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IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering

Issue 3 • Sept. 1975

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1975, Page(s): 1
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  • [Inside front cover]

    Publication Year: 1975, Page(s): c2
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  • Editor's notice

    Publication Year: 1975, Page(s): 261
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  • A methodology for software engineering

    Publication Year: 1975, Page(s):262 - 270
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (767 KB)

    The paper presents a methodology for software engineering. This methodology recognizes the existence of two separate and distinctive phases (architecture and implementation) of a software engineering task. These two phases are interfaced by a formalized but descriptive design specification described by a language called ADL (architectural design language). This ADL description would serve a simila... View full abstract»

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  • Property extraction in well-founded property sets

    Publication Year: 1975, Page(s):270 - 285
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1507 KB)

    To carry out significant program optimization, it is necessary to know what properties hold at each program unit. Frequently the properties of interest form a partially ordered set with a minimum condition (i.e., well-founded). When this occurs, it is possible to directly compute the properties that can be attached to program units and, optionally, to expand the program text to obtain a strong ass... View full abstract»

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  • Program graphs, an algebra, and their implication for programming

    Publication Year: 1975, Page(s):286 - 291
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (520 KB)

    Program graphs have been used as a vehicle to focus attention on the structure of a program. A systematic methodology for partitioning a program graph (digraph) to highlight the relationships between program elements is introduced along with an attendant notation. This notation is described in purely mathematical terms in the first section, and then the programming-related implications of this app... View full abstract»

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  • Random insertion into a priority queue structure

    Publication Year: 1975, Page(s):292 - 298
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (874 KB)

    The average number of levels that a new element moves up when inserted into a heap is investigated. Two probabilistic models under which such an average might be computed are proposed. A `Lemma of Conservation of Ignorance' is formulated and used in the derivation of an exact formula for the average in one of these models. It is shown that this average is bounded by a constant and its asymptotic b... View full abstract»

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  • A computer network monitoring system

    Publication Year: 1975, Page(s):299 - 311
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1001 KB)

    In order to help satisfy an apparent need for tools for monitoring the activities of a computer network, a system of special hardware and software, called a Computer Network Monitoring System (CNMS) is being implemented in the University of Waterloo Computer Communications Networks Group (CCNG). The paper discusses the motivation and derivation of the CNMS, then provides functional descriptions of... View full abstract»

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  • A theory of software reliability and its application

    Publication Year: 1975, Page(s):312 - 327
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (11028 KB)

    The theory permits the estimation, in advance of a project, of the amount of testing in terms of execution time required to achieve a specified reliability goal [stated as a mean time to failure (MTTF)]. Execution time can then be related to calendar time, permitting a schedule to be developed. Estimates of execution time and calendar time remaining until the reliability goal is attained can be co... View full abstract»

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  • Introducing iteration into the Pure Lisp theorem prover

    Publication Year: 1975, Page(s):328 - 338
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (943 KB)

    It is shown how the Lisp iterative primitives PROG, SETQ, GO, and RETURN may be introduced into the Boyer-Moore method for automatically verifying Pure Lisp programs. This is done by extending some of the previously described heuristics for dealing with recursive functions. The resulting verification procedure uses structural induction to handle both recursion and iteration. The procedure does not... View full abstract»

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  • Strong verification of programs

    Publication Year: 1975, Page(s):339 - 346
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (639 KB)

    The authors investigate the strong verification of programs using the concept of predicate transformer introduced by Dijkstra (1974). They show that every do-while program has a loop invariant that is both necessary and sufficient proving strong verification. This loop invariant is shown to be the least fixpoint of a recursive function mapping predicates to predicates that is defined by the progra... View full abstract»

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  • [Back matter]

    Publication Year: 1975, Page(s):1 - 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering is interested in well-defined theoretical results and empirical studies that have potential impact on the construction, analysis, or management of software. The scope of this Transactions ranges from the mechanisms through the development of principles to the application of those principles to specific environments. Specific topic areas include: a) development and maintenance methods and models, e.g., techniques and principles for the specification, design, and implementation of software systems, including notations and process models; b) assessment methods, e.g., software tests and validation, reliability models, test and diagnosis procedures, software redundancy and design for error control, and the measurements and evaluation of various aspects of the process and product; c) software project management, e.g., productivity factors, cost models, schedule and organizational issues, standards; d) tools and environments, e.g., specific tools, integrated tool environments including the associated architectures, databases, and parallel and distributed processing issues; e) system issues, e.g., hardware-software trade-off; and f) state-of-the-art surveys that provide a synthesis and comprehensive review of the historical development of one particular area of interest.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Matthew B. Dwyer
Dept. Computer Science and Engineering
256 Avery Hall
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0115 USA
tse-eic@computer.org