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IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 1985

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): c1
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  • Inside front cover

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): c2
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  • Preface

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 1
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (76 KB)

    OUR SPECIAL section, “Writing for Disadvantaged Readers,” is unusual and unusually pertinent for engineers. As Andrew Malcolm notes in his “Introduction,” many of the engineers in this country are not native born speakers of English and many readers of technical writing may have handicaps which impinge on their understanding of material. Surprisingly, the techniques tha... View full abstract»

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  • Writing for the disadvantaged reader: An introduction

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):1 - 2
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (148 KB)

    Electrical engineers usually write for two classes of readers: other engineers and the general public. Within both of these groups there are disadvantaged readers. Often, fellow engineers are natives of countries where they learned a language other than English as their first language, and who in some cases have not mastered English. A recent issue of The Institute discussed the large number of no... View full abstract»

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  • Writing for adult English language learners

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):3 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (599 KB)

    The reading needs of those who have not yet achieved proficiency-language learners, such as adults with normal hearing learning English as a second language and deaf adults-differ from the needs of fluent readers. The author explains how writers can use specific strategies to alleviate the difficulties these readers experience. View full abstract»

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  • Evaluating readability

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):11 - 14
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (303 KB)

    Readability formulas have drawbacks when used with persons who are not fluent in English. Most such formulas depend upon the assumptions that longer words and longer sentences are more difficult than those which are not. The author asserts that these assumptions do not hold, and that there are other factors which contribute to relative difficulty when dealing with nonfluent readers. Vocabulary, se... View full abstract»

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  • Writing for closed-captioned television for the hearing-impaired

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):15 - 18
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (279 KB)

    The National Captioning Institute (NCI), a public corporation created by Congress, provides captions on commercial and public television, cable and home video for the hearing-impaired. NCI is supported jointly by major television networks, syndicators and cable companies and receives appropriations from Congress and the private sector. Captions are broadcast in code digital form so that the genera... View full abstract»

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  • How closed captions work

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):19 - 20
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (118 KB)

    The author describes the coding of closed captions for the hearing impaired, which are included in standard television broadcast signals on line 21 of the standard television broadcast signal. Decoders in adaptors or in special television receivers decode these signals and display the captions on television screens. View full abstract»

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  • Estimating the vocabulary size of the disadvantaged reader

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):21 - 25
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (367 KB)

    Assessing the vocabulary range of the audience for an engineering document is not an easy task and is even more difficult when the audience includes disadvantages readers. This report supports the hypothesis that the less often a word appears in print, the less likely it is to be known by a reader. A test was given to 277 hearing students ranging in age from 9 through 14 and to 438 hearing-impaire... View full abstract»

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  • The impact of passive voice on reading comprehension

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):26 - 27
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (161 KB)

    Many classes of disadvantaged readers fail to correctly comprehend agentless passive voice sentences. Students in a physics class at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf were given the Test of Syntactic Abilities to ascertain whether they could comprehend the passive voice structures commonly found in technical texts and reports. The results showed that 50% of these prelingually deaf coll... View full abstract»

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  • What's in an Arabic name?

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):28 - 29
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    The elements of Arabic names are analyzed. Difficulties and confusion in translation are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Do not grind armadillo armor in this mill

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):30 - 37
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (586 KB)

    Some instructions for a coffee mill fail to take the reader's common sense seriously and so violate some basic rules for communication, called speech act rule. When the instructions violate the rules, the reader either gets confused or feels justified to stop reading. By writing the instructions this way, the company tried to protect itself from lawsuits. It is shown that these instructions do not... View full abstract»

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  • A team approach to producing good documentation

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):38 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (301 KB)

    A successful way of organizing a large publications group is described. Included are descriptions of the roles of planners, writers, editors, editorial assistants, illustrators, and managers. When these specialists work together as a team, good documentation can be produced more easily. View full abstract»

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  • The seven components of clarity in technical writing

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):42 - 46
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    The author proposes an encompassing concept of clarity, a ubiquitous, yet undefined, concept in technical writing and editing. Clarity, a function of the target audience is analyzed according to its seven components: brevity, accuracy, completeness order, emphasis, consistency, and objectivity. View full abstract»

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  • Book reviews: How to complete and survive a doctoral dissertation

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 47
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  • Designing usable texts

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):47 - 49
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  • Call for papers

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):50 - 51
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  • 1986–1987 Congressional fellowships

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 52
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  • 1985 Index IEEE transactions on professional communication vol. PC-28

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):1 - 4
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  • [Back inside cover]

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): c3
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  • [Blank page - back cover]

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to applied research on professional communication--including but not limited to technical and business communication. It has been published since 1957 by the Professional Communication Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
George F. Hayhoe
Mercer University School of Eng.