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IEE Review

Issue 6 • Date 18 Nov 1993

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Clearing the picture-digital television

    Page(s): 253 - 256
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (328 KB)  

    Digital techniques are already synonymous with quality in sound reproduction, but before television broadcasting can similarly benefit a range of complex issues will have to be resolved. Here the author outlines how a great deal of research effort, particularly in Europe and the USA, has recently gone into investigating the possible use of digital techniques throughout the complete TV broadcasting chain, from studio to the viewer's home. Although many technical issues remain to be resolved, there is now a common expectation that future broadcasting systems will be digitally based View full abstract»

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  • Changing the face of flat displays-the ferroelectric LCD

    Page(s): 249 - 252
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (444 KB)  

    For years, the electronics industry has been searching for the ideal flat display. Much of the research effort has concentrated on the family of technologies known collectively as liquid crystal displays (LCD). Here, the authors review the ferroelectric LCD, a new generation device with distinctive advantages over competing technologies View full abstract»

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  • Reality-who needs it?

    Page(s): 243 - 246
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (348 KB)  

    The extravagant early promises of virtual reality used in the leisure industry have put off many potential users. But the image of VR is changing almost as fast as the technology. The author describes how, in the UK, Salford-based Advanced Robotics Research Ltd. has been spearheading efforts to draw the attention of British industry to the future gains to be made by adopting VR as the human-machine interface technology for the next century. The project, called VRS (Virtual Reality & Simulation), initially planned as a 2 year programme of work, is aimed not only at keeping British industry abreast of significant international developments in the field, but also at demonstrating to participating companies the commercial value of VR. At the end of the programme, VRS will provide the participating companies with sufficient knowhow to introduce the technologies into their own businesses with minimal technical and financial risk View full abstract»

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  • Power on the move

    Page(s): 13 - 14 supl.
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (124 KB)  

    The author describes how rechargeable batteries are taking off. Demand is rising in three specific areas, known in the trade as the `3 Cs': camcorders, computers and communications. Market research confirms that these applications are set to do for rechargeable batteries what the portable stereo did for conventional ones. By the turn of the century, these devices will be major contributors to battery usage. The author also outlines how the next generation of rechargeable batteries may be the first to benefit from standardised packs for the fastest growing applications View full abstract»

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  • I'll be seeing you [telecommunications services]

    Page(s): 235 - 238
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (260 KB)  

    The face of telecommunications services for the future is taking shape now. Here, the author predicts that although the development of telecommunications has not been slow, the rapid advance of key technologies, along with increasing competition, will produce conditions in future years closer to revolution than evolution. Market opportunities will be huge and the impact all-pervasive. Besides the obvious benefits for the IT industry, an intelligent broadband network could bring major benefits to all aspects of the UK economy View full abstract»

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  • Lasting quality [TQM]

    Page(s): 269 - 271
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (224 KB)  

    The author examines whether `total quality management' is just another passing `buzz-word' or a real management philosophy with benefits for the user. Cynics have dismissed `total quality' as the latest in a long line of management fads. However, the author argues that those companies that have embraced TQM have seen very real and lasting benefits View full abstract»

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  • Creativity and discipline-quality management in software

    Page(s): 263 - 265
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (212 KB)  

    Like most products, software is occasionally produced by the people who need it, but more often it is bought in from a specialist supplier. In this case, quality is of vital importance to the customer. Here, the author describes how software development, which is essentially a creative engineering process based on an unrestrained flow of ideas, can be controlled, captured and reproduced View full abstract»

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  • UPS and downs

    Page(s): 3 - 5 supl.
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (252 KB)  

    The latest annual report on distribution and transmission system performance from the Office of Electricity Regulation presents a reasonably cheerful picture to the electricity consumer in general. But it also throws into sharper focus the risks that businesses run if they fail to provide uninterruptible power support for their computer installations. The author describes how, nevertheless, many companies still run that risk. Many computer systems are more vulnerable to power-related problems now than ever before. If ever there was a time for companies to look at their power back-up strategy, it is now View full abstract»

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  • Positive charging-health checks for batteries

    Page(s): 9 - 10 supl.
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (164 KB)  

    During the 1980s, seduced by the claims of zero maintenance, nondedicated space requirements and a design life of 10 years, more and more users of emergency power supplies switched over from traditional flooded electrolyte standby batteries to a sealed configuration. Reports from both the UK and the USA, confirmed by the author's own experience of investigating battery failures, demonstrate a significant discrepancy between actual service life and the 10 year design life previously quoted by many battery manufacturers. Here, the author describes new commercial techniques for testing UPS secondary cells which work by measuring battery impedance-or its inverse, conductivity-by imposing a pulse or alternating-current waveform and measuring the voltage response View full abstract»

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