The third algorithm deals with strong periodic detectability. It minimizes sensor activation while preserving state information. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Semi-Automated Positioning System for Contact-Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 462 - 465
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (634 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Contact mode Atomic Force Microscopy (CM-AFM) is popularly used by the biophysics community to study mechanical properties of cells cultured in petri dishes, or tissue sections fixed on microscope slides. While cells are fairly easy to locate, sampling in spatially heterogeneous tissue specimens is laborious and time-consuming at higher magnifications. Furthermore, tissue registration across multiple magnifications for AFM-based experiments is a challenging problem, suggesting the need to automate the process of AFM indentation on tissue. In this work, we have developed an image-guided micropositioning system to align the AFM probe and human breast-tissue cores in an automated manner across multiple magnifications. Our setup improves efficiency of the AFM indentation experiments considerably. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

T-ASE will publish foundational research on Automation: scientific methods and technologies that improve efficiency, productivity, quality, and reliability, specifically for methods, machines, and systems operating in structured environments over long periods, and the explicit structuring of environments.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Ken Goldberg
University of California, Berkeley