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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 1985

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Contents

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 1985 Index IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management Vol. EM-32

    Page(s): 1 - 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • About this issue

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (253 KB)  

    SEVERAL PAPERS in this issue deal with major management techniques such as decision analysis, systems analysis, and an emerging management technology having to do with problem solving. A striking feature of the papers in this issue is that most of them are authored by people who are not in university groups. They are from laboratories and companies which are not usually the source of papers about management methodology snd theory. Perhaps this reflects an emerging trend toward moving the development and certainly the implementation of management “technologies” from academic to operating organizations. View full abstract»

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  • New editor for IEEE transactions on engineering management

    Page(s): 2
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    PROFESSOR A. H. RUBENSTEIN, who has been editor of this TRANSACTIONS since I960, announced his intention to resign from that position approximately one year ago. A search committee was established by the Engineering Management Society and half a dozen potential successors were identified all of whom have published in this TRANSACTIONS and are very active in the field of engineering management and the management of R&D/Innovation. The choice was a difficult one. but the search committee ultimately recommended Professor Dundar Kocaoglu of the University of Pittsburgh who has accepted the appointment as of January 1, 1985. Professor Kocaoglu has exciting plans for further expanding the scope of this TRANSACTIONS and for researching a larger percentage of IEEE members who, although they have engineering management responsibilities, do not currently belong to the Engineering Management Society or subscribe to the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT. In addition, he plans to continue reaching out to people in other professional societies who arc engaged in research and practice in this important field. We wish him success in this endeavor. View full abstract»

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  • Decision analysis in project management: An overview

    Page(s): 3 - 9
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    The authors include very general topical summaries in utility theory, mathematical programming, statistical methods, scoring and ranking methods, and cognitive science. The emphasis is on the role of decision analysis in the management of research and development projects. The intent is to provide nonspecialists with a broad survey of the many facets of decision theory. View full abstract»

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  • A methodology for organizing performance requirements for complex dynamical systems

    Page(s): 10 - 15
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    An orderly methodology for establishing performance requirements for complex systems is described. The systems engineering performance methodology uses a top-down approach. Connections between the system high level mission requirements and the lower level functional performance requirements are made in a series of steps. The steps include identification of system activities, identification of activity-derived state vector elements, definition of state maintenance functions, and identification of functional components. Examples of the application of the methodology to a space station flight control problem are presented, and a discussion of application considerations is given. View full abstract»

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  • R&D project termination in high-tech industries

    Page(s): 16 - 23
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    Based on extensive data on 51 R and D projects in high-tech companies, a discriminant analysis produced 16 factors which discriminated the decision to continue or terminate a project in the development phase. The most important discriminating variables were found to be the strategic (the extent to which the project conformed to corporate, economic, and marketing objectives) parameters of the high-technology research environment. Specifically, high rates of product turnover, high market share, and small size were found to lead to continuations, whereas infancy stage product life cycle and innovative versus aligned strategy led to terminations. In contrast to high-tech firms, `non-high-tech' projects were found to have greater potential for continuation where product turnover was low and projects had limited focused end uses offering sizable profit margins. View full abstract»

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  • Transfer of Fossil-fueled power-plant engineering and design technology

    Page(s): 24 - 28
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    Fossil-fuelled power-plant technology was recently the subject of transfer from a US engineering/architectural firm to a joint venture in Taiwan. Some of the project management activities and experiences in the formation and growth of such a joint venture, with particular emphasis on the electrical group are described. The topics covered include: the formation of the joint venture, the choice of donor's staff, the selection of local staff, methods by which the transfer was achieved, the development of supervisors, progress assessment of the program, the effect of the experience on the donors, and the ongoing exchange of ideas. View full abstract»

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  • Expert intuition and ill-structured problem solving

    Page(s): 29 - 33
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    The expert decision maker, when confronted by ill-structured problems, is shown to rely largely on nonverbalizeable intuitive thought processes based on concrete experience. Examples of ill-structured problems used include innovation, executive decision making, and diagnostic evaluations by project managers. Here, neither the goal nor the procedure for accomplishing the goal is well understood at the outset. Problems requiring computation are not treated. The organizational, educational, and analytical approaches for increasing this individual's productivity are then explored. View full abstract»

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  • Technical and management notes: The technically-oriented personality in management

    Page(s): 33 - 36
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    Offers practical insights into the technically oriented personality by briefly discussing several developmental, educational, and work experiences which are often common to such people. The classic dilemma faced by people who provide a technically specialized service to an organization is that such people must choose between the management route or the technical individual-contributor route of career development. Five important areas covering skill and personality variables are discussed. It is stressed that these areas should be reviewed and analyzed by a person faced with such a choice and should be considered by those responsible for decisions concerning such people. Finally, several suggestions for those who manage other technical professionals are offered. View full abstract»

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  • Creativity & innovation network

    Page(s): 37
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    The international review and forum for all those concerned with discovery processes View full abstract»

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  • About the authors

    Page(s): 41 - 42
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas