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American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Part II: Applications and Industry, Transactions of the

Issue 3 • Date July 1955

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • A method for the preliminary synthesis of a complex multiloop control system

    Page(s): 129 - 134
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    COMPLEX multiloop control systems may be synthesized by several different methods. The choice of synthesis procedure depends upon the configuration of the multiloop system. Fig. 1 shows a complex multiloop control system which has been reduced to several closed-loop within closed-loop systems. The synthesis of such a system can be performed by a straightforward application of the frequency response method. View full abstract»

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  • A general theory for determination of the stability of linear lumped-parameter multiple-loop servomechanisms (and other feedback systems)

    Page(s): 134 - 147
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    THE main purpose of this paper is to set out the details of a general theory enabling direct determination of the stability of linear lumped-parameter multiple-loop servomechanisms (and other feedback systems) which is broader in scope, more direct in application, more powerful in use, and yields greater insight to the physical functioning of both the system as an entity and its subloops than does presently available theory. View full abstract»

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  • Ignitron multiple-unit cars for the New Haven Railroad

    Page(s): 147 - 152
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    ON APRIL 1, 1954, a 10-car train was placed in commuter service on the electrified lines of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, the first of 100 new multiple-unit cars. Modern in every respect, the outstanding feature is the use of ignitron rectifiers to convert alternating current collected from the trolley to direct current for operation of d-c traction motors. This is the first application in the world of this type of equipment in quantity. Its use follows naturally from the excellent results obtained with the ignitron rectifier type of motive power on a trial multiple-unit car in service on the Pennsylvania Railroad since 1949, followed by two locomotives which have been in operation on the same railroad since early 1952. These locomotives were nominally rated at 6,000 horsepower (hp), but have been operating at 8,400 hp each. View full abstract»

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  • Conditional feedback systems ¿ A new approach to feedback control

    Page(s): 152 - 161
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    In the classical single-loop feedback system, feedback acts not only to modify the influence of disturbances but also to determine the basic character of the input-output response. The inherently close association of these two effects has been a constant trial for designers and students since the inception of classical feedback, and has usually required that design requirements be compromised. Basically new configurations for feedback systems are introduced in which these effects of feedback are separated. In the new systems, feedback acts solely to reduce the influence of disturbances and thus to determine the response of the system to external loads and internal parameter variations. The character of the input-output response is independent of transmission around the feedback loop. The term ¿conditional feedback¿ has been introduced to distinguish the limited role that feedback plays in these new systems as compared with the classical system. Conditional feedback systems permit requirements on input-output response and on disturbance-output response to be met independently and offer a broad new range of performance characteristics for both linear and nonlinear systems in which there is substantial energy storage. View full abstract»

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  • Design of control systems for minimum bandwidth

    Page(s): 161 - 168
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    This paper presents a method of designing feedback control systems which minimizes bandwidth for a specified transient error. Reduction of bandwidth is desired in order to attenuate noise, simplify the compensation, and ease the requirements on components operating at high power levels. View full abstract»

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  • Considerations in the development of a high-power rectifier locomotive

    Page(s): 169 - 176
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    HIGH-POWER rectifier locomotive design considerations center, first and foremost, around the traction motor. To compensate for the cost of the rectifier equipment, the d-c traction motor must be of a design that enjoys high production and consequent low cost. To be competitive in road performance with contemporary locomotives powered by modern 25-cycle a-c commutator motors, which have the inherent ability to deliver high power at high speeds, the motor selected for the rectifier locomotive must have comparable characteristics. The peak outputs required per motor for short periods on a passenger locomotive are around 1,500 horsepower. It is the ability to deliver power of this magnitude per axle that permits the modern straight electric locomotive to maintain the high-speed schedules that characterize electrified railroads along the Eastern seaboard. In high-speed passenger service it is desirable that the rectifier locomotive be able to duplicate or exceed the performance of present locomotives equipped with 25-cycle commutator motors. View full abstract»

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  • Considerations in applying D-C traction motors on rectified single-phase power

    Page(s): 176 - 179
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    IN PAST years various attempts have been made to power locomotives by 25-cycle single-phase rectified voltage applied to d-c series motors. Early efforts were unsuccessful, mainly because of the faulty operation of the mercury-arc rectifier. Continued research and development, however, have now made the operation of d-c traction motors on mercury-arc rectifiers in locomotive service entirely feasible from a technical standpoint. In recent years, a new feature has been added. The development of the Diesel-electric locomotive has resulted in a standardized, low-cost d-c traction motor suitable for general-purpose road-locomotive applications. Hence, any present-day electric locomotive design employing d-c traction motors can benefit by the use of such standarized motors. An example of this is found in the rectifier locomotives recently built by the General Electric Company for the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad wherein the standard d-c traction motor shown in Fig. 1 was applied. The problem of operating these motors on rectified single-phase 25-cycle power resolved itself into the problem of smoothing the undulating current to a sufficient degree so that this motor would not be harmfully affected from either a stress or performance standpoint. View full abstract»

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  • A new power supply for railway cars

    Page(s): 179 - 183
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    THE usual d-c power supply for railway cars consists basically of a battery to which the car load is connected, a d-c generator, and a means of controlling the generator and connecting it to the load. During the last 15 years, a successful system has been established in the general range of 20 to 40 kw. The rotating equipment is a motor-generator set consisting of a d-c generator, a 3-phase 60-cycle 220-volt induction motor, and an armature reversing switch. While the car is in motion, this set is driven from a car axle through a drive unit and clutch. While the car is standing, the set is driven from wayside power through its induction motor. View full abstract»

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  • Rectifier locomotives for the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad

    Page(s): 183 - 189
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    IN DECEMBER 1954, delivery was begun on an order of ten rectifier-type locomotives for the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad. These are high-speed passenger locomotives operating over the Railroad's electrified line between New York City and New Haven. View full abstract»

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  • Graphic aids for calculating rectifier locomotive performance

    Page(s): 189 - 194
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    THE SUCCESS of any product is often determined by its ability to give customer satisfaction when operated under a wide range of conditions. All too often, these conditions differ appreciably from the specification upon which performance guarantees are based. To assure product satisfaction, the ability to project correctly the knowledge of product behavior from known to unknown regions is essential. View full abstract»

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  • An electric drive for rotary snowplows

    Page(s): 194 - 200
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    AS COMPLETE dieselization of the United States railroads approaches, the problem of replacing steam-powered rotary snowplows increases. Numerous designs have been tried in the past decade but thus far none has satisfactorily met all of the broad requirements. The electric drive here described features high reliability, over-all simplicity, standard interchangeable components, inherent stabilization, and adaptability. View full abstract»

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  • Residential electric space heating in detroit for 1952¿1953 heating season

    Page(s): 200 - 204
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    In this paper the load characteristics of 29 domestic electric space heating installations in Detroit during the 1952¿1953 heating season are given. The theoretical undercapacity of most of these installations are pointed out as well as the ineffectiveness of using the measurement of kilowatt-hours (kw-hr) per degree day per 1,000 cubic feet of heated space when comparing different houses. View full abstract»

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  • The new look in lamp bases

    Page(s): 205 - 208
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    THERE are many uses for aluminum in the lamp industry. For example, it is the reflecting coating on all lamps of the sealed beam type; it is used in some lamps as a powder for its beneficial effect on lamp performance, and in the manufacture of a heat-reflecting disk to reduce the base and socket temperatures in some lamp designs. But by far the largest amount of the material is employed in its newest use, the manufacture of bases. This paper is a discussion of data and tests on aluminum as it performs as a base-making material. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

This Transaction ceased production in 1963. The current retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications.

Full Aims & Scope