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American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Part II: Applications and Industry, Transactions of the

Issue 3 • Date July 1959

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Displaying Results 1 - 7 of 7
  • Limit-cycle stability study of a feedback control system by a new describing-function technique

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 129 - 134
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    A NEW describing-function technique is used in this paper to show the effects of several gain-controlling nonlinearities on the limit-cycle stability of an aircraft roll-stabilization system. The new method leads to a stability diagram which is divided not into the usual two regions of ¿stable¿ and ¿unstable¿ operation but rather into numerous regions each of which is associated with a particular type of limit-cycle oscillation or singular point. Such a diagram gives considerable insight into the mechanism of oscillations often observed in physical equipment. Very satisfactory agreement with analog computer studies is demonstrated for the new technique. View full abstract»

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  • New methods of simplifying Boolean functions

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 134 - 143
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    ECONOMY IS ONE of the most important considerations in the design of any system. Maximum savings can be achieved in the design of switching circuits by performing the desired logic in the simplest minimum form applicable to the equipment utilized. Boolean algebra is often used to express the functions of switching circuits and these Boolean expressions generally appear in the final form of a sum of products or a product of sums. The form that presents the most economical application is determined by the equipment. It is therefore necessary to be able to transform and simplify Boolean functions so that they will appear in the predetermined form that will yield the maximum savings. View full abstract»

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  • A stability criterion for nonlinear systems

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 144 - 148
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    IN ANOTHER PAPER1 Wolf reports on the recurrence relations in the solution of a certain class of nonlinear systems. In Wolf's dissertation2 a mathematical theory for the analysis of a class of nonlinear systems has been developed. This paper reports on a stability criterion based on the aforementioned dissertation and its application to nonlinear as well as linear feedback control systems. View full abstract»

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  • Notes on bridged-T complex conjugate compensation and 4-terminal network loading

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 148 - 163
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    MANY servo systems possess open-loop transfer functions which contain one or more pairs of complex conjugate poles. Often a pair of these complex conjugate poles will lie close to the imaginary axis and will cause the uncompensated system to possess a relatively poor damping ratio or damping exponent. Usually, satisfactory compensation of such systems can be achieved through the use of tachometer feedback or the conventional compensators possessing real axis singularities. However, there are occasions when complex conjugate singularity compensation would possess distinct advantages. This is particularly true if the compensating complex singularities can be introduced by a simple R-C (resistance-capacitance) passive network with zero d-c attenuation. View full abstract»

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  • Probabilistic error as a measure of control-system performance

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 163 - 168
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    AUTOMATIC FEEDBACK-control system synthesis occupies a rather unique place among the various fields of engineering due to the indirectness of its approach. An antenna will be designed for a certain radiation pattern because this radiation pattern is called for in the intended application. On the other hand, a servomechanism which is destined to handle step inputs exclusively may be synthesized by the techniques of Nyquist, Nichols, or Bode. This means that the system is actually designed for a frequency response: to exhibit certain resonance characteristics when subjected to steady-state sinusoidal inputs of varying frequency. Yet the system will never be subjected to this latter type of input. The justification of this approach is that the experience of the designer provides the basis for expecting that the system will perform properly in its actual input environment if it is built for a specific frequency response. Such examples of indirectness could be enumerated almost endlessly. View full abstract»

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  • Modern systems of traffic control as applied to the Seaboard Air line Railroad company

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 168 - 172
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    ON december 6, 1941, the Seaboard Air Line Railroad placed in service the first segment of a major installation of a system of traffic control on its line. The segment was only 33 miles in length but it made history. It was a portion of a 65-mile segment of railroad to be electrically controlled from a remote location 157 miles from the most distant point. At that time this line became the longest control line for this type of service in the world. The system proved to be very efficient and economical, and expansion of the system was made as rapidly as material and labor could be obtained. As of today, trains operate the entire distance between Richmond and Miami ¿ Tampa by signal indication controlled by modern systems of traffic control. View full abstract»

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  • Traffic control for railroads

    Publication Year: 1959 , Page(s): 173 - 176
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    THE HISTORY of the United States shows in some degree a direct relationship between the country's progress and the building of the railroads. One of the railroads' most outstanding achievements was the phenomenal manner in which they handled more than 90% of all personnel and materials that were moved for military purposes during World War II. One objective of this paper is to show how the centrallized traffic-control system helped the railroads achieve this outstanding performance. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Transaction ceased production in 1963. The current retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications.

Full Aims & Scope