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IEEE Spectrum

Issue 5 • Date May 1986

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 32
  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):1 - 3
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  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s): 2
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  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s): 3
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  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):4 - 5
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  • Reflections

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):6 - 7
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  • Forum

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):8 - 13
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  • Book reviews

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):14 - 19
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  • Technically speaking

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):20 - 21
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1172 KB)

    This column is intended as a commentary on the current commotions in the English language, with particular emphasis on the usages of our own technical community. Because few who care about the language are neutral, it will probably be seen as a laudable effort, badly misinformed, stunningly correct, dead wrong, essential, or trivia! Comments, commendations, and condemnations will be accepted. Read... View full abstract»

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  • Spinoffs

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):22 - 25
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  • Whatever happened to

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):26 - 26I
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  • Best bits: Applications of microprocessors

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):28 - 29
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  • Managing technology

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):30 - 32
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  • Spectral lines

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s): 33
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  • Electric utilities: Poised for deregulation?: Competitive forces are an outgrowth of technical advances, regulatory constraints, and a slackening in the growth of demand

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):34 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3115 KB)

    It is noted that for years the industry was treated as a monopoly, to be regulated by state and Federal governments. Now that view is changing as cogeneration and the `wheeling' of power between utilities become major factors in the once sheltered industry. The role that the Public Utilities Regulatory Policy Act (PURPA) of 1978 has played in fostering competition is discussed. The changes that wo... View full abstract»

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  • 10 Steps to deregulation

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):40 - 43
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1571 KB)

    The author presents a plan of deregulation that has attracted the attention of the electric utility industry, both pro and con. The program has a logical progression that can be halted and restarted at any point as circumstances warrant. An abrupt and disruptive change in public policy and industry structure is not necessary. Although the 10 steps may overlap to some extent, each can be separately... View full abstract»

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  • Personal computers: Lessons learned

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):44 - 45
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    The authors survey the factors that have determined the success or failure of various PCs. The importance that consumers have attached to standard architectures is noted. However, it is pointed out that when hardware standards become established, manufacturers must push harder to differentiate their products from `clones'. It is argued that revolutionary advances in PC technology are not prompted ... View full abstract»

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  • Lessons learned: Classic debates aired first by mainframe developers, then by minicomputer makers are discovered anew by the PC industry

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):46 - 49
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1641 KB)

    After a decade of designing and building personal computers, manufacturers have learned some painful lessons that, in retrospect, should have been obvious. The idea that a design engineer knows exactly what users want, for example, has proved false, Flexibility in design and architecture has been the hallmark of successful PCs, although there are a few specialized markets where this does not apply... View full abstract»

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  • PC design: Architecture: Trading off technical innovation against the dependability of established standards is a principal consideration for PC designers

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):50 - 56
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3381 KB)

    The problems faced by all PC architectures are summarized. It is pointed out that in addition to market forces and technical constraints, PC manufacturers have to contend with the Federal Communications Commission, which can keep them out of the market altogether. Every personal computer sold in the United States must meet the FCC's radio-frequency emission standards. The single architectural deci... View full abstract»

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  • PC design: Manufacturing: Although relatively simple to assemble, PCs contain highly complex parts; manufacturing them is more akin to making consumer goods than computer products

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):56 - 61
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2827 KB)

    The authors note that a wide range of manufacturing approaches is possible because, unlike a mainframe or minicomputer, an entire PC can be assembled from as few as half a dozen major parts, all available off the shelf. With relatively few manufacturing operations, labor costs are critical, even if all assembly is done by hand. Standardized design of PC components has yielded further economies. Pa... View full abstract»

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  • Lessons learned: Challenges abound as designers tackle integrated software, artificial intelligence, and user-friendliness

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):62 - 64
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1238 KB)

    The importance of software in the microcomputer field is stressed. Advances in hardware have led to software improvements in three areas: power, functionality, and user assistance. The greater power of today's personal computer software is exhibited not only in performing its intended functions; designers of user-friendly software are also drawing on this power in an attempt to compensate for user... View full abstract»

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  • PC applications: Directions: In the offing is more intuitive, more useful software than today's versions, thanks to more powerful microprocessors

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):64 - 68
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2315 KB)

    It is pointed out that techniques adapted from artificial intelligence have already started to become commercially available. Researchers see software becoming more `trainable', able to access quantities of data that are orders of magnitude greater than today's and able to `intuit' some of the user's needs. The software will perform some of these tasks automatically while it monitors other functio... View full abstract»

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  • PC applications: Engineering: Only recently endowed with the power to do engineering chores, personal computers am already saving designers time and money

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):68 - 75
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3790 KB)

    The role of the personal computer in engineering and science laboratories, traditionally the realm of the most powerful state-of-the-art computers, is discussed. This trend was started by the introduction of the IBM PC AT in the summer of 1984. The machine is based on the 16-bit Intel 80286 microprocessor, which is more than twice as powerful as the 8088 microprocessor in the IBM PC. Engineers hav... View full abstract»

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  • Optical detectors: Three contenders: Depending on the application, the photoeonductor, p-i-n diode, or avalanche photodiode may prove the best choice

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):76 - 85
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4358 KB)

    Although there are many types of photodetectors, only three are commonly considered for the direct detection of digital signals in optical communications: the photoconductor, the p-i-n diode, and the avalanche photodiode. The advantages and disadvantages of each type are discussed. The problems of speed, security, and noise are stressed. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE awards: 1986 major medalists

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):86 - 87
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  • EEs' tools & toys

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):88 - 91
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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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Susan Hassler
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