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Photovoltaics, IEEE Journal of

Issue 2 • Date April 2013

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 53
  • Table of Contents

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C1 - 598
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  • IEEE Journal of Photovoltaics publication information

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Accounting for Localized Defects in the Optoelectronic Design of Thin-Film Solar Cells

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 599 - 604
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (389 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Controlled nanostructuring of thin-film solar cells offers a promising route toward increased efficiency through improved light trapping. Many such light trapping designs involve structuring of the active region itself. Optimization of these designs is aided by the use of computer simulations that account for both the optics and electronics of the device. We describe such a simulation-based approach that accounts for experimental tradeoffs between high-aspect ratio structuring and electronic material quality. Our model explicitly accounts for localized regions of degraded material quality that is induced by light trapping structures in n-i-p a-Si:H solar cells. We find that the geometry of the defects couples to the geometry of light absorption profiles in the active region and that this coupling impacts the spectral response of the device. Our approach yields insights into the nanoscale device physics that is associated with localized geometry-induced defects and provides a framework for full optoelectronic optimization. View full abstract»

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  • Light Scattering Enhancement by Double Scattering Technique for Multijunction Thin-Film Silicon Solar Cells

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 605 - 612
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    Light trapping is an important technique to increase the efficiency of thin-film silicon solar cells. Textured surfaces are known to scatter sunlight while it passes through thin-film solar cells, thereby increasing the optical pathlength and, thus, the photon absorption in the devices. In this paper, microtextured glass superstrates were prepared by the aluminum-induced texturization (AIT) method. These superstrates achieve high transmission haze values of up to 60% while maintaining a high total optical transmission. We demonstrate that both the surface structure and the roughness of the textured glass surface can be controllably adjusted by changing the AIT process parameters. Approximately 900-nm-thick aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films are deposited onto the microtextured glass surfaces by magnetron sputtering and then further textured using wet-chemical etching in diluted HCl, creating an AZO surface that features both micrometer-scale and submicron-scale structures. Optical spectroscopy and goniophotometer measurements reveal that the light scattering capability of the substrates increases significantly due to the wet-chemical AZO texturization. The combination of microtextured AIT glass, together with the submicron-textured AZO, could be very attractive for high-efficiency double-junction micromorph thin-film Si solar cells, whereby the amorphous Si top cell benefits significantly from the AZO's submicron texture and the microcrystalline Si bottom cell benefits primarily from the microtextured glass surface. View full abstract»

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  • Recombination and Optical Properties of Wet Chemically Polished Thermal Oxide Passivated Si Surfaces

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 613 - 620
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (570 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Silicon solar cells typically feature textured surfaces on the front side to increase light absorption. An unwanted side effect of the texture is an increase in surface recombination compared with smoother surfaces. On the rear side of the solar cell, light absorption is not an issue; therefore, planar surfaces are used to decrease surface recombination. In processing, a planar surface can be achieved by wet chemical single-side etching of previously textured surfaces, resulting in a smoothed rear surface. This study investigates surface passivation of these chemically polished surfaces in dependence on the degree of smoothness. Surface passivation is achieved by thin thermally grown silicon oxides. Special focus is set on injection dependence and the influence of postmetallization annealing. Measured optical properties of different surfaces are compared with different optical simulation models. Finally, recombination and optical properties are connected to solar cell performance of fabricated passivated emitter and rear cells. View full abstract»

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  • Benefit of Selective Emitters for p-Type Silicon Solar Cells With Passivated Surfaces

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 621 - 627
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    We compare homogeneous and selective emitters on monocrystalline silicon solar cells with passivated surfaces and present an analysis of the saturation current densities influencing the open-circuit voltage VOC and the fill factor FF . The cells' surfaces are passivated by a thin thermal oxide. Selective emitters are fabricated by laser doping from phosphosilicate glass. On both Czochralski-grown silicon (Cz-Si) as well as float zone silicon (FZ-Si), we find higher conversion efficiencies for the cells featuring a selective emitter. An efficiency up to 20.0% is reported on FZ-Si with an area of 148.4 cm2 . For the selective emitter cells, 8 mV higher open-circuit voltages are found compared with the baseline. A saturation current analysis reveals that these cells exhibit a lower diode saturation current density of ideality 2 (J02), as well as improved shielding of the minorities in the emitter from the front contact. The selective emitter cells show a minor loss in short-circuit current density JSC of 0.5 %rel due to the presence of highly doped, illuminated areas. Front contact quality of the cells featuring a selective emitter is found to be superior compared with the cells with a homogeneously doped emitter. View full abstract»

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  • Industrial PERL-Type Si Solar Cells With Efficiencies Exceeding 19.5%

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 628 - 634
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (589 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we describe a path toward industrial passivated emitter, rear locally diffused (PERL)-type crystalline Si solar cells with efficiencies exceeding 19.5%. The impact of thickness and quality of different local back surface field (BSF) pastes on the extended laser ablation (ELA) rear contacting technique is investigated, and the effect of the wafer resistivity and emitter diffusion/oxidation processes on cell performance is evaluated. Based on these investigations, an optimized process flow for PERL-type monocrystalline Si solar cells is defined, and its capability is tested against that of standard Al-BSF in large batch experiments, demonstrating a top efficiency of 19.7%, a 19.5% average efficiency, and an efficiency increase of about 1% abs. with respect to Al-BSF cells. View full abstract»

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  • The Impact of Different Diffusion Temperature Profiles on Iron Concentrations and Carrier Lifetimes in Multicrystalline Silicon Wafers

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 635 - 640
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (789 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this study, we investigate the influence of different diffusion temperature profiles on the interstitial iron concentration before and after contact firing. It is shown that the positive influence of a low-temperature anneal after phosphorus diffusion is strongly reduced after contact firing as the formed precipitates dissolve again. On the other hand, a dissolution peak before the diffusion aims on a decrease in precipitate density and, therefore, leads to a reduced interstitial iron concentration especially after firing. The physical mechanisms during diffusion and firing are investigated with Sentaurus Process simulations. Furthermore, lifetime improvements in standard multicrystalline material could be achieved applying the dissolution peak before diffusion. View full abstract»

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  • Investigation of the Internal Back Reflectance of Rear-Side Dielectric Stacks for c-Si Solar Cells

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 641 - 648
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (946 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper addresses the calculation of internal back reflectance for various dielectrics that are used in rear-side passivated crystalline silicon solar cells. Optical modeling of various stack configurations is examined to explore the back-surface reflectance at the Si-dielectric interface for different film combinations and thicknesses as a function of wavelength and internal angle of incidence at the rear side. Specifically, configurations using aluminum oxide (AlOx), silicon nitride (SiNx), titanium dioxide (TiO2), and silicon dioxide (SiO2) were investigated with a focus on designing stack configurations that will also allow for high-quality passivation and are compatible with a high-volume manufacturing environment. In addition, samples were fabricated by plasma-enhanced and atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of thin dielectric films onto polished and textured monocrystalline silicon wafers. Spectral reflectance curves of the samples are presented to supplement and validate the conclusions that are obtained from the optical modeling data. View full abstract»

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  • Applications of Photoluminescence Imaging to Dopant and Carrier Concentration Measurements of Silicon Wafers

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 649 - 655
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (904 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Photoluminescence-based imaging is most commonly used to measure the excess minority carrier density and its corresponding lifetime. By using appropriate surface treatments, this high-resolution imaging technique can also be used for majority carrier concentration determination. The mechanism involves effectively pinning the minority excess carrier density, resulting in a dependence of the photoluminescence intensity on only the majority carrier density. Three suitable surface preparation methods are introduced in this paper: aluminum sputtering, deionized water etching, and mechanical abrasion. Spatially resolved dopant density images determined using this technique are consistent with the images obtained by a well-established technique based on free carrier infrared emission. Three applications of the technique are also presented in this paper, which include imaging of oxygen-related thermal donors, radial dopant density analysis, and the study of donor-related recombination active defects. These applications demonstrate the usefulness of the technique in characterizing silicon materials for photovoltaics. View full abstract»

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  • Direct Laser Texturing for High-Efficiency Silicon Solar Cells

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 656 - 661
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (708 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We implement direct laser texturing (DiLaT) into small-area (2 × 2 cm 2) passivated emitter and rear solar cells (PERC). On monocrystalline float-zone silicon (FZ-Si) wafers, we achieve an independently confirmed energy conversion efficiency of 19.9% that demonstrates the applicability of DiLaT to high-efficiency solar cells. Applying our DiLaT process to block-cast multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers, we achieve short-circuit current densities Jsc up to 39.3 mA/cm2 and efficiencies up to 17.9%. The reduced Jsc value of our mc-Si solar cells compared with the FZ-Si cells is shown to be predominantly due to increased recombination in the bulk and/or the rear. View full abstract»

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  • Modeling the Cost and Minimum Sustainable Price of Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Manufacturing in the United States

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 662 - 668
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2746 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We extend our cost model to assess minimum sustainable prices of crystalline silicon wafer, cell, and module manufacturing in the United States. We investigate the cost and price structures of current multicrystalline silicon technology and consider the introduction of line-of-sight innovations currently on the industry roadmap, as well as advanced technologies currently at an earlier stage of development. We benchmark the capability of these concepts to reach the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot module price target and perform a sensitivity analysis to determine high-impact research domains that have the greatest impact on price. This exercise highlights advanced c-Si manufacturing concepts with significant cost reduction potential and provides insight into strategies that could greatly reduce module prices in a financially sustainable manner. View full abstract»

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  • Etching Paste for Innovative Solar-Cell Applications

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 669 - 673
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (686 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper reports the development of an etching paste for selective etching of a phosphor silicate glass (PSG) layer, which is used as a mask for the processing of solar cells. The etching paste should thoroughly open a thick PSG layer that has high oxygen content in 2 minutes. Moreover, the paste must be completely water based and etch the PSG layer at room temperature without damaging the silicon surface. One of the applications for this kind of etching paste is making solar cells with a selective emitter structure. In this study, a selective structure with a double-diffusion process is considered. The first PSG layer is created by adding oxygen and POCl3 gases into the diffusion furnace. By using the ETCH-TEC .Ox etching paste, this oxide-rich PSG layer is locally opened, and the second diffusion without oxygen is carried out. Light and heavy phosphorous doping of silicon leads to locally doped areas with sheet resistances of 100 and 50 Ω/square, respectively. The opened structures were characterized microscopically and physically. An experiment with 800 wafers in a solar-cell production line of the company MAGI Solar was carried out. Compared with the wafers with a homogeneous emitter, an average increase of +0.52% in absolute efficiency was measured. View full abstract»

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  • Bifacial n-Type Cells With >20% Front-Side Efficiency for Industrial Production

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 674 - 677
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (397 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present our progress in the development of monocrystalline n-type cell for industrial manufacturing. Our cell uses a homogeneous boron front-side emitter and a phosphorous back-surface field, which are contacted with screen-printed grids on both sides of the cell. Our current process allows the stable manufacturing of 156 × 156 mm2 cells with a front-side efficiency of around 20% on industrial equipment. Besides the inherent immunity to light induced degradation of the n-type substrate, this cell type offers the opportunity to significantly enhance the energy yield by the employment of a bifacial module technology. First field tests indicate the potential of more than 10% additional current gain, challenging the energy yield ofmore complex monofacial cells of even higher efficiency. View full abstract»

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  • Surface Passivation of Boron-Diffused p-Type Silicon Surfaces With (1 0 0) and (1 1 1) Orientations by ALD Al _{2} O _{3} Layers

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 678 - 683
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3387 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Boron-diffused p+/n/p+ and undiffused silicon samples with (1 0 0) and (1 1 1) orientations passivated by aluminum oxide (Al2O3) that is synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been investigated. Emitter saturation current densities of ~24, 29, and 33 fA/cm2 were obtained for (1 0 0) samples with symmetrical 85Ω/□ B diffusions that were passivated by plasma-assisted, H2O-based, and O3-based ALD Al2O3, respectively. Compared with undiffused samples, it was found that the additional surface doping from the diffusion reduces recombination at the Al2O3/Si interface in the case of relatively low surface boron concentrations (<; 2×1019 cm-3). The degree of surface passivation that is observed on (1 0 0) surfaces was generally better than on (1 1 1) surfaces, particularly for undiffused samples, but this difference effectively disappeared following the application of more negative charge by corona charging. From capacitance- voltage measurements, it was found that Al2O3 films on substrates with a (1 0 0) orientation display a higher negative fixed charge density Qf than films on (1 1 1) samples. On the other hand, the interface state density Dit was not strongly influenced by surface orientation of the substrate. It appears that the difference in negative charge density is at least partly responsible for the differences in the observed passivation. View full abstract»

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  • 18% Efficiency IBC Cell With Rear-Surface Processed on Quartz

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 684 - 689
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (575 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In order to relax the mechanical constraints of processing thin crystalline Si wafers into highly efficient solar cells, we propose a process sequence, where a significant part of the process is done on module level. The device structure is an interdigitated-back-contact cell with an amorphous silicon back surface field. The record cell reaches an independently confirmed efficiency of 18.4%. Although the device deserves further optimization, the result shows the compatibility of processing on glass with efficiencies exceeding 18%, which opens the door to a high-efficiency solar cell process where the potentially thin wafer is attached to a foreign carrier during the full processing sequence. View full abstract»

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  • Investigation of Screen-Printed Rear Contacts for Aluminum Local Back Surface Field Silicon Wafer Solar Cells

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 690 - 696
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (715 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Silicon wafer solar cells with an aluminum local back surface field (Al-LBSF) are currently intensively investigated for industrial application. One of the main challenges for the Al-LBSF solar cell is the formation of the local Al rear contacts. In our previous work, we have introduced the relative photoluminescence (PL) intensity method to study the Al-Si local contact formation. In this study, we apply this method to experimentally investigate the impact of the geometry (lines or points) of the rear contacts and compare the experimental results with theoretical results that are obtained using Fischer's model. We find that the PL intensity strongly correlates with the p+ layer thickness and inversely correlates with the void density at the rear surface. Al-LBSF solar cells with different rear contact geometries are fabricated. High Rs was found, especially for those cells with narrower line widths and a large number of voids. View full abstract»

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  • 19.6% Cast Mono-MWT Solar Cells and 268 W Modules

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 697 - 701
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (639 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Nowadays, increasingly new technologies are adopted to improve the efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells, for example, selective emitter (SE) cells with the advantage of lower contact resistance and higher blue response and metal wrap through (MWT) cells with the advantage of lower shading area and lower series resistance losses in the module. Cast monosilicon material is also getting increasingly popular because of its higher efficiency and lower cost. In our study, combining SE with MWT technology, the maximum efficiency of cast monocells has reached up to 19.6%. Further modification with non-UV cut ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer and anti-reflection-coated glass, the maximum module power of 268 Wis achieved with 19.2% efficiency cells. View full abstract»

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  • Aluminum Evaporation and Etching for the Front-Side Metallization of Solar Cells

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 702 - 708
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (718 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we report and discuss several strategies to produce solar cell front contacts by full-area metallization and etching (FAME). Our chemically structured contacts consume less expensive silver than screen-printed contacts. As a proof of principle for the FAME approach, we present a 148.6-cm2-sized silicon solar cell that has about 100-μm-wide front-side fingers. These fingers consist of a 15-μm-thick evaporated aluminum layer, supplying the electrical conductance, and a sputtered capping stack (200 nm Ni:V plus 20 nm Ag), providing solderability. The entire metal stack is first deposited on the full area of the solar cells, then locally protected by a wax pattern, and subsequently etched with commercial Ni:V etch and NaOH. The efficiency of the best solar cell is 19.3%, the fill factor is 78%, the open-circuit voltage is 666 mV, and the short-circuit current density is 37.1 mA/cm2. View full abstract»

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  • Light-Trapping Properties of a Diffractive Honeycomb Structure in Silicon

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 709 - 715
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    Thinner solar cells will reduce material costs, but require light trapping for efficient optical absorption. We have already reported development of a method for fabrication of diffractive structures on solar cells. In this paper, we create these structures on wafers with a thickness between 21 and 115 μm, and present measurements on the light-trapping properties of these structures. These properties are compared with those of random pyramid textures, isotropic textures, and a polished sample. We divide optical loss contributions into front-surface reflectance, escape light, and parasitic absorption in the rear reflector. We find that the light-trapping performance of our diffractive structure lies between that of the planar and the random pyramid-textured reference samples. Our processing method, however, causes virtually no thinning of the wafer, is independent of crystal orientation, and does not require seeding from, e.g., saw damage, making it well suited for application to thin silicon wafers. View full abstract»

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  • Optimizing the Front Electrode of Silicon-Wafer-Based Solar Cells and Modules

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 716 - 722
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (626 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Front electrode optimization is one of the important design considerations that affects the efficiency of a silicon wafer solar cell. The optimization of the front electrode is usually done to maximize cell efficiency at standard test conditions (STC). However, with increasing prices in silver, optimization of the front electrode should be done by taking into account the cost of the silver paste. In this study, optimization of the front electrode is done at the cell level at STC (dollars per watt peak), module level at STC (dollars per watt peak), and under real-world module conditions (dollars per kilowatthour), taking into account the cost of the silver paste. For commercial screen-printed multicrystalline silicon wafer solar cells, it is found that to achieve the most cost-effective cell design at the outdoor module level (dollars per kilowatthour), the number of front metal fingers can be strongly reduced (by more than 20) compared with a conventional cell design, which is maximized for STC cell efficiency. For silver price of $1286/kg, optimization at the cell and module level for lowest cost will yield up to 1% cost savings compared with optimization for maximum efficiency. Optimization for the lowest levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) will yield on average 0.6% lower LCOE compared with optimization for maximum annual energy output. View full abstract»

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  • Macroporous Silicon Solar Cells With an Epitaxial Emitter

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 723 - 729
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1064 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we separate a macroporous silicon absorber from a monocrystalline n-type silicon wafer by means of electrochemical etching. The porosity is (31 ± 3)%. The epitaxial growth of a p +-type Si layer onto one side of the macroporous silicon substrate forms a pn-junction that covers the full outer and inner surface of the macroporous layer. Epitaxy reduces the porosity to (19 ± 2)%. The thickness of the epitaxial layer is (3.0 ± 0.2) μm on the rear side and (0.4 ± 0.1) μm on the pore walls. We process (35 ± 2)-μm-thick macroporous silicon solar cells with an aperture area of 2.25 cm2. The short-circuit current density is 37.1 mA cm-2, and the open-circuit voltage is 544 mV. A fill factor of 65.1% limits the energy-conversion efficiency to 13.1%. View full abstract»

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  • Effect of Sb on GaNAs Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 730 - 736
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (763 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a comparative study on the material properties and two-photon excitation (TPE) experiments that involve three bands between a GaNAs and a GaNAsSb absorber designed for intermediate band solar cells. The absorber layers were sandwiched between p-AlGaAs emitter layers and n-AlGaAs IB barrier layers. This permits production of above the bandgap electron-hole pairs by TPE involving two subband photons with the intermediate band as the stepping stone. A recovery in the carrier population in the intermediate band of the GaNAsSb absorber was realized due to an improved material quality. An enhancement in the photocurrent production due to TPE and an associated improvement in the open-circuit voltage were observed. View full abstract»

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  • Design of GaAs Solar Cells Operating Close to the Shockley–Queisser Limit

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 737 - 744
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (696 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    With recent advances in device design, single-junction GaAs solar cells are approaching their theoretical efficiency limits. Accurate numerical simulation may offer insights that can help close the remaining gap between the practical and theoretical limits. Significant care must be taken, however, to ensure that the simulation is self-consistent and properly comprehends thermodynamic limits. In this paper, we use rigorous photon recycling simulation coupled with carrier transport simulation to identify the dominant loss mechanisms that limit the performance of thin-film GaAs solar cells. View full abstract»

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  • Interband Cascade Photovoltaic Devices for Conversion of Mid-IR Radiation

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 745 - 752
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (576 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Interband cascade structures are investigated for applications in the photovoltaic conversion of mid-infrared radiation. We present detailed studies of the performance characteristics and the temperature dependence of seven-stage, single-bandgap devices. These cascade structure devices were able to achieve open-circuit voltages as high as 1.68 V with a cutoff wavelength of 4.0 μm at 80 K. The total power efficiency was broken down into a product of individual efficiencies in order to determine the power loss from each of the physical mechanisms that are involved in the conversion process. We find that at low temperature, the power conversion is limited by incomplete absorption of the incident light and a fill factor below 50%. At higher temperature, the drop in open-circuit voltage limits the efficiency. We comment on how the results of this efficiency analysis will steer the direction of our future efforts toward device improvement. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Journal of Photovoltaics is a peer-reviewed, archival publication reporting original and significant research results that advance the field of photovoltaics (PV).

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Timothy J. Anderson
Chemical Engineering Department
University of Florida