By Topic

Proceedings of the IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 2013

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 25
  • Front cover

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (498 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Proceedings of the IEEE publication information

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (68 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of Contents

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 1 - 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (375 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Changing of the Guard [Point of View]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 3 - 4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (115 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • “Beyond HDTV” [Scanning the Issue]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 5 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (141 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • UHDTV Image Format for Better Visual Experience

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 8 - 17
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1431 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Ultrahigh-definition television (UHDTV) is now being studied as the most promising candidate for next-generation television beyond HDTV. It consists of extremely high-resolution imagery and multichannel 3-D sound to give viewers a stronger sensation of reality. Various aspects should be taken into account when determining UHDTV image format. Of those, it is believed that user visual experience is some of the most important aspects to be considered. This paper describes the studies conducted on the relationship between image format and visual experience of UHDTV. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A New Wide-Gamut RGB Primary Set and Efficient Color Encoding Methods for Ultrahigh-Definition Television (UHDTV)

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 18 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2192 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper introduces a new wide-gamut RGB primary set and a new color-encoding method that are developed for ultrahigh-definition television (UHDTV). The extended gamut RGB-primary set compared with the conventional CRT-centric gamut is proposed in favor of inclusion of real-world surface colors and in consideration of the current and prospective colorimetric characteristics of flat panel displays using which UHDTV programs will likely be reproduced. The new color encoding method is derived to enable luminance and chrominance information to be accurately separated, resulting in orthogonal video signals. The new luma and color-difference signals generated by the newly derived encoding scheme are demonstrated to have insignificant crosstalk. It is also shown that this fact can contribute to improving image quality after subsampling color-difference components and to increasing compression efficiency. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Color Management for Future Video Systems

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 31 - 44
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (564 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Color management has been well established for still images and professional videos but not for consumer videos. It is necessary to develop color management that is suitable for consumer videos. A color management system (CMS) renders reproduced color or preferred color on a display through video signal processing. A complete color management workflow includes color processing from a camera to a display. Recent explosive advances of electronic imaging technologies complicate color management in that the chromaticity characteristics of modern displays and cameras depend on their new implementation technologies. Thus, color management is one of the key issues for modern imaging devices. This paper first reviews issues of video color management in the state of the art. Then, a color management workflow is proposed for an example to solve the difficulties of current video color management. The proposed workflow also can be applied to the improvement of the color management for professional videos. In this workflow, a video frame of the scene captured by a camera is output referred to a virtual display, in which its white point depends on the captured scene to account for changing adapted white. The chromaticity parameters of the virtual display are embedded in the ancillary data of a video frame. The chromaticity parameters of the destination display to show the image are embedded in hardware. A color management module in the destination display retrieves these chromaticity parameters for color gamut mapping which maps colors of the virtual display to colors of the destination display. The chromaticity characterization and calibration of cameras and displays are reviewed and discussed. The color gamut mapping algorithms of several color rendering intents are shown for examples. A method is proposed for calculating the color gamut boundary of a device in hardware so that color gamut mapping is able to operate in time for video applications. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Wedge Optics in Flat Panel Displays

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 45 - 60
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1222 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Liquid crystal display (LCD) technology will struggle to display high resolution on screens as big as whiteboards. Yet there is demand also for less power consumption, 3-D images, and that the display should be able to see gestures and feel touch. Most of these features are possible with projection and wedge light guides make projection slim, but picoprojectors are so dim that many will be needed for such a big screen. For now, we use instead a hybrid of technologies: light guides look out from behind an LCD to see where the viewers' hands and eyes are, and a collimated backlight lets us illuminate one view at a time to each eye. This lets us synthesize 3-D with achievable increases in LCD frame rate. We expect that this combination of a multiview 3-D display and a view-dependent rendered image will give us the potential to televise the experience of looking through a window. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • High-Resolution CMOS Video Image Sensors

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 61 - 73
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1504 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    High-definition television (HDTV) images are now commonly available and the recent trend of video applications is toward even higher spatial resolutions with higher pixel rates. To make such high-resolution video images possible, the sensor must have a line time, or one row time, of less than a few microseconds with a pixel rate greater than gigapixels per second. In this paper, the basics of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors and the architectures/technologies used to obtain such high resolutions and frame rates are reviewed and the technologies to obtain the highest possible quality video images are explained. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • 8K Extremely-High-Resolution Camera Systems

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 74 - 88
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2658 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Research and development of ultrahigh-definition imaging systems that go beyond high-definition television (HDTV) have converged in the field of “4K” and “8K” imaging systems. The 4K imaging systems are used for digital cinema, while the 8K systems have been developed for use in next-generation TV broadcasting systems. The latter at 60 frames/s represents the highest pixel count and frame rate of any system, which includes their transmission design. In this paper, we will present an overview of two “8K” camera systems. One achieves a full resolution of 8K using three 33-Mpixel image sensors. The other is a more compact and practical camera system that uses four 8-Mpixel image sensors. We will also describe the camera functions, evaluation results, and views for future developments. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Ultrahigh-Definition LCOS Projectors

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 89 - 98
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3154 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Japan Broadcasting Corporation (NHK) promotes research and development of Super Hi-Vision (SHV), an ultrahigh-definition TV system with 16 times the number of pixels of HDTV and with a 22.2 multichannel sound system. So far, three types of SHV displays have been developed, using liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCOS) projection technologies. The three types are the pixel-offset method, the dual-modulation method, and the three-panel type. Development of these displays is described in detail in this paper. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Ultrahigh-Resolution Panoramic Imaging for Format-Agnostic Video Production

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 99 - 114
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2484 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    It is widely accepted that the emerging concept of immersive media is one of the key technologies for future entertainment. One feature of immersive media is to use large panoramic screens with ultrahigh resolution. This technology requires a completely new production grammar that is not necessarily compatible with conventional production formats. Against this background the paper describes a new approach called format-agnostic production that bridges the gap between different target formats and applications. It does not use fixed numbers of frames, lines and pixels, or even geometry. The philosophy is to merge video signals from different camera sensors with different spatio-temporal resolutions and dynamic ranges to a wide-angle panoramic view of the scene. Hence, to support a wide range of applications from mobile devices to immersive media, any desired shot framing and resolution can be obtained by scanning, panning, or zooming. Apart from a general description of the concept and the system architecture, the paper will mainly focus on technical details of ultrahigh-resolution panoramic imaging which plays a central role in the concept of format-agnostic production. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 115 - 129
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1628 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • High-Performance Video Codec for Super Hi-Vision

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 130 - 139
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1910 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To help pave the way for Super Hi-Vision (SHV) broadcasting, we have developed a new codec system that can encode and decode SHV signals in real time. This is the third generation of SHV real-time hardware codec. This efficient compression system maintains high picture quality by using eight 1080/60p (60 frames/s) encoding units and a video format converter with signal compensation processing that takes the properties of the Dual Green format of SHV into account. The video format converter divides an SHV image spatially into eight 1920 × 1080 portions, each of which is fed to the encoding unit. In the previous SHV codec, the SHV image was divided into 16 portions (spatially eight and temporally two) and 16 1080/30p encoding units were used. Compared with the previous system, the new codec achieves a 50% bitrate saving and downsizes the codec by almost half. Furthermore, several new technologies were developed and installed in the codec. We conducted the world's first SHV international transmission over an advanced Internet connection using the codec at a TS rate of 260 Mb/s. The received picture quality was good enough to show any kind of SHV content on a large screen. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Digital Cinema and Super-High-Definition Content Distribution on Optical High-Speed Networks

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 140 - 153
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2204 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Digital cinema is a promising application that utilizes high-speed optical networks to transfer super-high-definition (SHD) images. The networks are primarily used for distributing digital cinema contents in packet data form, and are also used to support new services such as the live streaming of musicals and sport games to movie theaters. While current transfer services offer high-definition (HD) quality video, live-streaming applications will soon shift to providing cinema quality 4K content to both business and movie theaters users. The extra-high-quality 4K format enables a realistic telepresence, and will be combined with special tools such as video editing systems to realize effective remote collaboration for business workspaces. This paper introduces successive research on SHD image transmission and its application, especially in digital cinema and associated application fields. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Progress of Transmission Technologies for UDTV

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 154 - 168
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3047 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the recent progress of research and development on transmission technologies for Super Hi-Vision (SHV), which is the form of ultrahigh-definition television (UHDTV) with the highest resolution class. The paper covers the transmission systems for SHV program production and satellite broadcasting. For short-haul transmission, an optical digital interface for video equipment was developed. It wavelength-multiplexes eight 10-Gb/s optical signals. It was experimentally confirmed that the transmission distance was at least 2 km, and that a series connection of the interfaces did not severely deteriorate jitter performance. We are also developing a 120-GHz-band wireless contribution short-haul link consisting of three transmitter/receiver pairs. All three pairs transmit and receive a 10.3-Gb/s signal at the same frequency. Experiments showed that transmission with little crosstalk is possible over a distance of 1.25 km when the receiver spacing is 8 m. A long-haul optical contribution link that we developed can transmit a 24-Gb/s SHV signal over a distance of 260 km by using optical amplifiers and no electronic repeaters. An IP network would be a good choice for long-distance links such as an international live contribution link. Several live IP transmissions of compressed video were conducted. Satellite relay transmission and broadcasting technology is also being developed. In particular, we have developed a QPSK/8PSK wide-band modem that uses LDPC and BCH codes. The modem could transmit 251-Mb/s (QPSK) and 677-Mb/s (8PSK) signals and was used in a live SHV satellite-transmission experiment. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Stereographic Digital Cinema: Production and Exhibition Techniques in 2012

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 169 - 189
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (945 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The growth in digital, stereographic motion pictures has been surprising and strong, providing a new revenue generator for the industry. After a sluggish start for the digital cinema industry, 3-D movies have become the primary driver of digital cinema adoption. Those experienced in digital stereographic techniques are clamoring for more tools and capabilities to support their creative visions. Meanwhile, the large industry of movie production workers is clamoring for information on the basic methods of creating and presenting stereographic movies. This paper presents the techniques and tradeoffs in employing 3-D camera capture, 3-D computer generated imagery, and 2-D-to-3-D conversion in developing stereographic images. It further reviews the current status and future possibilities for 3-D viewing systems in the exhibition cinemas. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Three-Dimensional Imaging for Creating Real-World-Like Environments

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 190 - 205
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1369 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Three-dimensional imaging is still not in the full commercial stage, but its application is widening due to its capability of creating real-world-like environments. This capability is especially important in realizing reality communication and telepresence operations in medical and unreachable places. For these applications, technologies for interacting with objects in the 3-D image should also be developed. The widespread use of 3-D images is expected in near future, but before that, problems of minimizing physical stresses, especially eye fatigue, should be solved for 3-D imaging. Currently, expected solutions to the problems are electroholography and super multiview methods. These two methods work at different principles, but they both can provide the continuous parallax as in the real-world scenes/objects. Electroholography can also provide focusable depth information to the viewers, though its viewing zone angle is limited. For the super multiview, it is not apparent that it can provide the focusable depth information, but it can provide more comfortable viewing condition than the holography because of its wider viewing zone angle. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Rise & Fall of Electric Vehicles in 1828–1930: Lessons Learned [Scanning Our Past]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 206 - 212
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1023 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Future Special Issues/Special Sections of the Proceedings

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 213 - 214
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (114 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Open Access

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 215
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1156 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Xplore Digital Library

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 216
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1346 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Global History Network [advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (422 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Back cover - Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): C4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (473 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The most highly-cited general interest journal in electrical engineering and computer science, the Proceedings is the best way to stay informed on an exemplary range of topics.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
H. Joel Trussell
North Carolina State University