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Network, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date Oct. 1987

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Front inside cover]

    Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Contents

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Advertisements]

    Page(s): 2
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  • Guest editorial

    Page(s): 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1501 KB)  

    Even fifteen years ago, most of us felt privileged to be co-located with a terminal room enabling us to run our various programs on remote mainframes. Those in the most technical positions, such as programmers and equipment designers, had nearby labs with somewhat more impressive, but bulky equipment. We communicated with our associates, suppliers, and customers either face-to-face or via telephone. Our presentations were prepared by hand and made presentable by clerical staff. Paper documents were transmitted by mail or courier; paper tape was still sometimes used for data. Any suggestion to an executive that he type something for himself was immediately met by indignation. View full abstract»

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  • E-mail — The “glue” to office automation

    Page(s): 4 - 10
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    The author presents some criteria that can be used to evaluate and select an electronic mail system to best suit the communications needs of a particular office. Network design guidelines for implementing this e-mail system at minimal cost are given to illustrate the concepts and issues discussed. The AT&T Private Message Exchange is examined in detail. View full abstract»

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  • Design of a public electronic mail system

    Page(s): 11 - 15
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    The influence on electronic mail system development from its environment are discussed. Enhancements to an electronic mail system, such as bilingual operation, enhanced reach to nonusers, and interconnection with other systems, as well as new applications, such as EDI support and extensive customer support capabilities, are described. A public, network-based electronic mail system with more than 60000 users, is used to illustrate the influences described. View full abstract»

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  • Electronic data interchange

    Page(s): 16 - 20
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    Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), a process to automate the exchange of information traditionally transmitted via trade documents, is examined. Trade documents include such administrative forms as: purchase orders, invoices, price lists, and bills of lading, among others. Currently, this type of information is transmitted by mail, courier, telephone or telex. The advantages of automating this information exchange are discussed. The major problem in accomplishing this automation is the total lack of consistency in end user document types, structure and format. This is compounded by the variety of data storage techniques and equipment, and the availability of suitable communication networks. Progress in overcoming these obstacles is outlined, with examples, for a publicly available electronic data interchange service. View full abstract»

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  • The integration of voice and data communication

    Page(s): 21 - 29
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    The author explores the motivations behind voice and data integration, the possible consumer use of this integration and the relative advantages and disadvantages of various levels of integration. The natural combination of office automation functionality with voice/data integration is explored. The relationship between this integration and the integrated services digital network (ISDN) is discussed. The direction of the technology of voice/data integration is predicted. View full abstract»

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  • The effects of office automation

    Page(s): 30 - 34
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    The experiences of a large law firm that, in 1985, made a major decision to automate key functions are described. Care was taken to ensure a good understanding of the cause and effect of any changes made. The major issue being examined is the tendency of many organizations to be very conscientious about the development of plans and strategies but cavalier about the social and organizational implications resulting from the implementation of the very same plans. View full abstract»

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  • The IEEE network forum

    Page(s): 35 - 38
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  • Technology perspective

    Page(s): 39 - 41
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    I remember my first experience with Office Automation. Of course, I didn't know at the time to call it that. I just called it electronic mail. Exchanging messages with groups of people that I worked with was a great time saver. I also remember my frustration when I found out that I couldn't send mail outside my own department. My secretary had her first brush with office automation on a word processing system. The problem again was that her system couldn't communicate with other systems. I found spreadsheets valuable, but I found myself mailing floppy disks around to exchange data. Obviously, we needed something better. View full abstract»

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  • Information infrastructure

    Page(s): 42 - 43
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    Virtually every enterprise includes a component that can be generously termed “an office.” It is there that the locus of administration can be found: record keeping, correspondence files, payment of bills, accounting, personnel records including payroll, and so on. And, although offices vary dramatically in scope and complexity, they share a substantial number of similar functions, and thus form a common market for many products and services. View full abstract»

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  • Open systems standards

    Page(s): 44 - 45
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    In the last issue, I explained the basis of the international standards activities that are developing Open Systems standards. Now, I will cover the activities in the United States that contribute to the international work and that, in the end, produce American National Standards for application in the USA. View full abstract»

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  • A shot in the dark

    Page(s): 46
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    The following two articles are contributions to a new and probably sporadically appearing section of IEEE NETWORK: the “Shot in the Dark.” Articles and columns which are intended to be thought-provoking or controversial, and which may not fit within the theme of a particular IEEE NETWORK issue, but are deemed timely for publication, may appear here. “Transportation for Scientists” is offered as an allegorical look at communications services, viewed in the context of the 19th century explosion in new forms of transportation. The accompanying commentary by Dr. Danny Cohen on “Communication for Scientists” provides a controversial interpretation of the allegory. Comments and discussion on both the Finnegan and Cohen contributions are invited and, if any are received which may be of interest to our readers, will be presented in succeeding issues. View full abstract»

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  • Transportation for scientists

    Page(s): 46 - 47
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    In the nineteenth century many scientists in the country worked on alchemy. Some of them were on the East Coast at several universities mainly around the Boston area, and some were in California, at universities around Los Angeles and San Francisco. View full abstract»

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  • Communication for scientists

    Page(s): 47
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    In spite of what my dear friend and colleague Prof. Finnegan reports, in his article “Transportation for Scientists,” the reality on this Planet makes alternative (c) to be the most reasonable approach. View full abstract»

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  • Conference calendar

    Page(s): 48
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  • 1987 Index: IEEE Network Magazine Vol. 1

    Page(s): 1 - 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Back inside cover]

    Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Network covers topics which include: network protocols and architecture; protocol design and validation; communications software; network control, signaling and management; network implementation (LAN, MAN, WAN); and micro-to-host communications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Xuemin (Sherman) Shen, PhD
Engineering University of Waterloo