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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 1981

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 1
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  • Copyright page

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 1
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  • About this issue

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 1
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    Three “hot topics” in the management of Research, Development, and Engineering (RD&E) are the focii of the papers in this issue. All three, on a general level, concern the vitality of technology groups (R&D, engineering, product development) in a company and their ability to mount and sustain effective innovation and routine technology operations. Parden deals with the turnover that is endemic in the electronics industry and is, in some sectors and geographical regions, becoming worse. To some extent, this appears to be a simple matter of supply and demand too many jobs chasing too few qualified people. On closer examination, however, it is much more complex. Although many of the engineers and scientists involved in job changing or its extreme form job hopping do appear to be getting more money as they move from one company to another, many other factors are at work in motivating and facilitating or forcing their job mobility. Parden's paper explores some of these other factors, related to organizational environment and individual career aspirations, through a brief survey. Other investigators are attempting to probe more deeply into both these global factors and trying to find “root causes” or, at least, significant contributing cause s. One of the tracks being followed is related to career and personal expectations which have been raised among some students and professionals in the RD&E community about their worth as people, and organization members, and contributors to their technical fields, as compared to “workers filling a slot.” In our own studies of the “recruiting” problem in the exploding computer science field, we find many disappointments and unrealistic expectations contributing to the churning of people in the field, leading to either high turnover of key people, or perhaps worse, resignation of not-so-key people to staying but not giving as much of themselves as - hey might. All RD&E organizations cannot provide “optimum” conditions for all levels of their staff, but it is clear that many such organizations are not trying very hard to find out the causes of turnover (and underlying dissatisfaction). View full abstract»

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  • The manager's role and the high mobility of technical specialists in the Santa Clara Valley

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 2 - 8
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    One hundred locally employed engineers, programmers, and scientists enrolled in engineering management courses at Santa Clara, responded to a survey asking why technical specialists are frequently changing jobs. While escalating salaries trigger the change, the reasons advanced for staying with an organization, or the improved conditions sought by changing jobs, is of interest to those managers who wish to retain their key people, and of equal interest to those managers who seek to spirit people to their own organizations. View full abstract»

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  • Effects of release-time on R&D outputs and scientists' gratification

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 8 - 12
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    A release-time policy which permitted scientists to periodically work on their own ideas was implemented on an experimental basis at a market oriented R&D laboratory. Only a small percentage of the laboratory personnel took advantage of the new policy. These few participants quickly became disillusioned, and their attitudes spread among the remaining nonparticipants. Reasons for the apparent failure of release-time in this situation are cited, and several general pitfalls to be avoided in administering release-time are enumerated. The compelling conclusion is advanced that the seemingly innocuous idea of letting scientists work on their own ideas is an extremely complex and difficult concept to successfully implement. View full abstract»

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  • Evaluation method for engineering activity — One example in Japan

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 13 - 16
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    In a company manufacturing a variety of products, it is necessary for its technology staff on the corporate levels to evaluate the engineering activity of each business unit. A certain general electrical manufacturer in Japan is taken as an example and one example of an evaluation method is introduced. This method is based on comparison with other main rival companies and has the advantage of permitting a judgement convincing all people relating each business. Based upon the evaluation data thus obtained, top management and corporate staff can map out adequate technical policy and give advice for directives to each business unit. View full abstract»

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  • 1981 IEEE engineering management conference

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 17
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  • Call for papers

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 18
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  • The International journal of creativity and new product development planned innovation

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 19
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  • About the authors

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 20
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  • 1981 Index: IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management: Vol. EM-28

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 1 - 2
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Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas