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Issue 5 • Date May 1987

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 48
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): c1
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  • [Front inside cover]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): c2
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  • [Advertisements]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):1 - 2
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  • News log

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):3 - 4
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  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 5
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  • [Advertisements]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):6 - 9
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  • Management power [Reflections]

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 10
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  • Forum

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):11 - 12
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  • Book reviews

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):13 - 17
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  • Technically speaking

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):18 - 19
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    Glom that together. According to reports from the West Coast, CD ROM-speak is pervading the conversations of even civilized engineers. It is becoming the lingo of those who spend an inordinate amount of time spinning their compact disks. View full abstract»

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  • Whatever happened to project tinkertoy?

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):20 - 21
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    It was code-named Project Tinker-toy because it somewhat resembled those children's wooden construction sets. But this was no mere plaything. It was, in the early 1950s, a manufacturing first: what the National Bureau of Standards called mechanized production — the almost 100 percent automatic manufacture of electronic parts and subassemblies. View full abstract»

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  • Spin-offs

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):22 - 23
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    When motor-nerve fibers are severed or crushed because of injury, signals from the brain cannot get through and the muscle controlled by the nerve cannot function. But if the gap in the nerve is bridged, some function may be restored. View full abstract»

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  • Managing technology

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 24
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    When research and development managers form a project group they should try to make it cohesive. Not just because its members will enjoy life more (they will), but because, as Robert T. Keller has found, they are more likely to do high-quality work on schedule and within budget. (Academy of Management Journal, December, 1986, p. 715). View full abstract»

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  • Spectral lines

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):25 - 26
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    What has happened to the design “guru”? Didn't every design and development engineering department once have one? View full abstract»

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  • Special report: On good design

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):27 - 28
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    What do McDonnell Douglas's MD-80 jetliner, IBM's Proprinter for personal computers, Digital Equipment Corp.'s VAX computers, and Sony's D-5 miniature compact disk player have in common? All embody principles of good design. View full abstract»

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  • Part I. Defining the product: Product planners assess users' needs: Designers of commercial military, and consumer systems rely on the customer more than ever to help set design parameters

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):29 - 30
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    Before product planners and engineers can team up to design new products or change existing ones, they must do their homework. To avoid a product that will quickly become obsolete, or one that simply is not wanted in the first place, they need to check the findings of market research. View full abstract»

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  • Case study: VAX: Offshoot of a sturdy family tree

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 30
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    Designed more than a decade ago, the Digital Equipment Corp. VAX is one of the longest-lived major computer lines in the industry. Only IBM's 360 architecture, first plotted in 1963, is older and perhaps more popular. The VAX family covers a much wider performance range than any other — from the 725, which handles half a million instructions per second, to the 8978, at 50 million instructio... View full abstract»

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  • Case study: PCjr: Misreading the market

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):30 - 31
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    IBM's hugely successful line of personal computers suffered its first major failure in the PCjr. Before it was introduced late in 1983, the PCjr — code-named “Peanut” — was widely expected to support IBM domination of the home-computer market, much as the company already ruled the businesscomputer market. View full abstract»

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  • Case study: Cordless drill: Rejuvenating a product

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 32
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    He had asked her to leave the porch light on, but she hadn't. Now he would have to return tomorrow to do the job. The contractor, who was to install storm windows on the woman's house while she was away, had nowhere to plug in his electric drill; he had planned to insert a plug receptacle into the porch light fixture, but with the power switch inside the house turned off, this would be futile. View full abstract»

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  • Part II. Optimizing the design: How and when to make tradeoffs: Aircraft must be lighter, consumer products more functional implantable devices more reliable — But at what cost?

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):33 - 35
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    Designers seeking an optimal product would do well to keep in mind William Strunk's dictum on writing in The Elements of Style: omit needless words. In the same vein, any component that is not needed (or is more capable than necessary) generally costs more to buy, adds weight, occupies extra space, takes more time to assemble, increases the chance of failure, and costs more to maintain. Optimal de... View full abstract»

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  • Case study: JVC videomovie: Compact and lightweight

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):35 - 39
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    Reducing the weight and size of an already lightweight (2.1-kilogram) video-camera with recorder and playback while keeping it compatible with the highly popular VHS format was no small goal. Yet product planners and engineers with the Victor Co. of Japan (JVC) decided they wanted to take a crack at it. The result: the compact GR-C7 VideoMovie, measuring only 121 by 165 by 233 millimeters and weig... View full abstract»

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  • Defensive designs minimize hazards: To prevent customer injuries and avoid lawsuits, engineers must anticipate bizarre or unexpected ways in which products might be misused

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):39 - 40
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    Liability is one of the biggest issues that design engineers and manufacturing companies face, assert several lawyers. “If you're going to come out with a brand new product that does something unfamiliar, and offer it to a mass market and it has some hazard, then you are going to pay liability claims,” declared Peter W. Huber, a senior associate with Science Concepts Inc. in Washingt... View full abstract»

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  • Motto for specialists: Give some, get some: Parallel development of products and their manufacturing processes, within ever shorter lead times, is a formidable challenge for both designers and management

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s): 41
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    In its planning for the Taurus automobile, the Ford Motor Co. threw out the traditional, so-called over-the-transom process of product design. Instead, the company introduced at its Atlanta, Ga., plant a program team approach, where representatives from planning, design, engineering, and manufacturing all chipped in from the very beginning — five years before what is now the fastest selling... View full abstract»

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  • The designer's designer

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):42 - 44
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    When engineers on Apple Computer Inc.'s productdevelopment teams run into technical problems they can't solve, they take their troubles to the company's Advanced Technology Group. When engineers in the Advanced Technology Group have a problem that's beyond them, they go to Donald N. North. View full abstract»

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  • Case study: Miniature compact disk players: Help from the factory

    Publication Year: 1987, Page(s):44 - 46
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    Among compact disk players, the Sony D-50 was a trailblazer. It was the first to combine digital, high-quality sound with the carrying convenience that consumers expected in radios and tape players. View full abstract»

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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Susan Hassler
IEEE Spectrum Magazine