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Nanotechnology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date March 2013

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • Table on contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • Masthead

    Page(s): 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Supporting and driving innovation [The Editor's Desk]

    Page(s): 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Video Rate Atomic Force Microscopy: Use of compressive scanning for nanoscale video imaging

    Page(s): 4 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1965 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a powerful instrument for studying and exploring the nanoworld [1]. AFM can obtain ultrahigh-resolution images at the subnanoscale level. However, AFM has a very significant drawback of slow imaging speed, which is due to its working principle. A conventional AFM conducts a raster scan of an entire area to generate a topography image. Therefore, the frame rate is low, making it impossible for observation of biological and physical processes that are dynamic in nature with a lifespan of a few minutes or even seconds, such as the structural change of cells, carbon nanotube shape change, and so forth [2]?[5]. In addition, for AFM-based nanomanipulations and nanomeasurement, the low frame rate makes it difficult to achieve a real-time visual guide manipulation [6], [7]. Operators usually have to wait for finishing imaging to visualize the manipulating results. Therefore, there is an increasing demand on a fast-imaging AFM system that can capture a continuous phenomenon occurring in seconds. View full abstract»

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  • Nanotechnology Public Funding and Impact Analysis: A Tale of Two Decades (1991-2010)

    Page(s): 9 - 14
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    Nanotechnology's economic and societal benefits have continued to attract significant research and development (R&D) attention from governments and industries worldwide. Over the past two decades, nanotechnology has seen quasi-exponential growth in the numbers of scientific papers and patent publications produced. New research topics and application areas are continually emerging, and investment from government, industry, and academia [1], [2] has expanded at substantial levels. But what is the impact of public funding on nanotechnology? How important is its role in driving innovation, invention, and knowledge transfer? View full abstract»

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  • Communicating Novel Computational State Variables: Post-CMOS Logic

    Page(s): 15 - 23
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    The semiconducting material silicon forms the heart of the current complimentary metal?oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Over the last four decades, the productivity of silicon technology has increased by a factor of more than a billion [1]. This growth in silicon technology was made possible by a steady reduction in the feature size, which helps pack more functionality per cost in a microprocessor. Today, the silicon-based semiconductor industry is an approximately US$270 billion market [1]. This exponential growth of the semiconductor industry was first observed by Dr. Gordon Moore. In 1965, Moore observed that the computing power of a microprocessor doubled every 18?24 months, and this observation later became known as Moore?s law [2]. In essence, Moore?s law is an economic law that serves to guide long-term planning and to set targets for research and development in the semiconductor industry. However, quantum-mechanical laws dictate that there are fundamental challenges associated with scaling on-chip components to below 10 nm [3]. A revolutionary innovation in semiconductor technology would be needed to sustain Moore?s law for advanced technology nodes below 10 nm [1], [4]. We examine performance trends of on-chip devices and interconnects upon dimensional scaling. This is followed by a discussion on emerging technologies and the repercussions of interconnects for these novel technologies. View full abstract»

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  • Advancing Electronic Packaging Using Microsolder Balls: Making 25-nm Pitch Interconnection Possible

    Page(s): 24 - 30
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    Electronic packaging technology has advanced in the direction of integrating diverse components into one package to satisfy market demands for multifunctionality as well as portability. For this reason, various packaging structures have been introduced, such as multichip modules, package on package, package in package, and eventually three-dimensional (3-D)-chip stacks. All of these approaches require increased input/output (I/O) counts, resulting in fine-pitch assembly. Therefore, the most critical issue in current electronic packaging is how to assemble fine-pitch components while avoiding an electrical short circuit in the x-y direction. Much research has been done on fine-pitch interconnecting technology using microsolder balls smaller than 200 nm, but the problems of solder-ball handling and low yield remain. In addition, there have been few reports so far about the fine-pitch interconnection below 25-nm pitch using microsolder balls. Three-dimensional-chip stacks require an additional microsolder and copper hybrid bumping and patterning processes on through silicon via (TSV), which increases the processing cost. View full abstract»

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  • Integrated microfluidic systems for molecular diagnostics: A universal electrode platform for rapid diagnosis of urinary tract infections

    Page(s): 31 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1929 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Transforming microfluidics-based biosensing systems from laboratory research into clinical reality remains an elusive goal despite decades of intensive research. A fundamental obstacle in the development of fully automated microfluidic diagnostic systems is the lack of an effective strategy for combining multiple pumping, sample preparation, and detection modules into an integrated platform. In this article, we report a universal electrode approach, which incorporates dc electrolytic pumping, ac electrokinetic sample preparation, and electrochemical sensing based on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a single microfluidic platform, to automate complicated molecular analysis procedures in nontraditional healthcare settings. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE-NANOMED 2012 [Conference Review]

    Page(s): 38
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  • Graphene Synthesis and Applications (Choi, W. and Lee, J.-W., Eds.) [Book Review]

    Page(s): 39 - 40
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