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IEEE Spectrum

Issue 5 • Date May 1985

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 43
  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):1 - 3
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  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 2
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  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 3
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  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):4 - 5
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  • Forum

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):6 - 7
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  • Book reviews

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):8 - 15
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  • Reflections

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s): 16
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  • Technically speaking

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):17 - 19
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2761 KB)

    This column is intended as a commentary on the current commotions in the English language, with particular emphasis on the usages of our own technical community. Because few who care about the language are neutral, it will probably be seen as a laudable effort, badly misinformed, stunningly correct, dead wrong, essential, or trivia! Comments, commendations, and condemnations will be accepted. Read... View full abstract»

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  • Whatever happened to

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):20 - 23
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  • Spin-offs

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):24 - 25
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  • Best bits: Applications of microprocessors

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):26 - 29
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  • Managing technology

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):30 - 32
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  • Spectral lines: Behind the MX

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):33 - 34
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (464 KB)

    What is the purpose of the MX missile? How does it relate to the Strategic Defense Initiative (¿Star Wars¿)? How will it lead to a ban on all nuclear weapons? At the height of the President's campaign in March to force a favorable vote on the MX by Congress, a group of national magazine editors and publishers were invited to a White House briefing for the purpose ¿ at least in part ¿ of hearin... View full abstract»

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  • Special issue: The high-tech home

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):34 - 35
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1684 KB)

    Can you envision a house with 20 television monitors, 13 personal computers, a host of control, communications, and security systems, and its own local area network? How about a house that gets its heat from 400 feet below the ground, has walls and floors that store radiant heat during the day and release it at night, with windows that allow more heat to enter than escape? Such houses exist; you c... View full abstract»

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  • The superstructure: Designing for high-tech: The high-tech house is hardly passive; its heating, security, communications, and lighting systems function independently, yet talk with one another at the command of computers

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):36 - 40
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4383 KB)

    A description is given of a house in which the basic house systems, as well as individual items, are controlled by a personal computer with custom software. In designing a high-tech home, a decision must be made whether to use a personal computer or a dedicated home control unit (into which the basic systems and appliances are wired). The particular house described has an Apple II, which monitors ... View full abstract»

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  • Heating and cooling

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):40 - 43
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3613 KB)

    The high-tech house offers relief from summer heat not only by means of power-hungry air conditioners, but also through shade trees placed along the south side of the building. Heat in winter can come from a gas-fired furnace and also from warm air radiated from a solar mass beneath the floor. Smarter design and new technology are keeping the options open. View full abstract»

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  • Electronic watchdogs

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):43 - 46
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2031 KB)

    Enhanced by advances in microelectronics, the use of burglar-alarm systems for the home is on the rise in the United States. Home owners in suburbia and apartment dwellers in big cities are among the big users of burglar-alarm systems, and with electronic intelligence and control now offered at reasonable cost, other protective measures ¿ like fire detection and ¿panic buttons¿ to summon medica... View full abstract»

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  • C3I for the home owner

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):46 - 48
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    They look like giant lips, baseball bats, or cartoon characters. They remember phone numbers when you can't. They screen your phone calls, or tell you someone is breaking into your house. They respond to your verbal commands, they question the identity of callers or give them your forwarding number. They turn on your air conditioner or lights, or turn them off. They let you talk to your wife in th... View full abstract»

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  • Lighting sets the scene

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):48 - 50
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4942 KB)

    Lighting for the high-tech home is more than just screwing incandescent bulbs into ceiling fixtures and arranging floor lamps, desk lamps, and night lights. Instead, designed lighting ¿ the creation of different moods by changing the intensity, focus, and color of lights ¿ is becoming more and more widespread as people see what a difference it can make to their environment, explained John Kaufma... View full abstract»

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  • Robots in the home: Promises, promises: While great expectations are held for certain robot types, the robots for fun and educational purposes are limited in their adaptability to useful tasks

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):51 - 55
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (6480 KB)

    The three basic types of robotlike machines that are commercially available are described. It is pointed out that the true home robots available today consist essentially of personal computers on wheels, linked electromechanically to drive motors and usually some rudimentary sensor. They are about 0.6 to 1.3 meters (2 to 4 ft) tall and weigh 18 to 68 kilograms (40 to 150 lb). Like all personal com... View full abstract»

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  • Portia's perfect pad: Superhigh-tech: It may be too high-tech for some tastes, but an IEEE-member husband-and-wife team waits eagerly to move into this state-of-the-art Dallas showplace

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):56 - 63
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (7565 KB)

    A description is given of a high-tech home in which the various electronic technologies form an integrated environment. The home, which is near Dallas and is called FutureHome, has 13 computers, 16 telephones, more than 20 televisions, and a host of video and audio components, all linked with more than eight miles of wire. The security system, which is linked to the home control computer system, u... View full abstract»

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  • Impact 2000: A place in the sun: Sponsored by Boston Edison as an energy-conservation experiment, this home in the suburbs was seen during its construction by public-television viewers across the United States

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):64 - 68
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (6627 KB)

    The Impact 2000 house was built by the Boston Edison Co. to demonstrate to the public state-of-the-art energy technologies and conservation techniques. The roof of the house is a junior power station. It has two photovoltaic arrays, each containing 12 modules mounted on the rafters. Each module is 4 by 6 ft and has 432 photovoltaic cells. The maximum power output from the arrays is 4.3 kilowatts. ... View full abstract»

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  • Eaglecrest: A commuter's dream: Communication is everything in this high-tech aerie in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada; it is designed to permit the professional to work at home, far from the madding crowd

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):69 - 73
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (7222 KB)

    Eaglecrest is the name given to a community of 360 homes being built in Foresthill, California. The houses are being designed so as to permit telecommuting. To facilitate telecommuting, 12 main phone lines will be run into each home to a central box in the garage. From this box, other lines will fan out in sets of three to each of 10 locations in the house. Which three lines go to which location c... View full abstract»

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  • All the comforts of home

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):74 - 78
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    The advances which have been made in video and audio equipment are surveyed and a number of products are described. One of these is the CZ2094 television set from Toshiba Corp. in Tokyo, which will put two programs on the screen simultaneously. One picture, whether from a TV channel or a videocassette recorder, occupies one-quarter or one-sixteenth of the screen, depending on the viewer's selectio... View full abstract»

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  • Audio in the living room

    Publication Year: 1985, Page(s):78 - 80
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2586 KB)

    Compact disk (CD) players have strengthened what was formerly one of the weakest links of audio systems-the mechanical conversion of recorded sound into electric signals. They have almost none of the distortion produced by turntables and vinyl records. Digital information, in the form of small pits, is inscribed onto plastic disks and detected by laser. However, another weak link in audio systems-... View full abstract»

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IEEE Spectrum Magazine, the flagship publication of the IEEE, explores the development, applications and implications of new technologies.

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