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IEEE Spectrum

Issue 10 • Date Oct. 1978

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 44
  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):1 - 2
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  • Contents

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s): 1
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  • [Advertisement]

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):2 - 8
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  • News from Washington

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s): 9
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  • Energy report

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s): 10
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  • Calendar

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):11 - 13
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  • Forum

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):14 - 19
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  • EEs' tools & toys

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):20 - 25
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  • Scanning the Institute

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s): 26
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  • Coming in Spectrum

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):26 - 30
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  • Spectral lines: Productivity: Its ups and downs

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s): 31
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (408 KB)

    Concern about productivity is universal among the highly developed nations of the world. Productivity in the United States, measured in the traditional way (value of goods and services divided by the hours of work required to produce them), rose only 1.6 percent per year, on average, from 1967 to the present, compared with 3.2 percent per year from 1946 to 1966. View full abstract»

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  • Introduction

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):32 - 33
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    Jobs are at stake, some say. Our very quality of life is in jeopardy. The speakers are no mere prophets of doom; their growing ranks include leaders of government, industry, and academia as well as social and physical scientists and, last but not least, engineers. The common target of their concern is productivity. View full abstract»

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  • Productivity I: Defining the game and the players

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s): 34
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    Who's worried about productivity? We all should be, if we're to believe IEEE Fellows J. Fred Bucy (p. 45), Jacob Rabinow (p. 48), and Jordan Baruch (p. 47). These three men operate in vastly different environments with equally diverse concerns. Dr. Bucy, as president of Texas Instruments, is a ¿captain of industry¿ Dr. Rabinow, chief research engineer at the National Engineering Laboratory for t... View full abstract»

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  • A call for focusing on productivity: It directly affects inflation, cost of living, job stability ¿¿ and the quality of life

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):34 - 39
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4293 KB)

    In a little noticed sentence in the 1978 Economic Report of the President of the United States, the U.S. Council of Economic Advisors states that the slowdown in productivity growth in the United States is ¿¿one of the most significant economic problems of recent years.¿¿ The slowdown affects almost every major issue facing U.S. citizens ¿¿ the U.S. trade balance, the expansion of inflation, the n... View full abstract»

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  • A minority report: Experts look at some of the assumptions used in traditional measures of productivity and probe productivity's impact

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):40 - 45
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3340 KB)

    The conventional wisdom about productivity generally consists, these days, of a lot of hand wringing about the terrible things that are about to occur because of the alleged decline in the rate of productivity growth. This point of view is well expressed by Edgar Weinberg in the previous article (p. 34), and will be taken up in detail throughout the rest of this issue. View full abstract»

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  • Exploding a few myths about productivity and presenting a formula for the future

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):45 - 47
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    There is ample evidence that in the past 17 years annual gains in productivity in the United States have lagged behind those of other advanced industrialized countries. Between 1960 and 1977, the U.S. could boast productivity increases of only 2.8 percent per year, compared with 5.7 percent for West Germany and 8.4 percent for Japan (Fig. 1). However, it should also be emphasized that the absolute... View full abstract»

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  • On stimulating productivity in the U.S.: The need to encourage innovation is broadly supported, and a program is sought

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):47 - 48
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1040 KB)

    Technological innovation is the application of the industrial arts and sciences, along with the human intellect, to change the way society creates its goods and services, or the very nature of those goods and services. Despite the fact that technological innovation can secure large benefits for society, and that small businesses secure those benefits out of all proportion to their size, the rate o... View full abstract»

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  • How to improve the U.S. patent system, and encourage the `middle level¿¿ inventor

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):48 - 50
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    An invention is both an artistic and an economic phenomenon. An elegant invention, like anything else that is elegant, is truly a form of art. But any invention is influenced by the technological and economic climate. View full abstract»

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  • How energy, and its cost, enter the `productivity equation¿¿

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):50 - 52
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    Energy use, economic growth, and average labor productivity are closely related to one another, and an analysis of these relationships in the United States shows that the next decade is Likely to be one of reduced rate of growth of labor productivity, accompanied by a lowered rate of economic growth. These reductions can be traced to the fourfold increase in petroleum prices in late 1973 and early... View full abstract»

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  • Productivity II: Electrotechnology to the rescue

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s): 53
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (447 KB)

    Discusses the impact of computers on production effectiveness, particular attention being given to the steel industry. Programming concepts available for implementing steel-mill automation are discussed and the problems of collecting massive amounts of data are outlined. The designer/computer interaction is examined concluding that human decision is still crucial. View full abstract»

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  • Computers are making giant strides in automating production ¿¿ but human decision making is still crucial

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):53 - 60
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4816 KB)

    In the 1960s, computers were considered by many as an infallible future way of boosting productivity, since they worked faster and had more memory than humans. View full abstract»

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  • Experts look ahead to the day of the full-blown computer-integrated automatic factory

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):60 - 66
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4791 KB)

    Discusses the future potential of the Computer Integrated Manufacturing System (CIMS) which represents an automatic computerized job-shop section. CIMS has the flexibility of a group of general-purpose machine tools, and is composed of several NC machine tools, integrated with materials-handling systems, to perform machining operations on randomly sequenced parts. All parts of the system normally ... View full abstract»

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  • Robots quietly take their place alongside humans on the production line to raise productivity-and do the `dirty work'

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):66 - 70
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Two important features of robots-versatility and the ability to learn are discussed. The suitability of robots in a wide range of industrial processes is illustrated with several examples, emphasising the unique role of robots in improving productivity in machine-tool loading and unloading. Future trends of robots and the impact of robotics on industrialised nations are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Techniques that optimize the use of the world's dwindling energy supply inevitably affect productivity as well

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s):70 - 73
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    Energy ¿ an inescapable input in all products and services ¿ is becoming scarcer and more expensive. Every fluctuation in availability and price affects the world economy, in general, and national productivity growth rates, in the specific. Just how to make the most ¿productive¿ use of energy resources is therefore a subject of great importance. View full abstract»

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  • Productivity III: Management to the rescue

    Publication Year: 1978, Page(s): 74
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    Despite some earlier analyses suggesting the contrary, management and labor have demonstrated time and again the validity of the old adage that where there is a will, there is a way ¿ in this case, to increase productivity. Behind the various strategies described in this section is the recognition that technological innovation, if it is to be completely successful, must be nurtured and protected ... View full abstract»

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