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Intelligent Transportation Systems, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 2012

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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): C1 - C4
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  • IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems publication information

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): C2
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  • Introduction to the Special Issue on the 2011 Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 989 - 993
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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  • Design and Experimental Validation of a Cooperative Driving System in the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 994 - 1007
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2037 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we present the Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) architecture, which was proposed and implemented by the team from Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, Sweden, that joined the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge (GCDC) in 2011. The proposed CACC architecture consists of the following three main components, which are described in detail: 1) communication; 2) sensor fusion; and 3) control. Both simulation and experimental results are provided, demonstrating that the proposed CACC system can drive within a vehicle platoon while minimizing the inter-vehicle spacing within the allowed range of safety distances, tracking a desired speed profile, and attenuating acceleration shockwaves. View full abstract»

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  • Team AnnieWAY's Entry to the 2011 Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1008 - 1017
    Cited by:  Papers (13)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (882 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we present the concepts and methods developed for the autonomous vehicle known as AnnieWAY, which is our winning entry to the 2011 Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge. We describe algorithms for sensor fusion, vehicle-to-vehicle communication, and cooperative control. Furthermore, we analyze the performance of the proposed methods and compare them with those of competing teams. We close with our results from the competition and lessons learned. View full abstract»

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  • Cooperative Competition for Future Mobility

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1018 - 1025
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (774 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In May 2011, the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge (GCDC) was held, providing the possibility for teams to develop and compare their cooperative driving solutions in a competitive setting. The challenge was organized to further accelerate developments in the area of cooperative driving. Nine international teams challenged each other to handle both an urban and a highway scenario. These scenarios have been chosen such that the performance of the implementation of cooperative adaptive cruise control of each participant can be judged. Evaluation of the vehicle behavior has been performed by means of video-based roadside units, installed at the test site in The Netherlands, that is capable of tracking the individual vehicles, in addition to the information obtained through wireless communication. Judgment criteria include both macroscale criteria, such as platoon length and traffic light throughput, and individual criterion, like string stability. Most teams performed well, although clear differences in performance and reliability could be observed. The GCDC showed that it is possible to cooperatively drive with heterogeneous systems. It is envisioned to make the GCDC a regular event and to further extend the active role of roadside communication units, as well as include automated lateral vehicle control. View full abstract»

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  • Cooperative Driving With a Heavy-Duty Truck in Mixed Traffic: Experimental Results

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1026 - 1032
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (773 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the implementation and testing of a Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) strategy on a heavy-duty truck. The adopted control strategy utilizes additional information exchange through wireless communication to improve the vehicle-following behavior achieved by the underlying adaptive cruise controller (ACC). The control method is evaluated in a mixed traffic condition. It is shown that the truck can perform smooth predecessor following in most of the test scenarios, even for small intervehicle distances. Furthermore, the results demonstrate how string stability is affected by wireless communication imperfections and acceleration (deceleration) limitations of the heavy-duty truck in an inhomogeneous platoon. View full abstract»

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  • The Development of a Cooperative Heavy-Duty Vehicle for the GCDC 2011: Team Scoop

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1033 - 1049
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1311 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The first edition of the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge (GCDC) was held in the Netherlands in May 2011. Nine international teams competed in urban and highway platooning scenarios with prototype vehicles using cooperative adaptive cruise control. Team Scoop, a collaboration between KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, and Scania CV AB, Södertälje, Sweden, participated at the GCDC with a Scania R-series tractor unit. This paper describes the development and design of Team Scoop's prototype system for the GCDC. In particular, we present considerations with regard to the system architecture, state estimation and sensor fusion, and the design and implementation of control algorithms, as well as implementation issues with regard to the wireless communication. The purpose of the paper is to give a broad overview of the different components that are needed to develop a cooperative driving system: from architectural design, workflow, and functional requirement descriptions to the specific implementation of algorithms for state estimation and control. The approach is more pragmatic than scientific; it collects a number of existing technologies and gives an implementation-oriented view of a cooperative vehicle. The main conclusion is that it is possible, with a modest effort, to design and implement a system that can function well in cooperation with other vehicles in realistic traffic scenarios. View full abstract»

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  • A Modular CACC System Integration and Design

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1050 - 1061
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1535 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper describes the Halmstad University entry in the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge, which is a competition in vehicle platooning. Cooperative platooning has the potential to improve traffic flow by mitigating shock wave effects, which otherwise may occur in dense traffic. A longitudinal controller that uses information exchanged via wireless communication with other cooperative vehicles to achieve string-stable platooning is developed. The controller is integrated into a production vehicle, together with a positioning system, communication system, and human-machine interface (HMI). A highly modular system architecture enabled rapid development and testing of the various subsystems. In the competition, which took place in May 2011 on a closed-off highway in The Netherlands, the Halmstad University team finished second among nine competing teams. View full abstract»

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  • Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control Implementation of Team Mekar at the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1062 - 1074
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2308 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents the cooperative adaptive cruise control implementation of Team Mekar at the Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge (GCDC). The Team Mekar vehicle used a dSpace microautobox for access to the vehicle controller area network bus and for control of the autonomous throttle intervention and the electric-motor-operated brake pedal. The vehicle was equipped with real-time kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS) and an IEEE 802.11p modem installed in an onboard computer for vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication. The Team Mekar vehicle did not have an original-equipment-manufacturer-supplied adaptive cruise control (ACC). ACC/Cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC) based on V2V-communicated GPS position/velocity and preceding vehicle acceleration feedforward were implemented in the Team Mekar vehicle. This paper presents experimental and simulation results of the Team Mekar CACC implementation, along with a discussion of the problems encountered during the GCDC cooperative mobility runs. View full abstract»

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  • Driving in the Fast Lane: Full Speed Toward Better Quality and Service

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1075 - 1077
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  • A Prototype of the Next-Generation Journal System for ITS: Academic Social Networking and Media Based on Web 3.0

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1078 - 1087
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (783 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Since the first peer-reviewed journal appeared in the late 17th century, journals have been the most important platform for scientists to publish articles. Over the last decade, the fast growth of online social networking and media services has brought us numerous valuable data and several applications to track the topic trends in a held and facilitate collaborations between scientists, thus making Web 2.0 and the emerging Web 3.0 as essential as electronic and paper formats for managing scientific journals. In this paper, we propose a working prototype for an intelligent journal system (IJS) for intelligent transportation systems based on the idea of Web 3.0-based next generation of journal systems: IJSs. Some preliminary results are presented to show the validity of our system. View full abstract»

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  • A Learning Approach Towards Detection and Tracking of Lane Markings

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1088 - 1098
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Multimedia
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (919 KB)  

    Road scene analysis is a challenging problem that has applications in autonomous navigation of vehicles. An integral component of this system is the robust detection and tracking of lane markings. It is a hard problem primarily due to large appearance variations in lane markings caused by factors such as occlusion (traffic on the road), shadows (from objects like trees), and changing lighting conditions of the scene (transition from day to night). In this paper, we address these issues through a learning-based approach using visual inputs from a camera mounted in front of a vehicle. We propose the following: 1) a pixel-hierarchy feature descriptor to model the contextual information shared by lane markings with the surrounding road region; 2) a robust boosting algorithm to select relevant contextual features for detecting lane markings; and 3) particle filters to track the lane markings, without knowledge of vehicle speed, by assuming the lane markings to be static through the video sequence and then learning the possible road scene variations from the statistics of tracked model parameters. We investigate the effectiveness of our algorithm on challenging daylight and night-time road video sequences. View full abstract»

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  • We Can Deliver Messages to Far Vehicles

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1099 - 1115
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1971 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Vehicular ad hoc networks (VANETs) enable vehicles to communicate with each other but require efficient and robust routing protocols for their success. In this paper, we exploit the infrastructure of roadside units (RSUs) to efficiently and reliably route packets in VANETs. Our system operates by using vehicles to carry and forward messages from a source vehicle to a nearby RSU and, if needed, route these messages through the RSU network and, finally send them from an RSU to the destination vehicle. Our system is mostly critical for users who are far apart and want to communicate using their vehicles' onboard units. Many recent paradigms, like social networks, will greatly benefit from a system like ours to enable users on the road to exchange different types of data. We evaluate the performance of our system using the ns2 simulation platform and compare our scheme to existing solutions. The results prove the feasibility and efficiency of our scheme. View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive Metering Algorithm for Electronic Commercial Vehicle Preclearance Systems

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1116 - 1124
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (357 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents an adaptive metering algorithm for enhancing the electronic screening (e-screening) operation at truck weight stations. This algorithm uses a feedback control mechanism to control the level of truck vehicles entering the weight station. The basic operation of the algorithm allows more trucks to be inspected when the weight station is underutilized by adjusting the weight threshold lower. Alternatively, the algorithm restricts the number of trucks to inspect when the station is overutilized to prevent queue spillover. The proposed control concept is demonstrated and evaluated in a simulation environment. The simulation results demonstrate the considerable benefits of the proposed algorithm in improving overweight enforcement with minimal negative impacts on nonoverweighed trucks. The test results also reveal that the effectiveness of the algorithm improves with higher truck participation rates in the e-screening program. View full abstract»

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  • A Queueing Model Based Intelligent Human–Machine Task Allocator

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1125 - 1137
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (868 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Automatic machines are increasingly being used to help drivers automatically complete tasks; however, the high error rate of automatic machines limits how they might reduce driver task load. Therefore, allocating tasks between human and machine becomes an important question in system design. Existing methods of task allocation do not consider several natural characteristics of human-machine systems simultaneously, including speed-error tradeoff, cognitive modeling of workload, multicriteria decision modeling, dynamic allocation, and global optimum. In this paper, a queueing model-based intelligent task allocator (QM-ITA) that covers the criteria above and optimally allocates tasks between a human operator and an automatic machine is developed. The optimal task allocation algorithm is described in four scenarios that demonstrate how QM-ITA is able to minimize the workload of human operator, minimize system error rate, propose a maximum acceptable error rate of an automatic machine, determine if an automatic machine is necessary for a system, and suggest a maximum acceptable task arrival rate. Further development of the model and the prospects for future research are also discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Dynamic Modeling of Driver Control Strategy of Lane-Change Behavior and Trajectory Planning for Collision Prediction

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1138 - 1155
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2012 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper introduces a dynamic model of the driver control strategy of lane-change behavior and applies it to trajectory planning in driver-assistance systems. The proposed model reflects the driver control strategies of adjusting longitudinal and latitudinal acceleration during the lane-change process and can represent different driving styles (such as slow and careful, as well as sudden and aggressive) by using different model parameters. We also analyze the features of the dynamic model and present the methods for computing the maximum latitudinal position and arrival time. Furthermore, we put forward an extended dynamic model to represent evasive lane-change behavior. Compared with the fifth-order polynomial lane-change model, the dynamic models fit actual lane-change trajectories better and can generate more accurate lane-change trajectories. We apply the dynamic models in emulating different lane-change strategies and planning lane-change trajectories for collision prediction. In the simulation, we use the models to compute the percentage of safe trajectories in different scenarios. The simulation shows that the maximum latitudinal position and arrival time of the generated lane-change trajectories can be good indicators of safe lane-change trajectories. In the field test, the dynamic models can generate the feasible lane-change trajectories and efficiently obtain the percentage of safe trajectories by computing the minimum gap and time to collision. The proposed dynamic model and module can be combined with the human-machine interface to help the driver easily identify safe lane-change trajectories and area. View full abstract»

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  • Vehicular Traffic Density State Estimation Based on Cumulative Road Acoustics

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1156 - 1166
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (957 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper considers the problem of vehicular traffic density estimation, utilizing the information cues present in the cumulative acoustic signal acquired from a roadside-installed single microphone. This cumulative signal comprises several noise signals such as tire noise, engine noise, engine-idling noise, occasional honks, and air turbulence noise of multiple vehicles. The occurrence and mixture weightings of these noise signals are determined by the prevalent traffic density conditions on the road segment. For instance, under a free-flowing traffic condition, the vehicles typically move with medium to high speeds and thereby produce mainly tire noise and air turbulence noise and less engine-idling noise and honks. For slow-moving congested traffic, the cumulative signal will largely be dominated by engine-idling noise and honks; air turbulence and tire noises will be inconspicuous. Furthermore, these various noise signals have spectral content that are very different from each other and, hence, can be used to discriminate between the different traffic density states that lead to them. Therefore, in this work, we extract the short-term spectral envelope features of the cumulative acoustic signals and model their class-conditional probability distributions, conditioned on one of the three broad traffic density states, i.e., Jammed (0-10 km/h), Medium-Flow (10-40 km/h), and Free-Flow (40 km/h and above) traffic. While these states are coarse measures of the average traffic speed, they nevertheless can provide useful traffic density information in the often-chaotic and nonlane-driven traffic conditions of the developing geographies, where other techniques (magnetic loop detectors) are inapplicable. Based on these learned distributions, we use a Bayes' classifier to classify the acoustic signal segments spanning a duration of 5-30 s, which results in a high classification accuracy of ~95%. Using a discriminative classifier such as a support vector machine (SVM) re- ults in further classification accuracy gains over the Bayes' classifier. View full abstract»

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  • Gaze Fixation System for the Evaluation of Driver Distractions Induced by IVIS

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1167 - 1178
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (956 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a method to monitor driver distraction based on a stereo camera to estimate the face pose and gaze of a driver in real time. A coarse eye direction is composed of face pose estimation to obtain the gaze and driver's fixation area in the scene, which is a parameter that gives much information about the distraction pattern of the driver. The system does not require any subject-specific calibration; it is robust to fast and wide head rotations and works under low-lighting conditions. The system provides some consistent statistics, which help psychologists to assess the driver distraction patterns under influence of different in-vehicle information systems (IVISs). These statistics are objective, as the drivers are not required to report their own distraction states. The proposed gaze fixation system has been tested on a set of challenging driving experiments directed by a team of psychologists in a naturalistic driving simulator. This simulator mimics conditions present in real driving, including weather changes, maneuvering, and distractions due to IVISs. Professional drivers participated in the tests. View full abstract»

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  • Integrity and Continuity for Automated Surface Conflict-Detection Monitoring

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1179 - 1187
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (463 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses how surface surveillance technologies impact the design of automated conflict-detection capability for a next-generation air transportation system dubbed NextGen. In NextGen, automated conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) algorithms will be necessary to assist air traffic controllers in identifying and mitigating potential hazards posed by nonconforming aircraft. Given this high reliance on automation, rigorous specifications for conflict detection (CD) algorithm continuity and integrity risk will be required. Continuity risk refers to the probability that a CD alert interrupts an ongoing operation; integrity risk refers to the probability that the CD algorithm fails to provide an alert rapidly enough to resolve the conflict. The continuity and integrity of CD algorithms strongly depend on the quality of surface surveillance sensor measurements; as such, we propose mechanisms for modifying the CD&R algorithm design to rigorously account for the capabilities and limitations of surveillance sensors. View full abstract»

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  • Maritime Traffic Monitoring Based on Vessel Detection, Tracking, State Estimation, and Trajectory Prediction

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1188 - 1200
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1055 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Maneuvering vessel detection and tracking (VDT), incorporated with state estimation and trajectory prediction, are important tasks for vessel navigational systems (VNSs), as well as vessel traffic monitoring and information systems (VTMISs) to improve maritime safety and security in ocean navigation. Although conventional VNSs and VTMISs are equipped with maritime surveillance systems for the same purpose, intelligent capabilities for vessel detection, tracking, state estimation, and navigational trajectory prediction are underdeveloped. Therefore, the integration of intelligent features into VTMISs is proposed in this paper. The first part of this paper is focused on detecting and tracking of a multiple-vessel situation. An artificial neural network (ANN) is proposed as the mechanism for detecting and tracking multiple vessels. In the second part of this paper, vessel state estimation and navigational trajectory prediction of a single-vessel situation are considered. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) is proposed for the estimation of vessel states and further used for the prediction of vessel trajectories. Finally, the proposed VTMIS is simulated, and successful simulation results are presented in this paper. View full abstract»

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  • Assessing the Mobility and Environmental Benefits of Reservation-Based Intelligent Intersections Using an Integrated Simulator

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1201 - 1214
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (856 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The connected vehicle research program is a multimodal research initiative in the U.S. that envisions a fully connected transportation system with wireless communications linking vehicles, the infrastructure, and handheld smart devices. This paper designs and evaluates a reservation-based approach to intersection control that is designed to take full advantage of the unprecedented connectivity that the connected vehicle initiative promises to provide. The control approach, which is referred to herein as the “intelligent intersection” approach, builds on the previous work by Dresner and Stone by introducing new features to better account for several aspects of the real-world driving environment. To design and evaluate the “intelligent intersection,” a novel simulation test bed for connected vehicle applications is developed. The test bed integrates a microscopic traffic simulator with a network simulator and an emission analyzer. Using the integrated simulator, the mobility and environmental benefits of the intelligent intersection approach, compared with those of traditional control methods, are evaluated on two case studies: 1) an isolated intersection and 2) a real-world transportation network with multiple intersections. Results show that the proposed control approach offers significant mobility and environmental benefits. For example, for the second test case and using observed traffic volumes, the intelligent intersection reduced the average vehicle delay by 85%, fuel consumption by 50%, and emissions by 39%-50%. The study also demonstrates the utility of using the simulator test bed in the design and evaluation of connected vehicle applications. View full abstract»

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  • Detection and Classification of Vehicles From Video Using Multiple Time-Spatial Images

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1215 - 1225
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (873 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Detection and classification of vehicles are two of the most challenging tasks of a video-based intelligent transportation system. Traditional detection and classification methods are computationally highly expensive and become unsuccessful in many cases such as occlusion among the vehicles and when differences between pixel intensities of vehicles and backgrounds are small. In this paper, a novel detection and classification method is proposed using multiple time-spatial images (TSIs), each obtained from a virtual detection line on the frames of a video. Such a use of multiple TSIs provides the opportunity to identify the latent occlusions among the vehicles and to reduce the dependencies of the pixel intensities between the still and moving objects to increase the accuracy of detection performance as well as to achieve an improved classification performance. In order to identify the class of a particular vehicle, a two-step k nearest neighborhood classification scheme is proposed by utilizing the shape-based, shape-invariant, and texture-based features of the segmented regions corresponding to the vehicle appeared in appropriate frames that are determined from the TSIs of the video. Extensive experimentations are carried out in vehicular traffics of varying environments to evaluate the detection and classification performance of the proposed method, as compared with the existing methods. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method provides a significant improvement in counting and classifying the vehicles in terms of accuracy and robustness alongside a substantial reduction of execution time, as compared with that of the other methods. View full abstract»

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  • Formal Language Modeling and Simulations of Incident Management

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1226 - 1234
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (397 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Traffic incident management (TIM) is a multijurisdictional process. Complications with communications, compatibility, coordination, institutional responsibilities, and legal issues are inherent in TIM systems. Increased delay in incident clearance due to various conflicts has vital economical, safety, environmental, and social impacts. Therefore, a thorough and rigorous modeling of the system is necessary to better understand its properties and systematically discern issues that may arise. The goal of this study is to develop modeling tools for the incident management process. Formal language automata theory is proposed for modeling and analysis since incident management can be viewed as a series of discrete events. Using formal methods allows us to use tools that are well established in this field to systematically study incident management processes. Formal language and automata theory are the foundation for numerous hardware and software development with applications in digital design, compilers, and programming languages. Formal language and automata theory provide us with powerful tools for developing, analyzing, and debugging such models. A systematic structure of an incident management model permits methodical identification of the system's “bugs.” This study demonstrates the development of models of some first response incident management agencies through a case study in the Las Vegas, NV, area using formal languages and automata theory. Sequence properties such as safety and liveness are verified for the developed models. View full abstract»

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  • Travel Information: Time to Drop the Labels?

    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 1235 - 1242
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (316 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper argues that the literature on travel information and its potential as a travel demand management tool suffers from confusing use of terminology. It shows how labels such as “advanced,” “personalized,” and “dynamic”-when referring to travel information services-have been either implicitly or explicitly assigned a variety of often quite different meanings in various contexts. As a result, these labels, and similar labels such as “predictive” and “intelligent,” often obfuscate rather than explain what kind of travel information is actually being discussed. Several options for avoiding this confusion in future research are presented. For example, one option is to entirely forego the use of labels and instead describe travel information services in terms of their relevant characteristics and functionalities. Another option is to start using recently proposed definitions and International Standards Organization standards, with the aim of achieving a more formal building ground for travel-information-related research than is currently available. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on ITS is concerned with the design, analysis, and control of information technology as it is applied to transportation systems. The IEEE ITS Transactions is focused on the numerous technical aspects of ITS technologies spanned by the IEEE. Transportation systems are invariably complex, and their complexity arises from many sources. Transportation systems can involve humans, vehicles, shipments, information technology, and the physical infrastructure, all interacting in complex ways. Many aspects of transportation systems are uncertain, dynamic and nonlinear, and such systems may be highly sensitive to perturbations. Controls can involve multiple agents that (and/or who) are distributed and hierarchical. Humans who invariably play critical roles in a transportation system have a diversity of objectives and a wide range of skills and education. Transportation systems are usually large-scale in nature and are invariably geographically distributed.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Fei-Yue Wang
Professor
University of Arizona