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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 1966

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Contents

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Copyright page

    Page(s): 1
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  • About this issue

    Page(s): 159
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    THE FIRST and last papers in this issue relate to questions of perennial interest to participants in and observers of the Research, Development, and Engineering (R, D, and E) process — the “job content” and “behavioral style” of people in R, D, and E. Erickson reports on a survey of supervisors' perceptions of “actual” and “ideal” work style among their professional subordinates. Her results give some basis for inference about the perceivers' satisfaction with the organization. However, the raw data themselves — descriptions of the work style of the professionals and the grouping of behavior patterns into “types” — may be of more direct interest to readers of the TRANSACTIONS who are responsible for supervising R, D, and E personnel. View full abstract»

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  • Perceived variations in work style of the professional employee (“actual” and “ideal”) at nots

    Page(s): 160 - 166
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    In the spring of 1961, 24 high-level supervisory personnel at U. S. Naval Ordnance Test Station (NOTS) were asked to sort the cards in a Q-sort deck twice; once as descriptive of “the professional employee at NOTS” and again as descriptive of “what you feel the professional employee at NOTS should be.” The two perceived “actual” work styles which emerged from the analysis of the data were clearly differentiated and could be clearly defined. Two “ideal” work styles also emerged from the analysis, but they were much less clearly differentiated. The discrepancy between the perceived work style of the “actual” and “ideal” NOTS professional appeared to have potential value as an index of the perceiver's satisfaction with the organization. View full abstract»

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  • Some sources of uncertainty and their consequences in engineering design projects

    Page(s): 167 - 180
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    The primary intent of this study is to identify what first-level technical supervisors perceive as the causes of uncertainty in their design work. The projects studied involved prototype designs by groups of engineers. Sources of uncertainty were defined as factors, including interpersonal relations, which caused group leaders to see more than one possible outcome to decisions during the problem-solving process of design. View full abstract»

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  • Effects of incentive contracts in research and development: A preliminary research report

    Page(s): 181 - 187
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    Five research and development contracts that were converted from a cost reimbursement basis to a form of cost incentive contract were studied by interviews with government and contractor personnel associated with the projects. The analyses of these contracts indicate that during negotiations for incentive conversions, contractors avoid risk by some combination of stalling and allowing time to reduce technical uncertainty or by refusing to negotiate agreements that contain cost sharing possibilities. Little evidence was found that would support the theoretical assertion that contractors would alter their behavior to seek the improved profits possible under R&D incentive contracts. However, the evidence does indicate that losses on incentive contracts are highly motivating and may even lead to harmful shortcutting and work stoppage threats. View full abstract»

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  • Lagged manpower relationships in development projects

    Page(s): 188 - 195
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    Given several important assumptions, this paper suggests that the time phasing of the various skills utilized on a development project result in reasonably stable manpower relationships. The author establishes guidelines intended to sharpen, not replace, management's forecasts of its manpower needs throughout the life of a development program. For the study, he selects five development programs from a single aerospace firm. He discusses the relationships that exist between manpower from the firm's engineering operation and two other operations “downstream” in the development sequence: 1) manufacturing, and 2) quality control and testing. Using simple correlation analysis, the author explores both the time lags present in the application of manpower from the three operations to a development program and the comparative manpower requirements among the operations for given time lags. View full abstract»

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  • Engineering management techniques to prepare a user for a new electronic information processing system

    Page(s): 196 - 200
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    One of the essential elements in the introduction of a new information system is to take adequate steps to assure that the user is thoroughly indoctrinated in the operation of his system, that he can employ it and act on it with the highest degree of confidence. View full abstract»

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  • Organizational dynamics of project management

    Page(s): 201 - 205
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    Since World War II, the project manager has emerged in American industry — particularly in areas of defense production. His responsibility is to the successful completion of a specific assignment, rather than to a structure of hierarchy. Often, he must cut across traditional lines of authority. View full abstract»

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  • About the authors

    Page(s): 206 - 207
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management Annual index volume EM-13, 1966

    Page(s): 1 - 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas