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Professional Communication, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 1981

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Displaying Results 1 - 24 of 24
  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 1
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  • Preface

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 62
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    THERE are two principles for making useful visual aids, particularly those large transparencies known as foils. There are hundreds of rules and guidelines for implementing and refining different kinds of visual aids and for making them attractive, but there are only two principles: comprehensibility and legibility. View full abstract»

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  • The practical writer

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 63 - 65
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    Bad writing is bad business and bad manners. When the reader must do the thinking that the writer neglected to do, the result may be different from what the writer intended. The hard part of writing is to use words in a way that serves the writer's aim. This is hard work because thinking is hard work, but careful thinking ultimately saves time and trouble for everyone concerned. Use common, short, expressive words; avoid words with many meanings. Be direct, simple, brief, vigorous, and lucid. Prefer the concrete to the abstract and the active voice to the passive. View full abstract»

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  • Power of the printed word

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 65 - 71
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    Three advertisements from the International Paper Co. series “The Power of the Printed Word” are reproduced: Kurt Vonnegut on “How to Write with Style” Edward Thompson on “How to Write Clearly” and Malcolm Forbes on “How to Write a Business Letter.” Guidelines and how-to advice are presented succinctly. Ed. View full abstract»

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  • Communicating technical information

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 72
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    Tradition prescribes the communication of good research by a written report, but adequate and timely reporting is the weakest link in industrial communication systems. Two mistakes made in trying to solve this problem are spending money instead of thought on communicating and assuming that writing is the same as communicating. Management must tell people what kinds of reports are needed for their decision making, establish the climate for motivating appropriate upward and horizontal flow of information, and respond to what is communicated. View full abstract»

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  • Translate your thoughts into good technical writing

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 73 - 74
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    You can make yourself easily understood on complex ideas by organizing and signaling the meaning of your thoughts in a clear way. Thoughts should be grouped in the order situation, problem, resolution, information — the SPRI system. Even an already written but confusing article can be improved by coding each sentence or passage with an S, P, R, or I and then reordering the text. View full abstract»

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  • Evaluate user documentation before you buy the software

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 75 - 78
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    Effective user documentation is legible, well illustrated, clearly indexed and written with the user's needs in mind. Evaluating software documentation before buying helps determine the true cost of installation. This evaluation should cover both communicative and technical quality. View full abstract»

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  • EDP user documentation: The missing link

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 79 - 83
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    To make documentation a strong link rather than the missing link between users and data processing systems, this guide introduces the professional-but not programmer-writer to software documentation. Included are recommendations on scope, conventions, language, types of instructions and aspects of format and layout. Procedures for reviewing and updating must also be considered and the draft document must be tested. View full abstract»

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  • Word watching: Who or whom?

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 84 - 85
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    To determine whether who or whom is correct in a particular circumstance, mentally rearrange the sentence, clause, or question in one or both of the following ways. Substitute another pronoun of the same form, i.e., nominative or objective, to fit the pattern. Omit any parenthetical phrase, leaving only the subject-verb or subject-verb-object. Many problematic examples are given. View full abstract»

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  • Artistic technical training

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 86 - 89
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    Creative technical art can attract attention and communicate technical messages by eliminating detail and focusing on specific points. Cartoons can carry a message by exaggeration or by transferring touchy personal characteristics away from the trainee. (Humor is used only to make a point memorable, not for entertainment, which is distracting.) Interpretive sketches and simplified drawings can show function or underlying principles of operation and can be used to impart human or animal characteristics to machinery. When-and-if (WHIF) charts can expand on a sequence of events or show cause-and-effect relationships. Each drawing must have a specific purpose to be effective. View full abstract»

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  • Speech: Another facet of technical communication

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 89 - 90
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    Three hundred sixty-seven engineering graduates responded to a survey by ranking 30 communication tasks according to their job importance and frequency of performance. The statistical result was that speaking tasks were rated slightly higher than writing tasks for all engineering fields surveyed, independent of whether the respondent spent more time in engineering or in management. Also, more than 50 percent had job-related spoken communication with technical personnel at least daily and with nontechnical personnel at least weekly. View full abstract»

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  • Presenting your viewpoint

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 91 - 94
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    Personal communication is the most effective way of getting your viewpoint across. The skills that support effective speaking are information control, physical self-control, and dialog direction (for question-and-answer sessions). Differences between speaking to a group of people and presenting via television are also discussed. View full abstract»

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  • How to overcome errors in public speaking

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 94 - 98
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    Ten common errors cause most public speaking failures. A positive approach in three stages can increase your chance for success. Preparation: 1. Plan to have an effect; don't just be speech-giving-oriented. 2. Determine the audience's interests, motives, knowledge, attitudes, and values. 3. Be aware of your credibility with the audience. 4. Capture attention with a confident, motivating introduction. 5. Organize your information for understanding. 6. Plan the conclusion to again place your objective before the audience. Presentation: 7. Control stage fright and channel the energy into dynamic speaking. 8. Be physically active and purposeful with gestures; vary speech characteristics; be natural and direct. 9. Sense audience feedback and adjust to it. Preservation: 10. Prepare for questions from the audience. View full abstract»

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  • Communicating at the top

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 99 - 101
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    The communication process has three main elements: the sender, the message, and the receiver. The sender's credibility and background relative to the message can affect the receiver. Differences between sender's and receiver's experiences and attitudes are also important in how a message is received. The words that comprise messages and the tones used to express them can vary the meaning and interpretation of messages. People differ in their susceptibility to persuasion. Emotion has an effect in persuasion but more important are the order of presentation and the believability and effectiveness of the sender. Those who know how to listen and pay attention not only stand out as beacons of courtesy but also have an advantage — by understanding what is expected of them — in preparing their messages for others. View full abstract»

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  • Verbal camouflage

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 102
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  • Double speak in America

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 102 - 103
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    Mario Pei discusses several sets of “weasel words.” Be on your guard, this author warns: these are words “used and misused not through habit, inadvertence, and accident, but coined or distorted, and then put into circulation by deliberate design, for purposes of deception” (p. 1). His earlier book on the same subject was called Words in Sheep's Clothing. View full abstract»

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  • Meta-talk, a guide to hidden meanings in conversation

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 103 - 104
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    The meta-talk of this book is the meaning that exists “around the edges” of a conversation: A says words and B hears them, but A may give or try to give or try not to give an impression at variance with his words, and B understands or misinterprets or ignores A's intentions. View full abstract»

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  • Ego-speak, why no one listens to you

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 104 - 105
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    This is a tongue-in-cheek book about noncommunication. Its subtitle seems to say everything necessary about using speech as a form of self-gratification, but the authors discuss 12 chief species of Ego-Speak and more than 30 subspecies. View full abstract»

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  • Your most enchanted listener

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 105 - 106
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    Readers who have paid attention so far will recognize at once that they themselves are frequently their own favorite speakers. “I would rather hear myself talk than listen to you,” says one disreputable character to another in a recent cartoon. “You are very uninteresting.” View full abstract»

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  • The technical communicator's handbook of technology transfer

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 106
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    The author discusses the rather highly specialized role of the technical communicator in promoting the process of technology transfer, i.e., industrial application of technologies that originally had been developed in Government research and development (R&D) programs. View full abstract»

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  • Personal documentation for professionals

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 106 - 107
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    “I know I read something on that some place.” We all know the situation. A colleague invites our comments on a topic in which we have some interest. We rummage our memories for a clue to what we've read or where we've read it. Finding no help there, we search our files. Alas! We have either not filed it or misfiled it. “One of these days,” we promise ourselves, “I'm going to organize the information I pick up.” View full abstract»

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  • Call for papers special issue: More usable information through graphics

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 108
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Professional Communication Society 1981 Conference

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 109
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  • Information for authors and readers of the IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 110 - 112
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to applied research on professional communication--including but not limited to technical and business communication. It has been published since 1957 by the Professional Communication Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Saul Carliner
Concordia University