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IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 7 • July 1986

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Displaying Results 1 - 9 of 9
  • Foreword

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s): 725
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Whether software engineering needs to be artificially intelligent

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):726 - 732
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1792 KB)

    The author discusses the roles that humans now play versus the roles that could be taken over by artificial intelligence in developing computer systems. Also discussed is how the intelligent part of the automatic system can communicate effectively with humans. Topics covered include an artificial intelligence overview; weak methods; the heuristic search; the problem space; the knowledge base; expe... View full abstract»

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  • Experimentation in software engineering

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):733 - 743
    Cited by:  Papers (56)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2972 KB)

    A framework is presented for analyzing most of the experimental work performed in software engineering over the past several years. The framework of experimentation consists of four categories corresponding to phases of the experimentation process: definition, planning, operation, and interpretation. A variety of experiments are described within the framework and their contribution to the software... View full abstract»

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  • Advances in software inspections

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):744 - 751
    Cited by:  Papers (139)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1700 KB)

    Software inspection is a method of static testing to verify that software meets its requirements. It engages the developers and others in a formal process of investigation that usually detects more defects in the product-and at lower cost-than does machine testing. Studies and experiences are presented which enhance the use of the inspection process and improve its contribution to development of d... View full abstract»

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  • Knowledge-based programming: A survey of program design and construction techniques

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):752 - 768
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4180 KB)

    An application of artificial intelligence (AI) to the development of software is presented for the construction of efficient implementations of programs from formal high-level specifications. Central to this discussion is the notion of program development by means of program transformation. Using this methodology, a formal specification is compiled (either manually or automatically) into an effici... View full abstract»

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  • Programming in the large

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):769 - 783
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3730 KB)

    It is asserted that ad-hoc programming techniques do not work in the development of big software systems. The programs faced in developing large software include starting from fuzzy and incomplete requirements; enforcing a methodology on the developers; coordinating multiple programmers and managers; achieving desired reliability and performance in the system; managing a multitude of resources in ... View full abstract»

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  • Specification of modular systems

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s):784 - 798
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2869 KB)

    A modularity concept for structuring large software systems is presented. The concept enforces an extreme modularity discipline that goes considerably beyond the one found in modern programming languages such as MODULA-2 or Ada. The concept is meant to be used to tightly control side effects in the execution of systems that are constructed of independently developed modules. A family of specificat... View full abstract»

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  • Call for papers

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s): 799
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Call for papers

    Publication Year: 1986, Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tse-eic@computer.org