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Computer Graphics and Applications, IEEE

Issue 12 • Date Dec. 1984

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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): c1
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  • [Front inside cover - advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): c2
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  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 1
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  • Advertisements

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • About the cover

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 4 - 5
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    Santa Claus and the Elves was painted on an Aurora/100 Videographics System. This system is the modern progeny of the first computer paint system, which was developed in the early 70's by my partner, Dick Shoup, who at that time was working at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. This pioneering effort resulted in the award of the 1983 Emmy for Technical Achievement to both Shoup and Xerox Corporation. View full abstract»

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  • Displays on display

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 6 - 7
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    The accompanying images are the work of two computer graphics specialists working individually. Cubicomp software engineer Jim Dixon did “Lunar Explorer” and “Pipes.” The other four images were done by Cubicomp artist Wilson Burrows. All were created on the Cubicomp Poly-cad-10 system, consisting of the company's 3-D solid modeling software and frame buffer, which displays 4096 colors out of a possible 16.7 million at a resolution of 512 × 512. View full abstract»

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  • Call for papers

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 7 - 9
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  • Guest editor's introduction

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 10 - 12
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    This is the second of two special issues on Human Factors in Computer Graphics and Applications. It was originally intended to be one issue. However, due to the very large, high-quality response from a call for papers, we are pleased to have sufficient papers for two issues. (See the November 1984 issue of CG&A.) View full abstract»

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  • The user interface for Sapphire

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 13 - 23
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    Sapphire (the Screen Allocation Package Providing Helpful Icons and Rectangular Environments) is a powerful window manager running on the PERQ personal workstation. Following some background material, the author provides a tutorial on Sapphire's screen allocation package, focusing on its icons and user commands. The icons in Sapphire are intended to enhance the user's productivity when executing multiple tasks concurrently. Therefore, they present six pieces of information about the process being run, as well as two pieces of information about the status of the window. Thus, the user can easily tell whether the process running in the window has an error or wants attention and what percentage of the task has been completed. The user interface provides full functionality from both the pointing device and the keyboard and is easy for the novice while providing simple and powerful operations for experts. All commands are available from pop-up menus, but accelerators allow the most common commands to be executed with a single button press. The picture in the tracking symbol changes to show the operation that will be performed. This user interface promotes experimentation, since there is always appropriate feedback, and it is always possible to abort an operation once it has been started. View full abstract»

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  • Corporate identity for iconic interface design: The graphic design perspective

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 24 - 32
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    The term corporate identity program is well-known in the graphic design field, which has applied the approach to the traditional areas of stationery, vehicle identification, signage, and other forms of complex communication. It is argued that this approach should be extended to the design of screens, especially for high-resolution, iconic, multiwindow interfaces. Typography, symbolism, and color are discussed from this perspective, and three case studies, namely, the Xerox Star, the Apple Lisa, and the Intran Metaform system, are examined. View full abstract»

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  • A context for user interface management

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 33 - 42
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    The design of the user interface management system (UIMS) is discussed within the context of the problems that it is intended to solve. The aim is not to review the various forms and strategies that have been proposed and used for UIMS development but rather to clarify the environment of a UIMS. The issues, which relate the services of a UIMS to the applications that it is intended to support, range along a continuum from the keystroke/transaction level, or micro level, to the macro level of integration across an entire application environment. Three examples are presented to illustrate the range of this continuum and the issues that arise at each level. View full abstract»

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  • Teaching a course on human factors and computer systems

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 43 - 47
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    The goal of the course was to teach students how to design and evaluate computer systems for ease of use by conducting human performance experiments, using analytic models and methods, and examining the research literature. This was accomplished through lectures, discussions, videotapes, demonstrations, guest lecturers, homework assignments, and projects. The link between research and design was particularly emphasized. In the postcourse evaluations, students gave the course a `very good' rating. View full abstract»

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  • A report on the vail workshop on human factors in computer systems

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 48 - 67
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    A detailed description is given of the aims of the Vail workshop and of the recommendations of the participants. The issues identified and addressed were: system design tools; user models; system development process; task taxonomy; sociological impact; professional qualification; public relations; aid for novices; and workstation design. View full abstract»

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  • Application briefs: Computer animation shows inner workings of human body

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 68 - 70
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    Computer-generated 3-D animation sequences by the special effects house, Cranston/Csuri Productions, Inc., of Columbus, Ohio, are featured in a 24-episode educational miniseries, “The Living Body,” produced in Britain and aired in Europe beginning this fall. Some of the sequences depict the rotation of a transparent three-dimensional human body that allows viewers to see its internal organs and anatomical structures from different positions. View full abstract»

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  • Selective update: IEEE computer graphics and applications gets new editor-in-chief

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 71 - 74
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    Martha Sloan, president of IEEE Computer Society, is pleased to announce her appointment of Lansing Hatfield as editor-in-chief of IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. He will succeed Michael Wozny, who is stepping down as of January 1985. The appointment was recommended by the Society's Publications Board, with the consent of the Governing Board, at their meetings in Chicago in early November. View full abstract»

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  • New products

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 75 - 83
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  • Product highlights

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 84 - 85
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  • Professional calendar

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 86 - 87
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  • Classified [advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 87
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  • Advertiser index — December 1984

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 96 - 98
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  • 1984 Index IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications Magazine Vol. 4

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 88 - 95
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  • [Back inside cover - advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): c3
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  • [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
L. Miguel Encarnação
University of Iowa