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Microwave Magazine, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date March-April 2013

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 29
  • Front Cover

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 3 - 4
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  • Society listing

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 4
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  • Core Values of a Professional Society [President's Column]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 6 - 10
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  • Performance reviews [MicroBusiness]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 12 - 14
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  • Rare No More? [Microwave Surfing]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 18 - 20
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  • Wireless Power Transmission - The Last Cut of Wires... [From the Guest Editors' Desk]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 22 - 24
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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  • Optimum behavior: Wireless power transmission system design through behavioral models and efficient synthesis techniques

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 26 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1602 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this article, the different challenges and open issues regarding WPT systems have been presented considering both the transmitting and receiving ends. The challenges in the receiving side include the accurate modeling of the rectifying elements, the adequate selection of the rectifier topology, and the joint optimization of antenna and rectifier circuit. The challenges in the transmitting side are mainly in the improvement of the dc-to-RF conversion efficiency and in the selection of the optimum transmitted signal waveform. The final goal of most of these challenges is to take advantage of the nonlinear nature of the rectifying elements in order to maximize the RF-to-dc conversion efficiency in the receiving end of WPT systems. View full abstract»

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  • Power in the sky: Requirements for microwave wireless power beamers for powering high-altitude platforms

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 36 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3141 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We will focus mainly on microwave beamers to provide the energy wirelessly to station-keep such platforms and for powering their payloads. Laser beamer systems are also in play but are limited by weather, beam safety, and current cost. The HAPPs are assumed to be equipped with rectennas to receive the wireless power beam and to convert it to electric power, although there are other beam-receiving power converters such as thermal absorbers. However, the rectennas are the lightest and most efficient collector-converters to date, being on the order of kW/kg and over 85% efficient and providing dc voltage output directly that can power electric motors for propulsion [4, pp. 1231]. Beamers in concept are simply transmitters and antennas, but they have very complex requirements involving and resulting from the power levels and the vehicle aerodynamics. The demonstration that provided proof that WPT could deliver electric power levels sufficient to power stratosphere vehicles with significant payloads was performed in 1975 at Goldstone in California's Mojave desert, where the author provided the engineering design specifications and conducted [13], with JPL/ Caltech and Raytheon, tests sponsored by NASA that collected 34 kW dc output from a 23.84-m2 rectenna array averaging 82.5% collection-conversion efficiency with S-Band (2.388 GHz) microwave power radiated from a 26-m diameter parabolic antenna equipped with a high-power klystron transmitter. The transmitter was located 1.55 km from the rectenna. More power could have been collected if resources had allowed a rectenna larger in area. However, this article is to concentrate on WPT beamers. View full abstract»

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  • Rectifying loose coils: Wireless power transfer in loosely coupled inductive links with lateral and angular misalignment

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 48 - 54
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1256 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article presents novel analytic solutions to the problem of predicting the power transfer efficiency between lateral and angularly misaligned solenoidal coils. Inductive coupling is extensively used as a method of wireless powering and offers significant advantages over wired powering schemes. However, coil misalignment is an inherent problem that can significantly impair the power transfer efficiency of such systems. This article describes a novel analytical derivation for the near field power transfer efficiency of loosely coupled inductive links under lateral and angular coil misalignment. The analytical power transfer expressions given show good agreement with experimental data. The advantage of this approach lies in the fact that the effect on the link efficiency of variation of a specific parameter in the model can quickly be identified. This model can predict the response of the system under misalignment conditions, with different coil geometries, and operating frequencies without the need for repeated and costly simulation runs. This allows a designer to create a model of a WPT system with a mathematical package such as Mathcad to explore “what if?” situations. The approach taken in this article can be extended to other coil geometries such a circular flat spirals and square flat spirals to obtain modified versions of (13) and (17), [18], [19]. View full abstract»

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  • Cut the Cord: Low-Power Far-Field Wireless Powering

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 55 - 62
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2445 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Although the idea of eliminating cords seems attractive, the efficiency will always be better when a wire or cable is used to deliver power. So, what are the applications that warrant wireless powering, and especially wireless powering at longer ranges? It might be appropriate to remember a quote by Rudyard Kipling in this introduction: I keep six honest serving men (they taught me all I knew) Their names are What and Why and When And How and Where and Who Let us start by answering the main questions related to wireless powering. There are essentially three types, Figure 1(a) inductive, capacitive or resonant reactive near-field coupling; (b) far-field directive power beaming; and (c) far-field nondirective power transfer. View full abstract»

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  • Batteries Not Included: A Mat-Based Wireless Power Transfer System for Implantable Medical Devices As a Moving Target

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 63 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5641 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Implantable devices have become increasingly popular in modern medicine. These devices have a wide range of applications, such as health monitoring, disease prevention, delivery of a therapeutic regimen, and biomimetic prosthesis. For example, electrical stimulation of nerve tissue and recording of neural electrical activity are the basis of emerging prostheses and treatments for spinal cord injury, stroke, sensory deficits, and neurological disorders [1]-[5]. Being able to record neural activity from awake animals with observable behavior has greatly advanced our understanding of the neural mechanisms that mediate behavior. Conventional microelectrode recording techniques typically require a percutaneous connector, which is associated with infection risks. Generally, in order to obtain stable recordings, animals must be trained to accept some degree of restraint (e.g., head fixation). Not only is the mobility of the animal subject limited, but the results obtained under such restricted conditions may not reflect the full repertoire of brain activity that occurs during natural behaviors [2]. This issue can be addressed with implantable electronics to record neural activity and wirelessly transmit this data through the skin to an external device. A wireless technique is then required to transmit both data and power, connecting the external system and the implanted devices. View full abstract»

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  • A world awash with wireless devices: Radio-frequency exposure issues

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 73 - 84
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1130 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Within the past decade, a quiet revolution has occurred in consumer electronics, with a massive shift toward wireless connectivity in household devices. While these open up new possibilities for consumers, the possible harms associated with wireless and Internet technologies-for example, privacy and security issues-have prompted widespread concern among consumers and experts alike. Also, in the public arena, there has been widespread concern about possible health effects of exposure to radio-frequency (RF) energy emitted by wireless-enabled devices, in particular around use of Wi-Fi in schools and wireless-enabled electric utility meters, known as “smartmeters,” in residences. While the RF exposures from such devices are far below U.S. and international safety limits, some aspects of the exposures (their involuntary nature or perhaps the novelty of the technologies) have been particularly troubling to the public. Consequently, political leaders have called for studies on possible health effects of wireless technology. View full abstract»

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  • Wideband radio frequency measurements: From instrumentation to sampling theory

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 85 - 98
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2467 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Whether listening to broadcast radio or testing developed wireless devices, for civilian or military applications, based on terrestrial or spatial links, a radio frequency (RF) receiver with good measurement capabilities that preserves the received signal information is required. Today's RF measurement receivers with wideband capabilities are split into two groups based on the measurement strategy they adopt. Both groups produce a time domain waveform with both amplitude and phase information that is constructed either from a transformation of its frequency contents or directly from its time-domain samples. View full abstract»

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  • Powerful applications of electromagnetic field simulators: Field visualization for education

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 99 - 105
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2856 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Electromagnetic simulators are essential tools for the design of complex microwave and RF systems. They are also extremely useful for educational purposes. One of their main advantages is the possibility to visualize the electromagnetic fields in any structure. Through this visualization, we can help the students comprehend the mathematical and physical concept involved and provide them with an easily understandable image of the field distribution inside any structure. Commercially available electromagnetic simulators [High Frequency Simulation Software (HFSS), Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio (CST), Sonnet electromagnetic field solver, etc.] allow us to pass from the somewhat obscure mathematical representation of the electromagnetic field theory, i.e., Maxwell's equations, to accurate images and animations. By understanding the modeling properties of the simulators, students can explore more details of complex structures [1]. View full abstract»

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  • Fast and Accurate Simulation of Novel Millimeter-Wave Circuits Based on Commercial Software Package

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 106 - 111
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1870 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The accuracy of an Eigenmode analysis for characterizing the propagation and attenuation behavior of periodic structures has been theoretically verified in [1] and [2]. When combined with full-wave simulation, one can further completely and efficiently solve periodic multimode structures and devices. In this work, a set of virtual experiments is conducted to highlight the efficiency and versatility of both solvers in characterizing a set of basic microwave devices. This was demonstrated during the IMS2012 Student Design Competition. On the other hand, the quest to bridge the gap between optical and microwave frequencies has resulted in an unprecedented growth in millimeter-wave frequencies applications. This growth is paralleled by an increase in the complexity of circuit design, owed in part to the miniaturization and high-density integration that is typical of millimeter-wave frequency circuits. This complexity necessitates the concurrent use of diverse modeling and simulation techniques to enhance the accuracy of circuit characterization. View full abstract»

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  • Real networks (review of "hands-on networking: from theory to practice"; merani, m.l., et al;2009)[book/software reviews]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 112 - 118
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  • 2012 Gathering of Region 8 MTT-S Chapter Representatives in Amsterdam [Around the Globe]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 114 - 118
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  • ¿¿¿2013 IEEE Compound Semiconductor IC Symposium

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 116
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  • 2013 IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 120 - 121
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  • [MTT-S Ombuds Officer]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 122 - 124
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  • Microwave New Products [New Products]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 126 - 130
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  • Call for Nominations for Election to the MTT-S Administrative Committee

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 128
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  • IMOC2013

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 129
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  • Pearls Before Swine [cartoon]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 130
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Microwave Magazine is intended to serve primarily as a source of information of interest to professionals in the field of microwave theory and techniques.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Alfy Riddle
M/A-COM Technology Solutions
microwave.editor@ieee.org

408-506-0972