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IEEE Spectrum

Issue 11 • Date Nov. 1983

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 41
  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):1 - 3
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  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s): 2
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  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s): 3
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  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):4 - 7
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  • Forum

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):8 - 15
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  • Book reviews

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):16 - 21
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  • Reflections

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):22 - 23
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  • Technically speaking

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):24 - 25
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    This column is intended as a commentary on the current commotions in the English language, with particular emphasis on the usages of our own technical community. Because few who care about the language are neutral, it will probably be seen as a laudable effort, badly misinformed, stunningly correct, dead wrong, essential, or trivia! Comments, commendations, and condemnations will be accepted. Read... View full abstract»

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  • Best bits: Applications of microprocessors

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):26 - 27
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  • Spin-offs

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):28 - 29
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  • Whatever happened to four-channel stereo?

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):30 - 32
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  • Spectral lines: Computers and society

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s): 33
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (342 KB)

    Computers are very garrulous and seem to be friendlier than they once were, but are they intelligent? Can they be trusted? View full abstract»

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  • Tomorrow's computers

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):34 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (823 KB)

    In April 1981 the Japanese government announced a long-range program to develop computing capabilities so advanced they would be of unrivaled usefulness in helping Japanese society prepare for the future. By the end of the decade or so, Japan proposed to extend the frontiers of computer science and engineering to the point where intelligent, superpowerful computers might be capable of serving as e... View full abstract»

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  • A new generation in computing: Microelectronics and artificial intelligence may produce advanced computers that are both fast and smart

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):36 - 41
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1435 KB)

    Major trends in computer development since World War II are briefly surveyed. Microelectronics, artificial intelligence, and computer systems and architecture are identified as the principal disciplines that will lead to a new generation of machines. Also discussed are limitations of present systems, exploiting parallelism through VLSI and multiprocessor architectures, and the current piecemeal ap... View full abstract»

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  • Needs and uses: Technology applied in research settings suggests that virtually everyone will use the new-generation computing systems

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):41 - 45
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1245 KB)

    The author explores the applications that will become possible with fifth-generation computers, and who the users of this new computing will be. All the applications rely on advances in three areas: integrated information-management systems, new computer architectures, and improved human-machine interfaces. They include industrial automation, office automation, science and engineering, aerospace, ... View full abstract»

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  • The teams and the playrs: Japan, the United States, and Western Europe provide striking contrasts in national interests and techniques: Strategies

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):45 - 46
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (501 KB)

    Strategies for development of fifth-generation computers in Japan, the United States, and Western Europe are compared and contrasted briefly in a short introductory article. Individual approaches are then explored in depth in a series of short articles. The discussion covers the activities of Japan's Institute for New Generation Computer Technology (ICOT); the Defense Advanced Research Project Age... View full abstract»

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  • Japan: The fifth generation: A quantum jump in friendliness

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):46 - 51
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    Japan's reputation for productivity and efficiency notwithstanding, the country is now suffering a severe productivity bottleneck in its service industries. Production costs and consumer prices in the labor-intensive service industries continue to rise sharply, even though the same costs and prices have risen only modestly in automobile manufacturing or have even decreased in electronics. An examp... View full abstract»

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  • The United States

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):51 - 69
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    Japan's fifth-generation computer effort may have caught the imagination of the popular press, but work leading to this next generation of computing in the United States has its roots in research conducted for 20 years. Artificial intelligence is one example. The quantity of research is considerable, but it has been scattered among some 40 universities and 30 major corporations. That piecemeal app... View full abstract»

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  • Great Britain

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):69 - 71
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    Great Britain's response to Japan's fifth-generation computer program will be a doubling of research in information technology through a new cooperative program funded by industry, by its Science and Engineering Research Council, its Department of Industry, and its Ministry of Defence. The effort will concentrate on four areas of research: very large-scale integration (VLSI), software engineering,... View full abstract»

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  • European common market

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):71 - 72
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (548 KB)

    Since the late 1970s the general position of European information-technology industries has worsened in the world market. Most European companies are financially weak compared with their Japanese and American competitors; their information-technology products are not yet a major source of profits. The result is a negative balance of trade for Europe in this sector. In addition, studies show a nega... View full abstract»

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  • Designing the next generation: Machines that are much faster, much smarter, and far more accessible than current ones require advances on a broad technological front

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):73 - 74
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    A brief examination is provided of the advances that will be required to provide the next generation of computers. In particular, parallel processing, VLSI, and software productivity are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • A day in the life of a new-generation computer user

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):74 - 75
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    This is a fictional account of how the next generation of computers might help a user on a typical day in 1993. All technologies mentioned have already been demonstrated as research prototypes; only the specific machines and situations are fictional projections. In the scenario, the user, John Atarashi, is an actuary working for a company that develops retirement benefit plans for client companies... View full abstract»

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  • Networks: Wiring a nation

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):74 - 75
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (628 KB)

    Fundamental to next-generation computing are networks through which computers can share each other's resources as thou'gh they were parts of the same machine. The computing power of all the computers on a next-generation network would be availableat any node In the network. Personal computers would be connected to local-area networks, and local networks would be interconnected in a nationwide supe... View full abstract»

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  • The building blocks: Artificial intelligence, software engineering, computer architecture, and very large-scale integration will play major roles: Artificial intelligence

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):77 - 91
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3667 KB)

    Major areas of artificial intelligence (AI) research as it impacts on next-generation computing are explored in five short, related articles. The first article provides an overview of the background and current goals of AI. The remaining four discuss, in turn: The codification of human knowledge for machine reading; helping computers understand natural languages; continuous speech recognition; and... View full abstract»

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  • Software engineering

    Publication Year: 1983, Page(s):91 - 94
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    The need for automation of software development is discussed in the context of next-generation computing. The lag in the use of available tools is pointed out. Rapid prototyping and the reuse of existing program components are two solutions discussed here. Finally, the elements needed for an effective integrated, automated programming environment are considered. View full abstract»

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