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Electrical Engineering

Issue 2 • Date Feb. 1955

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 45
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Contents

    Page(s): c2
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  • Contents

    Page(s): 1A
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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): 2A
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  • Highlights

    Page(s): 3A
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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): 4A
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  • We're in the red

    Page(s): 95
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    IN his article in the January issue of Electrical Engineering, C. S. Purnell, Chairman of the Finance Committee, pointed out that the budget for the year beginning October 1, 1954, anticipates a deficit of about $106,000. In the calendar of the Institute, a budget year overlaps portions of two fiscal years. It has been done that way in an attempt to make the budget year coincide approximately with the period during which the Institute committees function. The fiscal year starts on May 1. It is the year for which the member pays his dues and in return receives the publications and other benefits of membership. View full abstract»

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  • Returns on 1954 employment questionnaire

    Page(s): 96 - 97
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    Answers to the questions on Employment Conditions recently sent to AIEE members have been tabulated, and the results are given in this summary. According to the returns, participation represented a good cross section of membership throughout the country. View full abstract»

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  • The first five years of professional development

    Page(s): 98 - 100
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    The trial run of the Engineers' Council for Professional Development's professional development program in the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, which has the full co-operation of industry, the universities, and the professional societies, is receiving nation wide attention. As honorary chairman of the Training Committee, President Monteith reviews the objectives, activities, and progress of the Council in this undertaking. View full abstract»

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  • Employers, ethics, and novice engineers

    Page(s): 101 - 102
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    Among engineers, their professional status is one of today's live questions. That question is frequently dismissed with a statement that each engineer must improve his individual status by acting and living in a professional manner—that only thus will the status of the profession as a whole be improved. Some observations of Dean Freund, presented in this brief and thought-provoking article, point out that the above is not the whole story; that most engineers are employees; that their employers can make a real contribution to improving the status of the profession; and that such a contribution would be in the enlightened self-interest of such employers. I commend Dean Freund's article to the thoughtful consideration of the membership of the Institute. View full abstract»

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  • Aircraft windshields heated with conductive films

    Page(s): 103
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    PREVENTING the formation of ice on outside surfaces of aircraft windshields is a serious problem to the designers of all-weather aircraft. The development of a transparent conductive film which can be applied to a glass surface promises to offer an ultimate solution to this problem. By means of the transparent conductive film, electric energy can be dissipated near the windshield surface resulting in excellent deicing characteristics. View full abstract»

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  • Implementation of a research program for the electrical utility industry

    Page(s): 104 - 109
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    The electrical utility industry has a need for more extensive research activities to investigate basic problems and to provide for its long-range needs. Such a program should attract the interest of engineering students, who oftentimes believe that the power industry offers little opportunity for creativeness. View full abstract»

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  • Educating electrical engineers to exploit science

    Page(s): 110 - 115
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    Are the future electrical engineers being trained broadly enough in the sciences? This question has been given serious study at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, with the result that major changes have been made in the undergraduate electrical curriculum, so as to better equip the students with technical substance and professional vision. View full abstract»

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  • Nuclear power plants for ship-propulsion Application

    Page(s): 116 - 121
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    The application of atomic power to the C-4 Mariner-Class cargo vessel is analyzed in some detail. It shows that at present nuclear power cannot compete on a strictly economic basis with conventional power plants. However, other factors such as weight, space, speed, and range considerations would also enter into any complete evaluation of the application of atomic power for marine purposes. View full abstract»

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  • Field tests on a 100-megawatt rectifier installation

    Page(s): 122
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    THE 100-megawatt rectifier station at the Robert P. Patterson Plant of the Reynolds Metals Company is the largest concentration of d-c power on a single bus in this country. Power for the plant is obtained from 24 double-Y ignitron rectifier assemblies, each rated at 5,208 amperes and 800 volts. In March 1954, an extensive field-test program, involving both load switching and arc backs, was conducted at this rectifier station. View full abstract»

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  • Effect of synchronous-machine transient rotor saliency

    Page(s): 123
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    IN most studies of power system disturbances made on the a-c network analyzer, the transient rotor saliency of the synchronous machines is neglected. The validity of this assumption is well established. However, in some cases it has been desirable to measure the variations in several of the bus voltages during the disturbance. When the bus is electrically near to a synchronous machine (in the limit, when the voltage in question is at the terminals of one of the synchronous machines), the validity of neglecting saliency may be questioned. View full abstract»

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  • Lighting a modern refinery process unit

    Page(s): 124 - 127
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    Within the past few years more attention has been paid to increasing and bettering illumination in work areas. While progress has been made in outdoor lighting, there is room for improvement in those exteriors where 24-hour operations need adequate lights. Although this article applies to a refinery, there are ideas applicable to many industries. View full abstract»

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  • Field current sources for electric defibrillation

    Page(s): 128
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    UNDER certain conditions, the heart may lose its rhythmic pumping action and cease the circulation of blood. This situation is known as ventricular fibrillation and may occur during surgical procedures or as a consequence of electric shock. Normal heart action may be restored by passing an electric current of suitable characteristics through the heart. In the operating room, defibrillation is accomplished by applying electrodes to the heart directly and passing a 60-cycle alternating-current of from 1.5 to 2 amperes through the heart (120 to 135 volts). When fibrillation results from an electric shock received under field conditions, electrodes cannot be applied to the heart directly but may be applied to the surface of the body to permit sufficient current to flow through the heart to effect defibrillation. In animal experiments with electrodes at the chest,1 defibrillation has been accomplished reliably by the use of 60-cycle alternating-current, 480 volts, 15 amperes applied for periods up to about 1 second. Such a current first brings the heart to a standstill; upon interruption of the current, the heart will usually resume its pumping action provided the elapsed time between the onset of fibrillation and the application of defibrillation current is not excessive. View full abstract»

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  • Difference equations for magnetic amplifiers

    Page(s): 129
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    THE analysis of magnetic amplifiers through the use of difference equations will result in a different view of the mechanics of operation of the magnetic amplifier. It shows that all magnetic amplifiers operate upon the same basic principles, and that these basic principles are demonstrated by the operation of the basic half-cycle response magnetic amplifier shown in Fig. 1. The purpose of the analysis presented in this article is only to clarify these basic principles. View full abstract»

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  • Organization Planning — The hard work and common sense approach

    Page(s): 130 - 135
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    The Department on Organization in an oil company was created to perform the function of organization planning. Surveys conducted by this department have resulted in many significant organizational improvements throughout the company. View full abstract»

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  • A new system of logarithmic units

    Page(s): 135 - 137
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    As the scientific field expands, especially that of electrical engineering mathematics, the number of specialized logarithms in use has been increasing. How should they be labeled? How should their magnitude be expressed? Here is one answer. View full abstract»

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  • Additions to z-transformation theory

    Page(s): 138
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    ONE of the most powerful mathematical methods for analysis of sampled-data systems is known as the z-transformation method. The z-transform is obtained by substituting z for est in the Laplace transform of the sequence of samples. C(z) is obtained in closed form with the aid of Table I. View full abstract»

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  • Designing to reduce maintenance costs

    Page(s): 139 - 141
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    Maintenance is a broad subject and not exclusively confined to electrical installations. However, so as to be of practical value to electrical engineers, this article is confined to this field. View full abstract»

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  • Evaluating the effect of nonlinearity in a 2-phase motor

    Page(s): 142
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    A 2-PHASE induction motor is inherently a nonlinear device, but normal practice in the design of servomechanisms has been to represent it with a linear transfer function. This is obtained by assuming that the speed versus torque curves of the motor, for fixed reference field voltage and various values of control field voltage, are parallel straight lines. View full abstract»

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  • Permanent magnet excited synchronous motors

    Page(s): 143
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    FRACTIONAL-HORSEPOWER synchronous motors are generally available for quantity production in only the reluctance or hysteresis types. The reasons for this are: the simplicity of their rotor constructions, because of the omission of d-c excitation; and the possibility of assembling the rotors of either type in standard induction motor frames. Unfortunately, these advantages are offset by inferior performance characteristics, such as low efficiency, low-power factor, and low output, when compared to that of the same size induction motor. The locked rotor torque is also low and in the reluctance type, extremely variable. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Periodical ceased publication in 1963. The current retitled publication is IEEE Spectrum.

Full Aims & Scope