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Software Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 6 • Date June 1986

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Editorial

    Page(s): 677
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Considerations on the insularity of performance evaluation

    Page(s): 678 - 683
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    It is argued that systems performance evaluation, in the first 20 years of its existence, has developed in substantial isolation from such disciplines as computer architecture, system organization, operating systems, and software engineering. The possible causes for this phenomenon, which seems to be unique in the history of engineering, are explored. Its positive and negative effects on computer science and technology, as well as on performance evaluation itself, are discussed. The drawbacks of isolated development outweigh its advantages. Thus, instructional and research initiatives to foster the rapid integration of the performance evaluation viewpoint into the mainstream of computer science and engineering are proposed. View full abstract»

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  • An approach to decentralized computer systems

    Page(s): 684 - 692
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    The technology for distributed computing is available. However, it is argued that decentralized systems will always require more careful design, planning, and management than their centralized counterparts. The rationale for and against decentralization is given, and a technical approach to decentralized systems is sketched. This approach contrasts with the popular concept of a distributed integrated database which transparently provides remote IO against single system image. Rather, it proposes that functions be distributed as `servers' which abstract data as high-level operations on objects and communicate with `requestors' via a standard message protocol. This requestor-server approach has the advantages of modularity and performance. View full abstract»

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  • Operational survivability in gracefully degrading distributed processing systems

    Page(s): 693 - 704
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    The use of experimental methods and statistical analysis techniques to study factors influencing operational survivability in gracefully degrading systems is investigated. Survivability data are generated using a statistically designed experiment in conjunction with a simulation model of network survivability. Thirty two factors having stable regression coefficients are used to identify ten regression models explaining survivability. Influential factors include the distributed system network, the application system, and the distribution policy. Nine factors are found in all models: the number of nodes in the distribution system, distributed system connectivity, module memory requirements, module-to-module interaction frequency, distribution policy, percent of nodes lost, initial assignment results, available processing capacity at the end of the subcase, and the interaction of all application-related variables. Models that are acceptable from both an estimation and prediction viewpoint are developed. Possible commercial and military applications are suggested. View full abstract»

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  • The last 10 percent

    Page(s): 705 - 712
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    Following a brief summary of the background and goals of developments in software engineering, some of the major thrusts in the future of program development and maintenance are discussed. Various national level software initiatives are discussed in this context. This is not a comparative survey of their plans and activities. The central issues addressed relate to the understandability of programming, the reuse of software, and the general problem of working with and improving a program that is already almost the one desired. This is the phase of the process after the system is `90% done', hence the emphasis on the `last 10 percent'. View full abstract»

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  • A survey of software design techniques

    Page(s): 713 - 721
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    Software design is the process which translates requirements into a detailed design representation of a software system. It is argued that good software design is the key to reliable and understandable software. Important techniques for software design, including architectural and detailed design stages, are surveyed. Recent advances in distributed software system design methodologies are also reviewed. To ensure software quality, various design verification and validation techniques are discussed. In addition, current software metrics and error-resistant software design methodologies are considered. Future research in software design is considered. View full abstract»

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  • Call for papers

    Page(s): 722 - 723
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Call for papers

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tseeicdwyer@computer.org