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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 1967

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  • Contents

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • About this issue

    Page(s): 75
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    AFTER a concentrated dose of “operations research” and “economic” type of papers in the March issue (a special issue containing selected papers on R&D Management from the 1966 Military Operations Research Symposium), the papers in this issue again discuss a variety of topics related to the management of R, D, & E. This variety does, however, contain two papers — those by Ledley et al. and by Hulbert and Scalera — related to the theme of the March issue. This theme contains the pervasive questions in activities such as Research, Development, and Engineering: how much should we spend and how shall we allocate the available funds among various opportunities? Many papers in this Transactions over the past seven years have been concerned with such questions. Since useful and general answers are not yet in sight, this theme will continue to be explored in future articles. View full abstract»

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  • Creative ability, the laboratory environment, and scientific performance

    Page(s): 76 - 83
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    Scientists and engineers, like other people, vary in their ability to be creative. Although some jobs in R & D are of a purely routine nature, it is commonly believed that creative ability is a useful attribute for the man in the laboratory. Yet when we measured the creative ability of some scientists and engineers, we found no simple relationship between it and their performance. Upon further exploration, we learned that whether or not creative ability “paid off” depended upon the man's laboratory environment. This paper describes the environments which proved to be good climates for creativity. View full abstract»

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  • A model for corporate growth by new product research productivity

    Page(s): 83 - 88
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    A highly simplified model for growth of corporate sales resulting from new product research shows that investment of a fixed annual fraction of profits in new product research and development leads to a feedback effect on growth. When the parameter β(k + Sγ) exceeds unity, annual sales grow exponentially. For values less than unity, sales reach a steady annual value. The factors in this critical parameter are: β = (total sales of new products)/(dollar of total sales) γ = (sales per old product item)/(sales per new product item) k = years life as a new product S = additional years life as an old product. The qualitative principles involved are of general validity. Although too crude for quantitative prediction of individual product return, the model may have rough quantitative value for whole businesses or large product classes. View full abstract»

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  • From engineer to manager — And back again

    Page(s): 88 - 92
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    This paper notes the increase in management possibilities for technically trained personnel, describes problem areas encountered by engineers in executive positions, and suggests ways to overcome such problems. By virtue of his training in orderly thinking and his involvement in technology — often a dominant function in modern industry — the engineer is particularly well suited for an executive position. But his technological background often contains the seeds of failure in management situations, and the author lists six points in modes of thought and areas of knowledge, which could prove to be pitfalls for the engineer turned manager. Each of these points, including management's own technology, touches upon an aspect of technical training which is the reverse, or very different from, requirements in management. As a check on the would-be manager's “general management IQ” the author includes seven short questions in areas of basic importance to top level management. An engineer's inability or unwillingness to master management's skills and fields of knowledge leads to his almost certain failure as a manager, and the author describes typical patterns of failure related to the six pitfall areas. But success is possible to the man who realizes the essential differences between the technical and management attitudes and skills, and who takes advantage of the countless avenues of management education which are available to him. View full abstract»

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  • Methodology to aid research planning

    Page(s): 92 - 105
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    This paper constitutes an attempt to explore and consider some pertinent management problems associated with planning a highly diversified research program. Research-planning methodology is defined as a broad plan for utilizing an ordered set of principles and/or procedures which describe, quantify, and evaluate areas and categories of research in accordance with their respective contributions to a research mission. Application of these pertinent principles, procedures, and techniques lead to a determination for the allocation of resources in a manner such that the expenditure of effort and resources may be said to constitute a well-ordered and balanced program. Examples of questions posed to this system are indicated and algorithms for methods of solution are illustrated. View full abstract»

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  • A British incentive-maintenance case study

    Page(s): 105 - 117
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    A study of a three-year-old incentive-maintenance scheme administered by the engineering department of a medium-sized British manufacturer of electrical insulation products is presented. A series of flow diagrams represents the operating procedures that have been developed. This scheme is represented as a control system in order to detect the feed-forward and feedback paths that determine its effectiveness. It has proved to be successful and has checked an earlier tendency for maintenance costs to rise with production volume. Rigorously its success is not so much due to its incentive nature as to the amount of pre-planning that now accompanies these engineering operations. View full abstract»

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  • Technical and management notes: The role of an engineering economy course

    Page(s): 118 - 119
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    The required senior course in engineering economy now gives a broad perspective to business operations, discusses the engineering functions, and summarizes the techniques for project evaluation. The professional demand for reports and proposals emphasizes the need for clear, concise writing. Proper economic analysis demands thorough planning and scheduling such as offered by the diagrammatic scheduling techniques. Invited presentations by industrial managers enliven the material. These students work with management more willingly and have a better perspective of developing their careers. View full abstract»

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  • About the authors

    Page(s): 120 - 121
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Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas