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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 8 • Date Aug. 1986

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Dynamic file structure for partial match retrieval based on overflow bucket sharing

    Page(s): 801 - 810
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2097 KB)  

    A hashing-based dynamic file structure is introduced for partial match retrieval using overflow bucket sharing. The sharing of overflow buckets is dynamic in the sense that an overflow bucket is shared by a varying number of primary buckets according to the local conditions of the file. The use and sharing of overflow buckets defers splitting of the data buckets, thereby increasing the storage utilization. For the same reason, plus the fact that the sharing is dynamic, the growth of the directory is slowed down. Under the proposed organization, the records are stored more compactly in the data buckets, and for those partial match queries in which few attributes are specified, groups of neighboring directory entries have high probability of being referenced together, so that the retrieval costs for these types of partial match queries are reduced. This file organization is found to be space efficient and is also time efficient for queries in which the number of specified attributes is small. View full abstract»

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  • Error recovery in asynchronous systems

    Page(s): 811 - 826
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    A framework for the provision of fault tolerance in asynchronous systems is introduced. The proposal generalizes the form of simple recovery facilities supported by nested atomic actions in which the exception mechanisms only permit backward error recovery. It allows the construction of systems using both forward and backward error recovery and thus allows the exploitation of the complementary benefits of the two schemes. Backward recovery, forward recovery, and normal processing activities can occur concurrently within the organization proposed. Exception handling is generalized to provide a uniform basis for fault tolerance schemes with the atomic action structure. The generalization includes a resolution scheme for concurrently raised exceptions based on an exception tree and an abortion scheme that permits the termination of the internal atomic actions. An automatic resolution mechanism is outlined for exceptions in atomic actions which allows users to separate their recovery schemes from the details of the underlying algorithms. View full abstract»

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  • Mechanical verification and automatic implementation of communication protocols

    Page(s): 827 - 843
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    An automated technique for protocol development is discussed along with its application to the specification, verification, and semiautomatic implementation of an authentication protocol for computer networks. An overview is given of the specification language, implementation method, and software tools used with this technique. The authentication protocol is described, along with an example of its operation. The reachability analysis technique for the verification of some protocol properties is discussed, and protocol verification software that uses this technique is described. The results of mechanical verification of some properties of this protocol are presented with a partial implementation generated automatically from the protocol specification. View full abstract»

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  • Optimal allocation of file servers in a local network environment

    Page(s): 844 - 848
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1192 KB)  

    A globally optimal allocation for files in a local network environment is presented. The principal concern is the delays due to contention at the file servers; storage space is assumed to be adequate. A queuing network model is used to represent the file servers and the workstations. The workloads generated by the workstations are statistically identical. The model assumes that the communications medium is lightly loaded. In this case there is very little queuing, so that a message transmission requires an approximately constant average delay which can be included in the local processing time of the workstation. Under these assumptions the model can be applied to any of the various LAN technologies. It is shown that all the files of each workstation should be placed on one file server, with the workstations divided as equally as possible among the file servers. View full abstract»

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  • SODOS: A software documentation support environment — Its definition

    Page(s): 849 - 859
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    A description is given of the data abstraction mechanisms used in SODOS (software documentation support), a computerized system which supports the definition and manipulation of documents used in developing software. The generic definition of a document is given, the operations of consistency, completeness, and traceability are defined precisely, and it is shown how the generic document and associated operations are mapped onto the relational model. The SODOS system differs from others in that it is built on top of a database management system and an object-based model of the software life cycle. One advantage of this model is that it supports software documentation independently of any fixed methodology that the developers may be using. Another advantage of the system is that it permits traceability through all phases of the software life cycle, thus facilitating the testing and maintenance phases. The document representation is defined in terms of a graph model mapped into a relational data model. View full abstract»

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  • A formal method for composing a network command language

    Page(s): 860 - 865
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    A formal method is introduced for the development and definition of command languages for heterogeneous computer networks. The network command languages are developed from the command languages of the systems constituting the network. This is done by defining a common presentation model for the system command languages and constructing the network command language by applying a composition principle to the commonly represented languages. The common presentation model is defined as a Vienna Development Method (Meta IV) abstract processor for command languages. System command languages are represented by means of predicate functions which are defined on the abstract domains of the abstract processor. This allows a straightforward formulation of the composition principle as a function for the logical combination of predicate functions. Two sample network command languages are composed out of two hypothetical command languages. The results are related to the International Organization for Standardization Open Systems Interconnection model (ISO OSI). View full abstract»

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  • Dynamic analysis of the effects access rule modifications have upon security

    Page(s): 866 - 870
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    A technique is presented for analyzing the relationships among the predicates in a predicate-based security model for database management systems. The principal tool of the technique is the Boolean difference, which is used to examine the relationships among the predicates when users are allowed to be members of more than one user group. The effects of deleting or adding predicates on the user group definition are identified by the technique. The technique is most valuable to information security authorizers who define and maintain access-control rules. View full abstract»

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  • A comparison of computed chaining to predictors

    Page(s): 870 - 874
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    Computed chaining and predictors are two recent techniques for resolving hashing collisions which use a pseudolink field instead of an actual address link to group records which map to the same home address. With additional computation on the pseudolink, the actual address can be determined. The advantage of the pseudolink is that it often takes much less storage than an actual address would take. The authors note problems with the predictor method which must be overcome if the method is to be used successfully. They also compare the predictor method to computed chaining. They conclude with a discussion of the utility of multiple predictor, i.e. having more than one chain of pseudolinks for records with the same home address. View full abstract»

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  • Correction to “a rational design process: How and why to fake it”

    Page(s): 874
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (160 KB)  

    A careful reader, Max Stern of Teradata Corporation, has brought to our attention two errors in the above paper.1 On page 253 in the second paragraph under point 4) the text reads, “A purely digital or purely hybrid computer is a special case of this general module.” It should read, “A purely digital or purely analog computer is a special case of this general model.” View full abstract»

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  • Call for papers

    Page(s): 875 - 876
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org