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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 1969

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Contents

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • About this issue

    Page(s): 1
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    THE five technical articles in this issue all relate to one general theme in the management of R, D, & E — problems of measurement for use in decisionmaking, evaluation, and control. Three of these five papers were written by people currently working in industrial or government organizations, and a fourth was written as the result of a summer visiting program in a government organization (NASA). These papers, and the work they represent, reflect management's intense interest in obtaining valid measurements on which to base their decisions. View full abstract»

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  • A mathematical basis for the selection of research projects

    Page(s): 2 - 8
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    A method is presented for determining the money to be spent on product oriented research programs. The method is used by American Cyanamid's Organic Chemicals Division. View full abstract»

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  • Some antecedents and consequences of scientific performance

    Page(s): 9 - 16
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    Relationships between organizational factors and the performance of 151 engineers were studied to determine the extent to which the factors preceded performance and performance preceded the factors. Four factors were related significantly to subsequent performance: involvement in work, colleague contact, diversity of work activities, and number of subordinates. Every factor studied (these four, plus salary and influence on work goals) was related to previous performance. The performance-factor sequence was much more predominant than the factor-performance sequence. An engineer's performance apparently has pervasive consequences for his social-psychological working environment. View full abstract»

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  • An evaluation of measurable characteristics within Army laboratories

    Page(s): 16 - 23
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    The problem of this study was to develop information that might help management of a laboratory complex. Fifteen measurable characteristics from 15 Army laboratories were studied in an attempt to find some that were strategic to the management of Army laboratories. Measurable characteristics were evaluated using two standards: 1) number of papers and invention disclosures, and 2) laboratory performance. Measurable characteristics that were evaluated included R&D experience, age, civilian salary, and in-house R&D obligations. The study results when using two independent standards were similar. That is, a number of measurable characteristics were required in both evaluations in order to achieve a meaningful relationship between characteristics and standard. Furthermore, the characteristics that could improve performance were the same as those that could also increase the number of papers and invention disclosures. Results indicate that it is possible to predict laboratory performance with greater confidence than to predict the number of papers and invention disclosures. It was concluded that measurable characteristics were of importance to management of the Army laboratory complex. Large amounts of R&D in-house funds are necessary in order to achieve small increases in laboratory performance. An increase in R&D experience on the part of military R&D personnel would be a better alternative than funding. View full abstract»

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  • Methods of analyzing the impact of program stretchouts

    Page(s): 23 - 35
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    The increased use of incentive contracts has not eliminated, and may even have increased, the number of changes involved in the procurement of a major aerospace system. One kind of change is the program stretchout that extends the duration of an ongoing program by means of a formal contract change. The principal causes of program stretchouts and the potential benefits and costs resulting from stretchouts are discussed in this paper. Methods of equitably determining the responsibility and dividing of costs for stretchouts between government and contractor are explored. Current methods used to analyze the impact of stretchouts are evaluated and, finally, recommendations for establishing explicit guidelines in fixing responsibility for stretchout costs are set forth. View full abstract»

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  • The validity of subjective probability of success forecasts by R & D project managers

    Page(s): 35 - 49
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    Models and techniques to aid management in planning and controlling R&D projects frequently use subjective probability of success forecasts as one of the major inputs. An experiment was conducted at the research laboratories of Monsanto Company to measure the predictive validity and consistency of such forecasts. The results indicate that the eventual success or failure of certain types of R&D projects can be predicted by measuring the time shape of polled probability of success forecasts. Probability of success forecasts appear to yield more valid advance warning indicators than several commonly used project status measures. These results tend to support the hypothesis that R&D planning and control models that are based on subjective probability estimates may realiably be used by management to aid in early identification of eventually failing projects, as well as to aid in project selection and project funding. View full abstract»

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  • Technical and management notes: Difference between engineers and scientists

    Page(s): 50 - 53
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    Engineers and scientists exhibit important differences other than the evident differences in degree discipline and type of work activity. For example, most engineers recognize managerial authority, want challenging assignments, and are employer-oriented. Scientists, however, respect “colleague” authority, want freedom to select projects, and are career-oriented. Most behavioral differences are found to be functions of the work environment; thus the challenge to management is to understand how the engineer or scientist perceives his environment. View full abstract»

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  • About the authors

    Page(s): 53 - 54
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    Freely Available from IEEE
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Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas