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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 1973

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1973 , Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Copyright page

    Publication Year: 1973 , Page(s): 1
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  • About this issue

    Publication Year: 1973 , Page(s): 1
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    AFTER last issue's “orgy” of mathematical, systems, and operations research-type papers, we had hoped that the current issue would restore the balance between such approaches and the behavioral or management-type articles. Several of the papers are, in fact, in the latter category. Authors of two of the six papers are in industry. However, there is still strong emphasis on more analytical attempts to understand and improve the Research, Development, and Engineering (RD&E) process. From the viewpoints of a highly technical professional society (IEEE) and the people attempting to improve the RD&E process from inside and from outside, this is not a bad situation. Although hunches, insights, and stimulation may result from general discussion papers on problems of managing RD&E, significant improvement in the art will require a much stronger analytical base than now exists. View full abstract»

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  • The use of dynamic programming techniques for determining resource allocations among R/D projects: An example

    Publication Year: 1973 , Page(s): 2 - 5
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    An example of the use of dynamic programming for R/D resource allocation in the aerospace industry is described. Procedures for developing the required input data are described, and a quantitative comparison is made of the effectiveness of resource allocation by dynamic programming vis-a-vis a conventional method. It is shown that dynamic programming can result in significant improvements in program effectiveness. View full abstract»

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  • Performance control in government R&D projects: The measurable effects of performing required management and engineering techniques

    Publication Year: 1973 , Page(s): 6 - 14
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    A large number and variety of management and engineering techniques (such as PERT, value engineering, and configuration management) have been implemented over the past decade to improve the technical, cost, and schedule performance of government-sponsored R&D projects. However, such R&D efforts continue to be plagued with technical, schedule, and cost difficulties. The intent of the research reported here was to determine if the required performance of management and engineering techniques resulted in a measurable difference in project technical, schedule, and cost performance. The study utilized performance and control data collected from 108 government-sponsored R&D projects which occurred in the 1950-1967 time period. The major findings of the study were 1) the application of a large volume and variety of management control techniques to R&D projects could not be statistically associated with levels of project technical, schedule, and cost difficulties that were lower than was encountered in projects not having such control; and 2) the application of a large volume and variety of management control techniques to R&D projects tends to be associated with greater numbers of technical, schedule, and cost failures than were associated with projects not having such control. View full abstract»

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  • A cost relevance tree procedure for allocating development expenditure

    Publication Year: 1973 , Page(s): 14 - 22
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    A new quantitative systematic procedure, called a cost relevance tree, for group objective evaluation of development projects for their eventual cost-reduction effectiveness in a given segment of a business is described. The procedure is applied to the construction, repair, and rearrangement of Bell System underground (conduit) plant. This systematic procedure quantifies recent and applicable costs, projects these costs into the future, and finally provides a format of development project program rankings where future underground plant innovations can be identified and evaluated. This procedure is an extension of Honeywell's PATTERN technique attempting to add some economic dimension without undue complexity to the relative value of development projects. While similar to the Delphi method in the use of expert evaluation, attempts to achieve its controlled, but time-consuming, independent thinking were not made. Resultant data deficiencies plus a lack of benefit-cost analysis and the uncertainties of future projections are compensated by a sensitivity analysis. This analysis also shows the effect of input data uncertainty on project ranking. View full abstract»

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  • A dynamic model of some multistage aspects of research and development portfolios

    Publication Year: 1973 , Page(s): 22 - 29
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    Many models of research and development (R&D) projects do not consider the intermediate outcomes and decisions that may be foreseen to arise during their evolution through the technical and commercial stages. Consideration of the sequential aspects of allocating scarce resources to a set of projects may make a great difference to the solution of the problem in terms of the optimum subset of projects to work on in the immediate future. The solution of this problem is important to R&D management. An approach is described based on the application of a stochastic linear-programming formulation to a portfolio of projects, each planned using a form of the decision-tree structure called a `project tree.' A series of elementary examples are presented as a means of gaining insight into the method. The general formulation is then presented in detail and applied to a small problem. View full abstract»

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  • Technical and management notes: An approach toward improving the creative output of scientific task teams

    Publication Year: 1973 , Page(s): 29 - 31
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    Administration of an innovative task team today requires a capability to integrate not only the interrelated technical disciplines but also the relationships of the individual members as well. The team leader needs a tool to measure and characterize the members so that he can predict their interactions and structure his task teams accordingly. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Test, which places individuals in a scheme of personality types as established by the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung, was used effectively in a scientific task-team management situation. Jung theorized that such apparently random variations in human behavior is actually orderly and consistent and reflects certain basic differences in the way people prefer to use perception and judgement in a given situation. View full abstract»

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  • Toward the implementation of R&D resource allocation models

    Publication Year: 1973 , Page(s): 32 - 33
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    The allocation of organization resources to the R&D function remains one of the most complex and least rational decision processes of management. The purpose of this note is to examine the process and the implied attributes required of formal prescriptive models which will improve the process. Characteristics of the allocation problem are discussed briefly. This provides a rationale for listing those attributes which formal models should exhibit in order to contribute meaningfully to the rationality of the allocation process. View full abstract»

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  • About the authors

    Publication Year: 1973 , Page(s): 34
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Membership application for the IEEE engineering management group

    Publication Year: 1973 , Page(s): 35
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Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas